Running head: you, me, and apa (or insert nifty title here)



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Running head: YOU, ME, AND APA (OR INSERT NIFTY TITLE HERE)

You, Me, and APA (Or Insert Nifty Title Here)

Jane Doe (Your name)

Florida Gulf Coast University (Your University/Affiliation)


Abstract


An abstract should be between 150 and 300 words. It is used to provide the reader with a short summary of your paper including your main points, and the purpose of your essay. An abstract is not always needed, so make sure you talk to your professor before you include this in your final paper. Additionally, any abbreviations and acronyms used in the paper should be defined in the abstract for the benefit of the reader.
Keywords: Include the keywords of your paper separated by commas. For example, if you were writing a paper on how FGCU students could benefit from using the Writing Center, some of your keywords could like so:

Keywords: Florida Gulf Coast University, Writing Center, Student Resource, Writing
You, Me, and APA (Or Insert Nifty Title Here)

You will begin your paper here, at the beginning of your third page. If you are not using any headings in your paper then there are no new formatting requirements from this point until your reference page. Everything will be double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, and 1” margins. If you do have headings, then you need to keep in mind that there are different kinds of headings. Below we will go over the three most common ones.



Heading 1

This is what a level one heading looks like. It is bolded, centered, and capitalized. Your writing will begin immediately below this heading as a new paragraph. Whatever you are writing, below your heading will be formatted in the same manner as the rest of your paper (i.e. double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, and 1” margins).



Heading 2

This is what a level two heading looks like. It is flush left, bolded, and capitalized. Your writing will begin immediately below this heading as a new paragraph. As stated above, your writing below this heading will remain in the same format (i.e. double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, and 1” margins).



Heading 3 This is what a level three heading looks like. It is bolded, capitalized, and indented once (i.e. 0.5”). Your writing begins immediately following this heading, only separated by a 0.5” indentation, unlike heading one and two where it begins as a new paragraph.

References

Jones, A. (2012). Choosing a puppy. How To Train Your Dog, 22(4), 212-214. Doi: 12.3456/1234-1234.12.3.456

Louv, Richard. (2011). Nature-deficit disorder and the restorative environment. In University Colloquium: A sustainable future (pp. 1-14). Acton, MA: Copley Custom Textbooks. (Reprinted from Last child in the woods. 2005, Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin).

Taglioni, A. (2013). The athleticism and artistry of dance. New York, NY: A University Press.

•Your reference list will be in the same format as the rest of your paper (Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, double-spaced, 1” margins, and no bullets).

•Reference list entries should be in alphabetical order and begin with the author’s last name.

•All lines after the first line of each entry in your reference list should be indented one-half inch from the left margin. This is called hanging indentation, like so.

•If the work has more than seven authors, list the first six authors, then use ellipses (…), and then the last author's last name.

•For multiple articles by the same author, or authors listed in the same order, list the entries in chronological order, from earliest to most recent.

•Present the journal title in full.

•Capitalize all major words in journal titles.

•When referring to books, chapters, articles, or Web pages, capitalize only the first letter of the first word of a title and subtitle, the first word after a colon or a dash in the title, and proper nouns. Do not capitalize the first letter of the second word in a hyphenated compound word.

•Italicize titles of longer works such as books and journals.

•Do not italicize, underline, or put quotes around the titles of shorter works such as journal articles or essays in edited collections.

IN-TEXT CITATION

Bledsoe (2014) raised issues of writing skills in high school classrooms.

Another study raised issues of writing skills in high school classrooms (Bledsoe, 2014).

Davidson, Smith, Jacobs, and Burt (2012) stated…

Davidson et al. (2012) observed….

(et al. is used after first use when there are three or more authors)



See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 177
PARENTHETICAL CITATIONS IN TEXT

(Davidson, Smith, Jacobs, & Burt, 2012) or (Davidson et al., 2012)


One work by six or more authors:

Ryan et al. (2009) or (Ryan et al., 2009)



See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 177


DIRECT QUOTE

Bledsoe (2011) coined the phrase “tutoring to teach” (p. 11).



or

The phrase that aptly describes the impact of working in a writing center is “tutoring to teach” (Bledsoe, 2011, p. 11).



See APA manual (6th ed.), Chapter 6, p. 171
Block quote (40 words or more):

Students at Florida Gulf Coast University have faced challenges when working on group projects that involve a lot of writing. When discussing the challenges, Bledsoe (2012) stated:


The FGCU Writing Center assists with group writing assignments and projects. Our main goal is to help writers improve their writing skills and ability to revise independently. Therefore, the session is most effective if all of the group members are present. We realize that it may not be possible for all group members to attend the same session. If this is the case, our consultant can assist with mechanics, but he or she will not be able to effectively provide suggestions for development on the sections written by group members who are not present. (p. 2)

Hoffman (2013), however, says ….


