Ela unit Plan Template Title of Unit



Download 196.5 Kb.
Page1/3
Date24.01.2019
Size196.5 Kb.
  1   2   3
ELA Unit Plan Template

Title of Unit: A Mid-Semester Dream Come True

Grade Level: 9

Unit Overview:

In this unit, students will read scenes from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, carefully studying the development of theme, characters, and different artistic mediums. Students will work in groups to create presentations of Acts 2-5, focusing on theme, development, characters, and biblical allusions. Students will also write an argumentative essay with claims, counterclaims, and textual evidence. This unit focuses on determining theme and analyzing theme development, providing objective summaries, analyzing complex characters, analyzing different artistic mediums, analyzing how authors treat themes or topics from other sources, and the process of writing arguments.


Unit Introduction/Entry Event:

Discuss with the students the differences in reading the play in class and studying a play and presenting it. Explain to the class that each of them will be performing their own take on a portion of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in just a few weeks!


WV CCRS:

Objectives Directly Taught or Learned
Through Inquiry/Discovery


Evidence of Student Mastery of Content

ELA.9.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a literary text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the literary text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the literary text.

Students will discuss the emerging themes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, providing supporting details. Students will also write objective summaries and create presentations of assigned scenes, focusing on theme.

ELA.9.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Students will make presentations on assigned scenes, demonstrating the role of complex characters in plot and theme development.

ELA.9.14 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific literary work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible, or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Students will analyze two representations of similar scenes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, comparing and contrasting how audience and purpose are treated differently in each.

Students will closely study the biblical allusions in assigned scenes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.



ELA.9.20 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

· Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

· Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

· Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

· Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline.

· Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.



Students will write an argument essay, utilizing the writing process.

Students will write thesis statements and take them through the peer review process.



ELA.9.40 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

·  Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism or oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

· Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.


Students will complete a self-created reader’s guide dealing specifically with figurative language and word relationships in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Performance Objectives:
Know:
Process for a close read

Process for class discussion

Process of collaboration

Process of analyzing visual literacy

The writing process

The principals of argumentative writing

Definition of theme and process of discovering theme

Do:

Demonstrate understanding of theme and characterization

Develop an argument essay

Create claims and counterclaims and support both with textual evidence

Compare and contrast a variety of visual media

Collaborate with peers to acquire information or contribute to content knowledge

Develop or strengthen writing as needed through the writing process

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks


Focus/Driving Question:

How does theme emerge and evolve in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream?

How do characters develop in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream?

How do claims, counterclaims, and textual evidence work together to form a strong argument?

How does visual literacy compliment or contrast literature?



Assessment Plan:

Student reading logs (Writer’s Notebook)

Close reading (reflected in log work)

Argument essay (including work with peer editing)

Scene presentations

Text-dependent questions (created by students and teacher)

Analysis of visual literacy

Presentation of selected art medium

Reflections in Writer’s Notebook

Major Products: (Group) or (Individual)

The students will present a portion of the play in their own words with minimal props. The presentation should examine the emerging/developing theme and focus on characterization. Students will also submit an argument essay central to the play.


Assessment and Reflection:

Rubric(s) I will use: (Check all that apply.)

Collaboration




Written Communication
Argumentative Writing Rubric

x

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving




Content Knowledge




Oral Communication, Speaking and Listening

Informative Speaking Rubric



x

Other




Other classroom assessments for learning: (Check all that apply)

Quizzes/ tests




Practice presentations

x

Self-evaluation




Notes




Peer evaluation

x

Checklists/observations

x

Online tests and exams




Concept maps




Reflections: (Check all that apply)

Survey




Focus Group

x

Discussion

x

Task Management Chart




Journal Writing/ Learning Log

x

Other




Manage the Unit:

Teaching Shakespeare to freshman is not easy, nor is it always enjoyable. This unit serves to alleviate the consternation of the students and the frustration of the teacher.


