Written assignment Hazel has a dramatically different outlook on life than Augustus. Compare



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Written assignment

  1. Hazel has a dramatically different outlook on life than Augustus. Compare the tones and attitudes of the two characters towards their lives, cancer, and impending mortality. Give examples from the book / film that support your ideas.

  1. Augustus regularly has a cigarette hanging out of his mouth, but never lights it. As Hazel puts it, “It’s a metaphor. . . He puts the killing thing in his mouth but doesn’t give it the power to kill him” (146).

Explain the objective of this particular metaphor—what does Augustus’s choice of metaphorical smoking show the reader about his character? Do we really have power over what can / can´t kill us. Give examples from the book / film as well as your opinion.

  1. On Augustus’s Last Good Day, he asks both Hazel and Isaac to attend his prefuneral to eulogize him within the Literal Heart of Jesus (chapter 20, p. 253-260).

Analyze the eulogy that Hazel writes and delivers for Augustus at the prefuneral (259-260). Why does Hazel believe that their love story should die with them, rather than be told? How might the telling of their love story diminish it? What has Hazel gained through her relationship with Augustus? What will she lose when she loses him?

  1. Augustus’s last act of rebellion against his illness finds him stuck at a gas station, a scenario from which Hazel must come to rescue him (242-247).

Discuss the ways in which Augustus’s decline has resulted in a role reversal for himself and Hazel. What aspects of their former relationship roles remain the same, and what aspects of their former relationship roles have been forced to change?

  1. Augustus ends his letter by saying, “You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers,” to which Hazel ends the novel by saying, “I do, Augustus. I do” (313). Did Augustus have to die?

Explain how the novel might have been different if he had not died? How might the novel have been different if Augustus was the narrator, and Hazel had died first? Would Augustus still have felt the same way he did at the end of this different narrative as he did when sitting at her bedside in the ICU?


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