Lesson Plans – Subject to Change



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Lesson Plans – Subject to Change

U.S. History 8th Grade Flores, Green, Halter

Week : 08/29/16 to 09/02/16

Unit : 2

Duration: 1week

*** Due to Testing this week the DBQ essay will be due on Thursday**

Standard(s):



Focus Standards for the Unit

  1. SS.8.A.2.2 Compare the characteristics of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies. Examples may include, but are not limited to, colonial governments, geographic influences, occupations, religion, education, settlement patterns, and social patterns.

  2. SS.8.A.2.3 Differentiate economic systems of New England, Middle and Southern colonies including indentured servants and slaves as labor sources. Examples may include, but are not limited to, subsistence farming, cash crop farming, and maritime industries.

  3. SS.8.A.2.4 Identify the impact of key colonial figures on the economic, political, and social development of the colonies. Examples may include, but are not limited to, John Smith, William Penn, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, John Winthrop, Jonathan Edwards, William Bradford, Nathaniel Bacon, John Peter Zenger, and Lord Calvert.

  4. SS.8.A.2.5 Discuss the impact of colonial settlement on Native American populations. Examples may include, but are not limited to, war, disease, loss of land, westward displacement of tribes causing increased conflict between tribes, and dependence on trade for Western goods, including guns.

  5. SS.8.A.2.6 Examine the causes, course, and consequences of the French and Indian War. Examples may include, but are not limited to, ongoing conflict between France and England, territorial disputes, trade competition, Ft. Duquesne, Ft. Quebec, Treaty of Paris, heavy British debt.

  1. SS.8.A.2.7 Describe the contributions of key groups (Africans, Native Americans, women, and children) to the society and culture of colonial America.






Learning Goal:




Students will be able to compare and contrast the geography, economy, and religious values of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.











Essential Question







  1. How did the English start colonies with distinct qualities in North America?

  2. Why was the Mayflower Compact a turning point in colonial settlement?

  3. How did religious beliefs and dissent shape the culture of the British colonies?

  4. In what ways were Native American populations in the colonies affected by British settlement?

  5. How did geographic factors drive the economies of the Northern, Middle, and Southern colonies?

  6. How did various groups (men, women, indentured servants, etc.) influence colonial life?









HOT Question(s)

  1. Was colonial America a democratic society?

  2. Was slavery the basis of freedom in colonial America?

  3. Did Great Britain lose more than it gained from its victory in the French and Indian War?

  4. Were the colonists justified in resisting British policies after the French and Indian War?

  5. Was the American War for Independence inevitable?



Assessment:

Students will create a foldable and write an essay that addresses the following standards:

SS.8.A.2.2 Compare the characteristics of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies

SS.8.A.2.3 Differentiate economic systems of New England, Middle and Southern colonies including indentured servants and slaves as labor sources

SS.8.A.2.4 Identify the impact of key colonial figures on the economic, political, and social development of the colonies

Key Vocabulary

New England, Middle, and Southern colonies, indentured servants, slaves as labor sources, John Smith, William Penn, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, John Winthrop, Jonathan Edwards, William Bradford, Nathaniel Bacon, John Peter Zenger, and Lord Calvert, Native Americans, French and Indian War, Ft. Duquesne, Ft. Quebec, Treaty of Paris, African Americans, women



Monday- Wednesday

AUGUST 29th -31th

SS.8.A.1.1 Provide supporting details for an answer from the text. Examples: Students should be encouraged to utilize FINDS (Focus, Investigate, Note, Develop, Score)

:SS.8.A.1.2 Analyze charts, graphs, maps, photographs, and timelines; analyze political cartoons: determine cause and effects

SS.8.A.1.5 Identify, within both primary and secondary resources, the author, audience, format, and purpose of significant historical documents. SS.8.A.1.6 Compare interpretations of key events and issues throughout American History. Examples may include, but are not limited to, historiography. SS.8.A.1.7 View historic events through the eyes of those who were there as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts.


COMPLETE FINAL DRAFT OF THE DBQ ESSAY “ END PRODUCT” UNIT ONE

Daily Agenda

Daily Objective

Students will write their final draft of their “END PRODUCT” the DBQ Essay.

Bell Ringer

(Anticipate)

What have you learned about European exploration? Did anything surprise you? Which vocabulary words are you able to define?

What are the non-negotiable’s of a DBQ?



I DO:

Review expectations for writing a DBQ

WE DO:

Students will work on their Thinking Maps and 5 paragraph Essay

You DO:

Write the “END PRODUCT” or final draft of the DBQ on European Exploration

Using the FSA rubric students will grade each other’s papers before they turn it in to the teacher



Exit Ticket

(Reflection)

Students will write until bell rings no exit ticket.



Thursday, September 1, 2016

Benchmark:

Unpacking the Standards

Daily Agenda

Daily Objective

Students will unpack the standards for Unit 2

ANTICIPATE

( Bell ringer)

Create a Circle Thinking Map. In the middle write Colonial America. Then write down anything you can think of when America was in its infancy. (people, events, tools, geography , places, clothing)

Then write a one paragraph summary.



I DO:

I will explain how to properly unpack the standards for unit 2.

WE DO:

Students will follow along in their 5 subject notebook as we unpack standards as a class.