Act I will be taught in class (you may choose to assign parts and read aloud, read yourself, or even show portions of the play on film). Throughout Act I, the classroom will be rife with discussion, focusing on emerging theme, vocabulary, character development, biblical allusions, and figurative language. Students will be asked at the end of each scene to write an objective summary of events. At the end of Act I, students will do a reflective write about what they’ve learned and about how they’ve learned it.

At the end of Act I, students will be asked to create Acting Companies (student-created or teacher-selected groups should be 3-5 students and the number of groups can vary depending on how you want to divide the remainder of the play). These acting companies will be assigned either scenes or entire acts to read, discuss, write about, and finally create a 3-5 minute presentation. The presentation will be live and students will be allowed two chairs and one piece of poster board (which they can decorate/use however they’d like). The presentation must communicate the main idea of the scene/Act and focus on biblical allusion, character development and theme.


Students will have three class days to complete discussion/outline of their presentation and one additional day to practice. During this time the teacher should be in constant motion answering questions, offering support, and monitoring progress. Before the skits are presented, students should do another reflective write on the process they used to “learn” their particular scene and compare it to the methods of Act I.

After student presentations are completed, the teacher will lead the students in discussion of text dependent questions. It is important at this point to make sure that the entire play is clear to the students. You may have had a group who didn’t do a good job with their particular part and you will have to fill in those gaps, if necessary.

Next, students will be asked to closely examine the painting “Titania and Bottom.” They will be asked to analyze the painting, concentrating on what is “emphasized or absent.” They will also view 3-D Street Painting by Tracy Lee Sturn and analyze it likewise. Next, students will get back into their acting groups and do internet searches to find an artistic representation of their selected scene. They will then present this piece to the class with explanation of their choice.

The last part of the unit deals with the Argument essay. The topic for the essay is central to the play, “Is Shakespeare essential in the 21st-Century Classroom? Use specific evidence from the text to support your claim.” Students will start with information about claims and counterclaims then move to thesis writing. After students have had time to construct their thesis, the students will conduct a peer review for conciseness and clarity. Students will then proceed through the writing process with the teacher’s constant presence. Students are given a due date for their drafts at which time the students will peer and self-edit. The next deadline is for the second draft which will be examined during the brief teacher writing conference. Students are to come to the conference with specific questions or highlighted sections for the teacher’s attention. Final edits will then take place with a final due date in place. The teacher will use the 9th Grade Argumentative Instructional Writing Rubric. These polished pieces will be included in the students’ portfolios.

Remember to always differentiate instruction! This unit lends itself nicely to DI in that students are collaborating with reading, writing, and presenting. The Text-Dependent Questions are also left to student choice, which will help students become thoughtful readers at their own pace.

This unit will take approximately 3-4 weeks.



Reflection:
Students will reflect at different times during the unit through personal writing and put these writings in their Writer’s Notebook. There will be a reflection after Act I, after scene presentations, and after going through the writing process for the argument piece.

One of the most beneficial practices of teaching is reflection. Teachers often have students reflect on their learning experiences; reflecting on teaching is also valuable. After each lesson teachers should take time to reflect on the following: What went well with the lesson? What should I consider revising? Was DI successful? Were the students learning ABOUT the subject or leaning to DO the subject? Will I use this lesson in the future? Were students able to produce quality work? Keep these reflections in a composition book or an online journal and try to make this a weekly practice.



Materials/Websites:

Full text of the play www.portcity.edu.bd/ELibrary/ENG/amidsummernightsdream.pdf

Fuseli painting http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/fuseli-titania-and-bottom-n01228

Sturn painting http://www.flickriver.com/photos/tlsart/2548265157/

Thesis peer review http://writingcenter.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/593/2014/06/PeerReviewTemplate.pdf

Harvard Close Reading Strategy https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading

Claim, Support, Question

http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03f_TruthRoutines/ClaimSupport/ClaimSupport_Routine.html

Tug-of-War Strategy



http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03e_FairnessRoutines/TugOfWar/TugOfWar_Routine.html

Sentence Phrase Word http://www.santeesd.net/cms/lib/CA01000468/Centricity/Domain/12/VT_SentPhraseWord.pdf

Reader’s Log

9th Grade Argumentative Instructional Writing Rubric

9th Grade Informative Speaking Rubric

Lesson Plan Info:

Lesson 1 of 5 in Unit Plan - A Mid-Semester Dream Come True


Duration: 180 minutes
Focus/Driving Question: What is the best way to learn Shakespeare?
Lesson Overview: This lesson introduces students to a different approach to learning Shakespeare.
WV CCRS:

CCRS ID

CCR Standards

ELA.9.2

Determine a theme or central idea of a literary text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the literary text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the literary text.

