Constructing a Problem-Solution Essay Subject: Horses Difference Between a Topic and a Thesis



Download 7.87 Kb.
Date07.01.2017
Size7.87 Kb.
#6883

Constructing a Problem-Solution Essay

Subject: Horses

Difference Between a Topic and a Thesis

  • Wild horses
  • Wild horses and burros in the West
  • Wild horses and burros now in the West
  • Wild horses now in the West which have been rounded up (a protected species)
  • Policy of the BLM to round up and confine wild horses and burros in the West
  • Argument: IT’S A BAD POLICY!

Why is this a problem?

  • Over thirty thousand wild horses and burros which have been rounded up in the West are kept now in confined conditions; less than 50% of the horses typically find homes with private individuals.
  • Problem: Inappropriate treatment of mustangs and burros: “It’s inhumane.”
  • Point of view: Humane Society (treatment of animals) and its supporters

Why is this a problem?

  • Over thirty thousand wild horses and burros which have been rounded up in the West are kept now in confined conditions; less than 50% of the horses typically find homes with private individuals. They are costing taxpayers a lot of money.
  • Problem: Cost to the taxpayers of taking care of these mustangs and burros
  • Point of view: GAO, federal government officials, BLM, taxpayers (fiscal)

Background

  • According to the Humane Society Website, the policy of the BLM was designed “to protect wild horses and burros on the range and maintain them as symbols of American culture” (Parcelle). The HSUS claims the policy thus “has strayed far from its original purpose” (Parcelle).
  • Source cited here and listed at the end of the paper: Wayne Parcelle, CEO, Humane Society Website.

First Solution: Dinner?

First Proposed Solution: Slaughter the horses

  • Canada still has many slaughterhouses which prepare horse meat for consumption by animals and humans.
  • Advantages: Little cost to the taxpayers, maybe even financial benefits. It will please some of our neighbors who want the product.
  • Disadvantages: Violates the “original purpose” of the BLM policy (Parcelle). It will anger some people greatly and contribute to an economy dealing in potentially unsafe foods.

Second Proposed Solution: More humane and better management

  • Instead of taking so many horses off the range, BLM should institute several measures: “expand fertility control,” allow the animals to roam public lands, and adopt out more of the horses and burros (Parcelle).
  • HSUS supports this. Better for the animals and less cost to taxpayers.

Drawbacks?

  • Difficult in this economy to adopt out animals which are expensive and need so much care
  • Slower process of controlling the size of herds
  • Still requires funding by federal government (private grants help, however)
  • Annoys those who see no point to preserving these animal anyway
  • BUT it is a long-term and humane solution

Thesis Statement

  • Mismanagement of wild horses and burros in the West has led to inhumane treatment of the animals and high costs for taxpayers. Some have suggested that a good solution is to slaughter the animals which are now confined in cramped conditions. A better solution--for both the horses and for taxpayers—is better herd management: more active fertility plans and adoption programs and less rounding up of so many horses.

Works Cited

  • Parcelle, Wayne. “House Passes Wild Horse
  • and Burro Protections.” Humane Society of the United States. July 17, 2009. September 3, 2009.
  • 2009/07/wild-horses.html>

Question

  • What is the problem with using just this one source--even if the assignment does not call for more sources?
  • What other sources does this argument point you toward?

Addendum

  • In October 2009, the BML put forth a plan to better handle the increasing numbers of wild horses and burros; parts of the plan have been instituted which follow suggestions put forth by the Humane Society and respond to people’s concerns. There are still issues, however, with the “gathering” procedures and the confinement of the animals. For details, see Bob Abbey’s description of these issues on the BLM Website:
  • http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/whbprogram/history_and_facts/director.html

Structure

  • State the problem
  • Remember that you want to show how it affects others, not just yourself. But you may want to develop a local angle in a short essay.
  • Explore background, causes, effects, etc. Here you are answering questions, like “Why?” or
  • “How?”
  • Examine possible solutions
  • Conclude with argument for your solution

Sources

  • Use the best sources available. Know who is responsible for content and examine that person’s background and purpose. If it is a corporate author, consider the goals of the organization. Examine the evidence.
  • If you start with newpapers or materials directed toward a general audience, pay attention to possible experts interviewed or referred to in the articles. Follow up on those.

Remember Aristotle?

  • Good arguments use these appeals:
  • Ethical Appeal (authority and credentials, good person writing well)
  • Logical Appeal (rational, substantive evidence)
  • Emotional Appeal (moves the audience)

Opposing View

  • Remember
  • Your essay must include consideration of a strong argument on the other side.
  • You must use a source that favors the opposing viewpoint for your argument on the other side.
  • You must refute the opposing argument by showing problems with evidence, logic, or other issues.
  • You can concede some points.

Find Common Ground

  • Locate values we can all agree on and use those to establish a relationship with your audience. Recognize your opponents’ good will. Provide a foundation to build upon.
  • We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.


Download 7.87 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2022
send message

    Main page