Period: Body Paragraphs: Baby thesis Use documents Tie your argument to your evidence



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1st period:

Body Paragraphs:

  1. Baby thesis

  2. Use documents

  3. Tie your argument to your evidence

No:

In the case of DLK, the government did not go too far by taking a thermal image scan of the home. The thermal image scans are not considered a search because Document E states that “the use of the thermal imager in this case was not a Fourth Amendment search.” If this is not a search, than the Fourth Amendment cannot have been violated because the Fourth Amendment is defined as, “

Yes:

In the case of DLK, law enforcement used a thermal imager to scan the exterior of DLK’s home without a warrant, therefore violating his Fourth amendment rights. In Document F Justice Scalia clearly states that, “the surveillance is a search and is… unreasonable without a warrant.”



3rd period:

Body Paragraphs:

  1. Baby thesis

  2. Use documents

  3. Tie your argument to your evidence

No:

Taking a thermal image of a home is not a search, therefore the fourth amendment rights of DLK have not been violated. Document E clearly states, “The use of the thermal imager in this case is not a Fourth Amendment search.” The government did not go too far by taking an image of the exterior of the home (Document C) because it was clearly not a search, and could not be considered part of the Fourth Amendment.

Yes:

The image taken with the thermal scanner was a search, therefore it violated DLK’s Fourth Amendment rights. Justice Scalia stated in Document F that “Details of the home that would previously have been unknowable without the surveillance is a search and is… unreasonable without a warrant.” The Fourth Amendment is in place to protect against unreasonable searches and seizures; by taking these images without a warrant, they have clearly violated the rights of DLK.



INTRODUCTION:

Hook:

Background w/ key terms defined:

Thesis:

Do you feel that your privacy is being violated when you go through airport security scanners? How is that any different than “scanning” a home? This is exactly what happened in the case of DLK versus the United States.

The Fourth Amendment says that you have an expectation of privacy in your home and person.” (Background Essay) This amendment protects individuals against unreasonable searches and seizures. In the case of DLK versus the United States, DLK felt his Fourth Amendment rights were violated when law enforcement took thermal images of his home to detect heat without a warrant. Based on this information, law enforcement was able to obtain a warrant and upon finding marijuana growing in his home, he was arrested.

4th PERIOD:

Body Paragraphs:


  1. Baby thesis

  2. Use documents

  3. Tie your argument to your evidence

YES:

The government went too far in the case of DLK because law enforcement used a thermal imager to search without a warrant, by using this technology, they invade the privacy of DLK, and as per precedent cases, and there is a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment.



NO:

The government did not go too far in the case of DLK because thermal images are not a search, the images taken do not violate the privacy of DLK, and this type of technology is in place to keep people safe.



5th PERIOD:

Body Paragraphs:

  1. Baby thesis

  2. Use documents

  3. Tie your argument to your evidence

YES:

In the case of DLK, his Fourth amendment rights were violated because they did not get a warrant to take the thermal images of his home. Justice Scalia stated in Document F that “the surveillance is a search and is… unreasonable without a warrant.” Law enforcement clearly violated the rights of DLK by taking images of his home without a warrant (Document C).



NO:

In the case of DLK, his Fourth amendment rights were not violated because they did not conduct an actual search. Justice Stevens stated in Document F that “The officers’ conduct did not amount to a search and was perfectly reasonable…” DLK cannot claim his Fourth Amendment rights were violated if a search did not occur.



6th PERIOD:

Body Paragraphs:

  1. Baby thesis

  2. Use documents

  3. Tie your argument to your evidence

NO:

In the case of DLK, there was no violation of his Fourth Amendment rights because the use of a thermal imager is not a search. Justice Stevens stated in Document F that “The officers’ conduct did not amount to a search and was perfectly reasonable…” Also, it says “The use of the thermal imager in this case is not a Fourth Amendment search” (Document E). The government did not go too far by taking images of the exterior of the home (Document C) because it was not a search, therefore did not violate the Fourth Amendment.



YES:

In the case of DLK, his Fourth Amendment rights were violated because a thermal imager was used to take pictures of his home without a warrant. Justice Scalia stated in Document F that “the surveillance is a search and is… unreasonable without a warrant.” The Fourth Amendment is in place to protect against unreasonable searches and seizures; by taking these images of DLK’s home without a warrant, they have clearly violated his rights (Document C).

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