ELA.9.3

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.



Teacher Facilitation of Student Acquisition of Background Knowledge:

The teacher will have the students read Act I, Scene I of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. After students have had ample time in a silent read, the teacher will read the scene aloud. Next, the teacher will ask students to summarize Act I in a “think, pair, share” setting. Next there will be a whole class discussion about the scene. The ensuing scenes of Act I will be explored as the teacher determines (video scenes, student-read parts, teacher read, silent read, etc.).


Anchor Text and Questions for Close Reading:

Act I is to be read/watched with specific attention to emerging/developing theme, character development, and Biblical allusions. Students will use the Sentence-Phrase-Word (SPW) technique. Teachers may ask students to locate at least two Biblical allusions in Act I. Other questions can be directed toward theme and characterization. Students will write an objective summary of Act I, as well.


Vocabulary Development:

Students will start using Frayer Models (look for more in-depth explanation of this at http://www.readingeducator.com/strategies/frayer.htm ) for vocabulary words. They will work in small groups or with partners to construct the ongoing Frayer (category suggestions: 1-copy sentence from play containing the word, 2-offer a guess at the meaning of the word given the context, 3-list other lines from the play that contain the same word, 4-create your own sentence using the word correctly).Students will keep these Frayer models and add to them as they continue to read.

Nuptial wane feign dote beseech

Tyrant lamentable wrath progeny mortal

Tarry fawn tedious surfeit flout

Odious context allusion objective summary




Manage the Lesson:

Step 1

Explain to the students that you will be using different strategies to teach the play. Facilitate a discussion about the differences in student learning in the video.


Step 2

You will teach Act I in class, with Act I, Scene I read silently first. For the ensuing scenes you may choose to assign parts and read aloud, read yourself, or even show portions of the play on film. Discussion will be rife throughout Act I focusing on emerging theme, vocabulary, character development, biblical allusions, and figurative language. You will have students use the Harvard Close Reading Strategy to assist them in understanding the difficult text. Students will also answer text-dependent questions about Act I (attached).


Step 3

Students will start using Frayer Models for vocabulary words. They will work in small groups or with partners to construct the ongoing Frayer (category suggestions: 1-copy sentence from play containing the word, 2-offer a guess at the meaning of the word given the context, 3-list other lines from the play that contain the same word, 4-create your own sentence using the word correctly).Students will keep these Frayer models and add to them as they continue to read.


Step 4

You will then ask students to write an objective summary of events at the end of the scene. You will have students do a reflective write at the end of Act I about what they’ve learned and how they’ve acquired that knowledge.


Active Literacy:

Students will read Act I, Scene I silently, and then through a Think-Pair-Share, they will discuss the characters, Biblical allusions and possible themes. Students will use the Harvard Close Reading Strategy while reading. Other questions can be directed toward theme and characterization. Students will write an objective summary of Act I.


Post Literacy:

Students will complete a summary of the text after reading Act I.


Product/Performance:

Students will write an objective summary and include this in the Writer’s Notebook.

Students will also answer text dependent questions and include those in the Writer’s Notebook as well.
Reflection:

Students will reflect upon the way they studied Act I, determining the effectiveness and engagement of the lesson.