CITING OF FULL-TEXT HTML RESOURCES

In another case, Cortez, Frederick, Rodriguez, and West (2009) found that group projects should be “completed without the assistant of tutors because these projects are meant to assist students in self-directed studies and teamwork” (Group work, para. 3).



or

“The surveys completed by Santiago were challenged by the MLA committee” (Foster, Campbell, & Davidson, 2008, “Issues with Short-term Surveys,” para. 5).



See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 171-172
REFERENCE LIST

Article with DOI assigned-Electronic Articles

Jones, A. (2012). Choosing a puppy. How To Train Your Dog, 22(4), 212-214. Doi: 12.3456/1234-1234.12.3.456



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 198, #1 & #2)
Article with no DOI assigned-Electronic Articles

James, R. J., & Smith, C. W. (2008). Keeping the price of your groceries affordable while eating like a king. Royal Food, 6(2), 40-45. Retrieved from http://abc.lib.royalchefs.edu/123456789



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 199, #3)
Website–magazine, journal or newspaper article.

McMilan, A. C. (2014). Music as team-building. Music and Education, 14, 52-57. Retrieved from http://www.abc.org/music/teams



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 200, #8 & #11)
Entire book--Electronic Book

Grande, A. (n.d.) Using your computer at work. Retrieved from http://www.thisisnotawebsite.com/sdgjhsdngvkjs.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 203, #19 & #20)
Book by a single author-Printed Book

Taglioni, A. (2013). The athleticism and artistry of dance. New York, NY: A University Press.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 203, #18)
Book with no author or editor

Place the title of the chapter in the author spot when there is no author:

Making Doughnuts. (2014). What to make with your new deep fryer. Philadelphia, PA: Random Hotel.



Book with editors

Dell, F., Muffett, L., & Piper, P. (Eds.). (1999). Fairy tales: More than children’s stories. Washington, DC: Association for the Future of Fairy Tales.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 202)

Book chapter-Electronic Book

Hogan, R. (2013). Sewing with leather. In P.T. New & C.K. LeBeau (Eds.), Today’s seamstress(Vol. 2, pp. 26-28). Retrieved from SewBooks database.



Online encyclopedia or other online reference work with no author

Morris, J. (2012). Music. In J.B. Ball (Ed.), The encyclopedia of things. Retrieved January 15, 2013. From http://thissite.website.edu



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 205, #30)
Data set

Data Central. (2000). Blonde from a bottle: A survey of conceptions based on hair color. [Data file and code book]. Retrieved from http://www.datacentral.com/blonde



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 211, #54)
Graphic representation of data

Center for Studying Writing Centers. (2005). [Interactive map showing percentage of students who attended writing centers at least once during the past semester]. College Edcator. Retrieved from http://www.writing.somewhere.edu/survey/kjshdg/sdhbvkiuegfn



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 210, #53)
Annual report

Organization, LLC. (2010). Organization for all: Annual review and summary of program 2009. Retrieved from http://www.organization/programs/report.pdf



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 206, #33)
Interview–conducted by the researcher

Interviews, emails, and telephone conversations are personal communications. Therefore, they are only cited in the text of the paper, not in the reference list.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p 179, 6.20)
Example 1. J. P. Smith (personal communication, October 2, 1999)

Example 2. (J. W. Morgan, personal communication, June , 2000)



Film or video recording

Cohen, J. (Producer), & O’Donald, Y. (Director). (2011). The film [DVD]. New York, NY: Rad Vids.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 209, 7.07)
Television program–broadcast

Young, W. (Producer). (2011, December 3). TV in America [Television program]. Fort Myers, FL: WXYZ America.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 210, #51)

Video blog post

Anderson, A. B. (2012), January 1). Training your cat [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.videoblogs.com/postoftoday123456789



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 215, #77)
Message posted to a newsgroup, online forum, blog posting, or discussion group

Gonzalez, S. J. (2011, June 5). Interface problems [Online forum comment or electronic mailing list message or Web log message]. Retrieved from http://groups.thissite.com/sdhgoksuhdgvks



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 215, #74 & #76)
Unpublished raw data

Evans, J., & Klaus, S. (2014). [Citations from annotated bibliographies]. Unpublished raw data.



(See APA manual (6th ed.), p. 212, #60)


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