You DO:

Students will Unpack the Standards by writing the standard word for word, Completing a T-Chart for standards listing the, Knows and the Do’s. Student will then write standards in their own words.

REFLECT:

(Exit Ticket

Why is it important to know how America began?






Standards:

Benchmark: SS.8.A.2.2 Compare the characteristics of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies. Examples may include, but are not limited to, colonial governments, geographic influences, occupations, religion, education, settlement patterns, and social patterns.

SS.8.A.2.3 Differentiate economic systems of New England, Middle and Southern colonies including indentured servants and slaves as labor sources. Examples may include, but are not limited to, subsistence farming, cash crop farming, and maritime industries.

  1. SS.8.A.2.4 Identify the impact of key colonial figures on the economic, political, and social development of the colonies. Examples may include, but are not limited to, John Smith, William Penn, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, John Winthrop, Jonathan Edwards, William Bradford, Nathaniel Bacon, John Peter Zenger, and Lord Calvert.

SS.8.A.2.5 Discuss the impact of colonial settlement on Native American populations. Examples may include, but are not limited to, war, disease, loss of land, westward displacement of tribes causing increased conflict between tribes, and dependence on trade for Western goods, including guns

Students will begin studying Colonial America by analyzing how the Jamestown Colony survived.

Friday, September 2, 2016 Daily Agenda

Daily Objective

Students will begin studying Colonial America by completing a map of the 13 colonies. Students will begin working on Level 1 of the Unit 2 pathways

ANTICIPATE

( Bell ringer)

Students will analyze a political cartoon. Students will need to explain what is going on in the cartoon in 1 paragraph

I DO:

I will explain what made up the New England Colonies. Students will take notes from direct instruction

WE DO:

Students will work on their Level 1 assignments in groups

You DO:

Students will complete the Level 1 assignment for individual grade.

REFLECT:

(Exit Ticket

Explain how level 1 will help you full understand more about the 13 colonies.

Unit: 2

Scale #

Requirements for Level

4

LEVEL 4: 

Students will be able to compare and contrast the geography, economy, and religious values of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.







3

LEVEL 3

Evaluate the goals and competition for colonization 

Compare and contrast Spanish, French, and English colonization in the New World 

Compare and contrast early settlements in the New World: Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth. 

Evaluate how Native American populations were impacted by colonial settlement 

Compare and contrast colonial regions in regards to location and climate, economy, social life, and political and civic life. 


Evaluate colonial life in respect to the different groups that settled in distinct regions 

Compare and contrast the colonial experience between large landowners, farmers, artisans, women and Native Americas 

Evaluate the goals of mercantilism 

Compare and contrast the colonial experience between slaves and indentured servants 

Evaluate the experience/perspective of African Americans arriving in the New World 



2

LEVEL 2: Students will: 

  1. Define colonization 

  1. Describe Spanish, French, and English settlements in the Americas 

  1. Identify early English colonies 

  1. Understand how colonists and Native Americans interacted 

  1. Understand the characteristics of colonial regions 

  1. Differentiate the colonial regions gaining understanding of each specific location and climate, economy, social life, and political and civic life.  

  1. Describe how colonial life differentiated between large landowners, farmers, artisans, women and Native Americas  

  1. Define mercantilism 

  1. Understand the triangular trade, slavery, and indentured servitude 

Understand slavery and the middle passage 

1

LEVEL 1:  With help, a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and process (Level 2 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Level 3). 

0

LEVEL 0:  Even with help, no understanding 

Notes: Lesson Plans are subject to change.

WICR Strategies used during each unit.

Writing

Writing activities that help

students understand the

content


Inquiry

Questioning strategies

that help students

understand the content



Collaboration

Working together with a

partner or in a group of

students to understand, to

problem solve, or to

complete a task/project



Reading

Any strategies in reading

that help students

understand



Writing-to-Learn

• summaries



Process writing

• using a rubric as evaluation



On-demand/Timed writing

• writing that is completed in class within a set amount of time

• grade is evaluated using a rubric

Cornell Notes

• taking notes on the most important information

• summarizing

using the notes to study



Reflective writing

• students write about what they have learned and what they still need



Higher level questioning

in classes

• Costa’s Level 1: Students

find the answers right there

in the text.


• Costa’s Level 2: Students

must figure out the answer

from information in the

text.
• Costa’s Level 3: Students

apply what they have

learned or use what they

have learned to evaluate or

create.


Think Pair Share
Sharing ideas with a

partner or in a group
Carousel/Gallery Walk
Problem solving in groups
Projects in groups


Before reading activities

• vocabulary activities

• accessing prior knowledge

• making predictions


During reading activities

• marking the text

• Cornell notes

graphic organizers


After reading strategies

• summarizing



• group projects

Accommodations used daily on an individual basis in accordance with IEP and 504 plans and ELL Students

  • Read directions for the student

  • Check for understanding

  • Allow to leave class for assistance

  • Extra time for exams

  • Daily agenda

  • Allow student time to step out to de-escalate

  • Testing in small groups

  • Use of a planner/binder for organization

  • English Language Dictionary

  • Extended time on assignments =1 day

  • Preferential seating

  • Written direction given

  • Break directions into chunks

  • Read Aloud to Students

  • Visual manipulatives

  • Cooperative Learning,

  • Vocabulary, Description, Introduction,

.


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