Materials & Resources:

Act I of the play

Paper sample for Frayer Model


Websites:

The entire play can be accessed online at www.portcity.edu.bd/ELibrary/ENG/amidsummernightsdream.pdf

Harvard Close Reading Strategy https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading

Lesson Plan Info:

Lesson 2 of 5 in Unit Plan - A Mid-Semester Dream Come True



Duration: 270 minutes
Focus/Driving Question: How do I read, understand and present Shakespeare in a meaningful way?
Lesson Overview:

This lesson allows students to “discover” the meaning of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Students will work together with close reading strategies and self-created text-dependent questions to determine meaning from their assigned scene/section of the play.


WV CCRS:

CCRS ID

CCR Standards

ELA.9.2

Determine a theme or central idea of a literary text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the literary text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the literary text.

ELA.9.3

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELA.9.6

Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events in an informational text, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

ELA.9.40

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

· Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism or oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

·  Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.



Teacher Facilitation of Student Acquisition of Background Knowledge:

Students will be assigned a portion of the play to read in a small group. Students will work with peers to establish meaning, seek out theme, discuss character development, recognize Biblical allusions and understand figurative language. The grouping of students is critical here. You need to consider reading levels for scaffolding. You may want to put a strong reader with a struggling reader so that scaffolding will occur naturally. Or you may want to assign a less difficult scene to a group of struggling readers with the understanding that you will work closely with that group. You know your classroom! Make the grouping decisions deliberately and thoughtfully. The teacher will be continually circulating the room during this phase to monitor progress, answer questions and offer encouragement.


Anchor Text and Questions for Close Reading:

Students are directed during this phase of the unit to be looking closely at figurative language, Biblical allusions, and character and theme development. Students should use the Harvard Close Reading Strategy used in lesson 1 to help them make sense of the text. Text Dependent Questions and Writing Prompts have been provided for teacher use.


Vocabulary Development:

Students will continue using the Frayer Models.

nuptial wane feign dote beseech

tyrant lamentable wrath progeny mortal

tarry fawn tedious surfeit flout

odious entreat context allusion objective summary


Manage the Lesson:

This portion of the unit where students are going to be most challenged – they will be in a state of disequilibrium and that’s okay! As students go through this process it is important that you let them do it. It is sometimes quite difficult to listen to your students struggle, but this is where true learning will occur.



Step 1

You will determine how to split the rest of the play (by Act if you have a smaller class, or by scene if you have more students). Students are to read the scene however they prefer (silently, or out loud by parts). Students should then be asked to re-read the scene. Students should use the Harvard method to help them make sense of the text.



Step 2

They then have approximately 270 minutes to work in their groups to create and practice their skit. They are allowed ONLY two chairs and a piece of poster board for their presentation! This will, hopefully, encourage them to use their time on the content of the presentation instead of the props. Students should be ready to perform by the end of this lesson! Before the performance, students will write a reflective piece indicating their feelings about the process their group took to understand their part. Give students the 9th Grade Speaking Rubric and the Collaboration Rubric to guide their work.


Active Literacy:

Students will read their assigned portions of the play and create a performance about the assigned part.


Post Literacy:

Students will complete a summary of the text after reading their assigned portion.


Product/Performance:

Students will perform their group interpretation of their assigned part of the play.


Reflection:

Before the performance, students will write a reflective piece indicating their feelings about the process their group took to understand their part.


Materials & Resources:

Assigned part of the play Piece of poster board


Websites:

The entire play can be accessed online at www.portcity.edu.bd/ELibrary/ENG/amidsummernightsdream.pdf

Harvard Close Reading Strategy https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-do-close-reading
Lesson Plan Info:

Lesson 3 of 5 in the Unit A Mid-Semester Dream Come True


Duration: 180 minutes
Focus/Driving Question:

How do I read, understand and present Shakespeare in a meaningful way?

How do artists interpret and represent A Midsummer Night’s Dream?

How do varying perspectives influence characterization?


Lesson Overview:

Students will act out their assigned part of the play and study different artistic mediums of the play as well.



WV CCRS:

CCRS ID

CCR Standards

ELA.9.2

Determine a theme or central idea of a literary text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the literary text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the literary text.

