Lesson basics



Download 35.74 Kb.
Date16.06.2018
Size35.74 Kb.
#52381
COMPREHENSIVE LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE

Instructor Name: John Jones

Date Submitted:

June 1, 2014



Class Location: Smithville Learning Center
LESSON BASICS

Meaningful Topic:

Using graphs to analyze spending as part of budgeting unit.



Student Types/Group:

☒ABE ☐ESL ☒HS Equiv Prep

☒Career Aware ☒College Prep

☒SPOKES ☐Computer Lit

☐Other: Click here to enter text.

Length of Lesson:

My Spending Story



Standard(s):




M.1HS8.LER.11

describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been described verbally.


M.AMM.FI.4

research and analyze personal budgets based on given parameters. For example: Fixed and discretionary expenses, insurance, gross vs. net pay, types of income (wage, salary, commission), career choice, geographic region, retirement and/or investment planning, etc.

M.AMM.S.4

describe strengths and weaknesses of sampling techniques, data and graphical displays and interpretations of summary statistics and other results appearing in a study, including reports published in the media.

M.AMM.S.10

report results of statistical studies to a particular audience, including selecting an appropriate presentation format, creating graphical data displays and interpreting results in terms of the question studied.









Depth of Knowledge:

☒1. Recall and Reproduction

☒2. Skills and Concepts

☒3. Short-term Strategic Thinking

☐4. Extended Thinking

Essential Question:

How can graphs help reveal a person’s spending story?

How can graphs help me draw conclusions and make recommendations for the future?
Objective(s):

Use graphs to visually represent data.

Determine which type of graph will best display the information.

Interpret graphs to tell a story about the data.

Determine what data is needed to tell the rest of the story.

Make recommendations about spending after analyzing spending habits.



Required Materials/Equipment/Technology/Community Resources:

SmartBoard or projector, ipads or cell phones, computers with Microsoft Excel, responders


Prior Knowledge/ Connections:

Students will complete budgeting lesson before this lesson.


Students will have learned how to and practiced entering information into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet in a previous class.

Required Vocabulary:

inference

conclusion

causation

correlation

bar graph

pie chart/circle graph

line graph

scatter plot

trend


percentage

cell


formula

range


domain

axis


legend
Instructional Methods:

☒Large Group

☒Small Group

☒Cooperative Learning

☒Project-based

☒Independent Study

☐Computer-assisted

☐One-on-One Tutorial

☐Individualized

☐Guest Speaker

☐Field Trip

☐Other: Click here to enter text.



ACTIVITY PLAN

  1. Warm-up/Review/Connections:

Students will be shown a table tracking a person’s spending over time and asked to work in small groups to write several observations and inferences about the spending table. They will then be encouraged to write a story that answers the question “What story do these numbers tell?” Additional data will be revealed and the students will be asked to add to the story. The students will be asked to draw a picture to go with their stories and to present it to the class. We will then discuss the inferences that were drawn from the data and the pictures that were created. We will discuss the fact that another type of visual representation that could be used to tell a spending story is a graph.


  1. Introduction to Content/Explanation:

Students will be shown examples of graphs about spending and budgets. They will be asked to match the type of graph with the type of data that is being displayed and the story that is being told. For example, a line graph showing a person’s spending on gas over twelve months, a pie graph showing a person’s spending on various categories over one month, and a bar graph showing a person’s spending on various categories over a three-month period will be displayed. Students will be asked to summarize the best use for each type of graph on a note-taking sheet. Students will then be told that we are going to learn how to create each type of graph so that they will be able to tell a visual story about their own spending after collecting data during the week.


  1. Presentation/Model the Learning Process:

  1. Instructor will show students how to create a pie graph by hand using a pie graph template; students who prefer to follow written instructions or watch a video about how to create a pie chart by hand will work in an adjacent area.




  1. Instructor will then show students how to create a pie graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them; students who prefer to follow written instructions or watch a video about how to create a pie chart in Excel will work in an adjacent area.




  1. Instructor will show students how to create a line graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them; students who prefer to follow written instructions or watch a video about how to create a pie chart in Excel will work in an adjacent area.




  1. Instructor will show students how to create a bar graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them; students who prefer to follow written instructions or watch a video about how to create a pie chart in Excel will work in an adjacent area.




  1. Scaffolded/Guided Concrete Practice:

  1. Students will follow step-by-step instructions that are available in both written and video formats to create a pie graph on a pie graph template using data that has been given to them.




  1. Students will follow step-by-step instructions that are available in both written and video formats to create a pie graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them.




  1. Students will follow step-by-step instructions that are available in both written and video formats to create a line graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them.




  1. Students will follow step-by-step instructions that are available in both written and video formats to create a bar graph in Microsoft Excel using a spreadsheet that has been created for them.



  1. Students will give one another feedback about their four graphs and the instructor will circulate to give elaborated feedback about the graphs.




  1. Students will be asked to write three possible conclusions that could be drawn based on the data.




  1. The class will come together to discuss conclusions that could be drawn from the graphs.




  1. Communicative/Collaborative Concrete Practice and Grouping Strategies:

Students will then get into groups of two or three financial analysts. Each group will be given a bio and a collection of spending data in spreadsheet form on a flash drive. Each group is asked to create several graphs based on the data and write three conclusions about the data based on the graphs and three suggestions that they would give to a client after analyzing this data. Suggestions can range from types of data to collect in the future to ways to reduce spending in specific areas.


  1. Independent Concrete Practice/Application:

Students will be asked to track their own spending for one week and analyze their own spending data. They will be shown a free app that is available for download called iSpend and given the option of using it if they have a smartphone or tablet.
Students will then be asked to write a narrative about what the data reveals, using at least one graph to support the conclusions. Students will be asked to identify what additional information they need to collect in the future to get the whole story and to identify three changes that they would like to implement based on the current spending story. Students will be given the following choices about how to present their findings: present to the class, create a poster, create a PowerPoint presentation, or create a video.


  1. Assessment:

Instructor will look at graphs created by individuals during the scaffolded practice and by the groups during the collaborative practice. Students will be given a rubric to evaluate their own final project.


  1. Wrap-up/Concluding Activity:

Students will be given responders and asked to evaluate the following statements:

1 = Strongly Disagree 2 = Disagree 3 = Agree 4 = Strongly Agree


I can provide examples of when pie, bar and line graphs can help make data easier to understand.

I can create each of the three types of graphs on my own.

I can analyze data and draw conclusions about data using graphs.

I can analyze my own spending habits and make decisions about future spending.



Students will also be given an opportunity to fill out a +, delta, + card about the activity to give the instructor feedback.


  1. Instructor Reflection:

What went well? Students were well connected to the topic after the previous lesson on spending habits got them warmed up. They were very open to learning. They were not afraid of the graphs or of data in general.
What did not go as planned? I ran out of time because the previous lesson and my lesson were both longer than I thought they would be. It was good that the students were engaged. I just need to budget more time for these two lessons in the future.
What should change? Provide more time.
What should be addressed in future lessons? I would like to do a reading lesson that includes reading a study about the factors that help people be financially successful and factors that can impede financial success. I would like to do a career exploration lesson in which students research a career pathway and create a presentation about a job in that career pathway and the budget that they would implement if they had that job. I would also like to do a writing lesson in which students write a narrative essay about their spending story (past, present, and future).

Download 35.74 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page