ELA.9.3

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELA.9.14

Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific literary work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible, or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

ELA.9.40

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

·  Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism or oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

·  Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.


Teacher Facilitation of Student Acquisition of Background Knowledge:

The teacher will give the titles, artists’ names, and dates of the artwork before students begin their analysis.


Anchor Text and Questions for Close Reading:

The anchor "text" for this lesson will be the art.


Vocabulary Development:

Research has shown that the least effective strategy for teaching vocabulary is having students look up words and write the definitions.

context allusion objective summary analysis
Manage the Lesson:

Step 1

During the first part of this lesson, students will be performing their interpretations of their assigned part of the play. Teachers will use a presentation rubric for this part of the lesson.


Step 2

Next, students will be asked to closely examine the painting “Titania and Bottom.” Using the “Zoom-in” strategy, students will be asked to analyze the painting, concentrating on what is “emphasized or absent.” They will also view a Shakespeare-inspired, 3-D Street Painting by Tracy Lee Sturn and analyze it likewise. The analysis will be done with two column notes (one column for what is emphasized and one for what is absent) for each piece of art. Students will use their notes in a class discussion about the artists’ works. After all students have discussed the art representing the play, please ask students to get back into their acting team. In these teams students will do internet searches to find a picture, painting, or sculpture that they believe best represents their scene from the play. Students will prepare a brief presentation of their select artwork, explaining why they chose this particular piece.


Active Literacy:

Students will study two pieces of art looking for what is emphasized and what is absent using the “Zoom-in” strategy. Students will then find a piece of art that best represents the scene they studied.


Post Literacy:

Students will compile a list in two-column notes explaining their thoughts on the artwork. Students will give brief presentations on the artwork they selected along with explanation of why the piece is particularly representative


Product/Performance:

Students will perform their group interpretation of their assigned part of the play.

Students will create a graphic organizer while studying artwork.

Students will present their found art and explain their selection.


Reflection:

Students will write a reflective piece about the performance in their Writer’s Notebook (how did you think you did? Your group? What would you have changed? What advice do you have for future students with this assignment?) .


Materials & Resources:

Two chairs for performance

Writer’s Notebook
Websites:

Fuseli painting http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/fuseli-titania-and-bottom-n01228

Sturn painting http://www.flickriver.com/photos/tlsart/2548265157/

Variety of search engines.

Zoom-In Strategy http://digital.library.unlv.edu/boomtown/teaching/primary_sources.php

Lesson Plan Info:

Lesson 4 of 5 In Unit Plan - A Mid-Semester Dream Come True


Duration: 90 minutes
Focus/Driving Question: How do I construct an effective argument essay?
Lesson Overview: Students will begin the process of writing an argument. Present students with the 9th Grade Argumentative Instructional Writing Rubric to guide their work.
WV CCRS:

CCRS ID

CCR Standards

ELA.9.20

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

·  Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

·  Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

·  Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

·  Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline.

·   Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.




Teacher Facilitation of Student Acquisition of Background Knowledge:

Teacher guides students through the process of thesis writing (claims) and understanding of the importance of the counterclaim.


Anchor Text and Questions for Close Reading:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream will serve as the anchor text. Close reading questions will be generated by the students based on their claims.
Vocabulary Development:

Research has shown that the least effective strategy for teaching vocabulary is having students look up words and write the definitions.

claim counterclaim thesis
Manage the Lesson:

Step 1

This lesson deals with the Argument essay. The topic for the essay is central to the play, “Is Shakespeare essential in the 21st-Century Classroom? Use specific evidence from the text to support your claim.” Students will start with information about claims and counterclaims then move to thesis writing.


Step 2

During the process of thesis construction (see the OWL Purdue site which guides students through the process of writing their thesis), teacher will lead students in the “Tug of War” activity (attached) explaining how to construct an effective, prioritized argument.


Step 3

After students have had time to construct their thesis, the students will conduct a peer review for conciseness and clarity using the link https://ablconnect.harvard.edu/book/thesis-statement-peer-review . Students should prepare a draft of their essay for the next class period.


Active Literacy:

Students will explore their argument using the “Tug of War” strategy. Students will write thesis statements, peer review the statements and begin drafting their argument.


Post Literacy:

Students will evaluate thesis statements from their peers.


Product/Performance:

Students will write a thesis statement.


Reflection:

At the end of the peer review process, students will write one sentence about what they learned from the peer review in their Writer’s Notebook.


Materials & Resources:

Text of play

Tug of War strategy
Websites:

Thesis Peer Review instructions https://ablconnect.harvard.edu/book/thesis-statement-peer-review

Thesis Peer Review sheet http://writingcenter.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/593/2014/06/PeerReviewTemplate.pdf

Tug of War Strategy: http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03e_FairnessRoutines/TugOfWar/TugOfWar_Routine.html
Lesson Plan Info:

Lesson 5 of 5 in Unit Plan - A Mid-Semester Dream Come True


Duration: 180 minutes
Focus/Driving Question: How do I construct/revise and edit an effective argumentative essay?
Lesson Overview:

Students will continue the process of writing an argument, utilizing the Claim-Support-Question (CSQ) method.


WV CCRS:

CCRS ID

CCR Standards

ELA.9.20

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

·   Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

·   Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

·   Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

·   Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline.

·   Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.





Teacher Facilitation of Student Acquisition of Background Knowledge:

Teacher will monitor peer reviews (format below) and work closely with students during the teacher conference.


Anchor Text and Questions for Close Reading:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream will serve as the anchor text. Using the Claim-Support-Question process, students will continue writing argument essay. Close reading questions will be generated by the students based on their claims.
Vocabulary Development: none
Manage the Lesson:

Step 1

Students will finalize drafts using the CSQ method.



Step 2

Students will use this time to go through a formal peer review process. Students will be in groups no larger than four. Students will start review by reading their OWN paper aloud. Next students will look at the 9th Grade Argumentative Instructional Writing Rubric and MUST write at least three comments on the rubric. Next, the students will write one suggestions to the author and hand it back to the writer. The writer must keep all copies of the peer review for portfolio purposes.



Step 3

After the peer review, students can be given a class period to work on necessary revisions. Next, the teacher will schedule brief


Step 4

After students have met with teachers, they are to go on to the final draft stage.


Active Literacy:

Students will write argument essays, peer review using the provided rubric, and work with the teacher in a student-led conference.


Post Literacy:

Students will participate in peer review and make necessary adjustments to the essay.


Product/Performance:

Students will write an argument essay.


Reflection:

At the end of the lesson, students will reflect on the writing process in the Writer’s Notebook.


Materials & Resources:

Text of play

9th Grade Argumentative Instructional Writing Rubric

Writer’s Notebook


Websites:

Claim, Support, Question http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03f_TruthRoutines/ClaimSupport/ClaimSupport_Routine.html

Text-Dependent Questions

Anchor Text: A Midsummer Night’s Dream



Text, page or paragraph reference

Text-dependent questions and Writing Prompt

COS’s addressed

Act 1, Scene 1

Using two-column notes and your Writer’s Notebook, write the following characters (Egues, Hermia, Demetrius, Lysander and Helena) and your thoughts (paying close attention to conflicting motivations) on the left and then find specific evidence to support your thinking (quotes) on the right.

ELA.9.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Act 1, Scene 1

Explain the emerging theme using evidence from the text.

ELA.9.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a literary text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the literary text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the literary text.

Act 1, Scene 2

As you read this scene, carefully study Quince. What is Quince’s purpose in the scene? Bottom?

How do the characters interact? How is this scene related to Act I, Scene I? Do these particular characters advance the plot? Explain your answer.



ELA.9.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a literary text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Act 1, Scene 2

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 2, Scene 1

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 2, Scene 2

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 3, Scene 1

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 3, Scene 2

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 4, Scene 1

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 4, Scene 2

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.




Act 5, Scene 1

Students will construct Text-Dependent questions in their acting groups. Questions must be written and answered during the time they are working on their sections of the play.





Download 196.5 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page