University of kent code of practice for quality assurance module specification template



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UNIVERSITY OF KENT – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE

MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE



  1. The title of the module: Gods of the Desert: Judaism and Islam

  2. The Department which will be responsible for management of the module: Religious Studies

  3. The Start Date of the Module: January 2009

  4. The number of students expected to take the module: 30-40 (no maximum quota)

  5. Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with other relevant Departments and Faculties regarding the withdrawal: N/A

  6. The level of the module: Certificate [C]

  7. The number of credits which the module represents: 15 (7.5 ECTs)

  8. Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern): Term 2

  9. Prerequisite and co-requisite modules: None

  10. The programmes of study to which the module contributes: Religious Studies (BA) and Joint Honours with Religious Studies (BA). It may also be taken as a ‘wild’ module.

  11. The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes:

By the end of this module, students should be able to:




  1. assess the importance of the Jewish and Islamic faiths for believers today;

  2. show knowledge of the history, thought, culture and scriptures of these two monotheistic faiths;

  3. appreciate what it means to be a Jew or Muslim today;

  4. understand the meaning of religious beliefs and practices in the two faiths;

  5. understand the broad historical development of Jewish and Muslim religion.




  1. The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes:

By the end of the module students should be able to have:

  1. enhanced their communication skills such as responding to written sources from the two religious traditions studied, presented information orally through class presentations, organised information in a clear and coherent fashion and developed writing and organizing skills through an initial essay and a pre-seen timed test;

  2. worked cooperatively with others in the group on seminar tasks and defined and reviewed the work of others;

  3. improved their own learning and performance by applying methodological, hermeneutical, historiographical and sociological perspectives to the study of religion.



  1. A synopsis of the curriculum:

This course investigates the beliefs and practices of Jews and Muslims in the world today. Topics in Judaism include the life and work of the Patriarchs, the concept of the 'chosen people', the Promised Land, the Torah, synagogue, Jewish festivals and the Jewish home. In the case of Islam, topics include the life and work of Muhammad, the Five Pillars, the Qur'an and Hadith, Sunni and Shi'ite Muslims, Sufism, the Shariah and the Islamic contribution to the arts and sciences.

  1. Indicative Reading List:

Highly Recommended

Aslan, Reza, No God But God: The Origins, Evolution and Future of Islam, Arrow, 2006.

Close, Brian, Judaism, London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1991.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan & Lavinia, Judaism: A Short Introduction, Oxford: Oneworld, 1999.

Maqsood, Ruqaiyyah Waris, Teach Yourself Islam. Teach Yourself Books, Hodder & Stoughton, 1994.

Robinson, Neal, Islam: a concise introduction, London: Routledge, 1998.

Seltzer, Robert M, Judaism: A People and its History, MacMillan, 1989.

Recommended

Encyclopaedia Judaica 16 vols, Jerusalem: Keter Publishing House, 1972.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan, Holocaust Theology, Lamp Press, 1989.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan, The Jewish Faith, SPCK, 1993.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan & Lavinia, A Short Reader in Judaism, Oxford: Oneworld, 1996.

de Lange, Nicholas, Judaism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Johnson, Paul, A History of The Jews, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1998.

Küng, Hans, Judaism: the religious situation of our time, SCM, 1992.

Pilkington, C.M. Teach Yourself Judaism, Hodder, 2003.

Sachar, Howard, The Course of Modern Jewish History, Random House, 1991.
Ahmed, Akbar, Living Islam, London: BBC Books, 1993.

Palmer, Martin & Brown, Kerry, The Essential Teachings of Islam, London, 1990.

Clarke, P. (ed) The World's Religions: Islam, London: Routledge, 1990.

Cook, Michael, Muhammad, O.U.P., 1983.

Endress, Gerhard, An Introduction to Islam, Edinburgh University Press, 2002.

Esposito, John, Islam - The Straight Path, Oxford: OUP, 2004.

Jomier, Jacques, How to understand Islam, Crossroad, 2006.

Lewis, Bernard (ed.), The World of Islam, London: Thames & Hudson, 1992.

Mater, Nabil, Islam For Beginners, Steerforth: 2008.

Ruthven, Malise, Islam in the World, Granta, 2006.

Zakaria, Rafiq, Muhammad and the Quran, London: Penguin, 1991.

Zepp, Ira G, A Muslim Primer - Beginner's Guide To Islam, University of Arkansas, 2000.



  1. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of the intended learning outcomes:

Weekly one-hour lecture and one-hour seminar (33 contact hours in total allowing for a reading week in the middle of the semester). The total number of study hours expected of students will be 10 per week, although that figure should not be regarded as a maximum. As a proportion of time spent on the module, the following is proposed:


Lectures 15%

Seminars 15%

Directed Learning 70%
The mixture of lectures and seminars is designed to help students achieve the learning outcomes. Lectures and seminars are important to enable students to assess the importance of the Jewish and Islamic faiths (outcome a), show knowledge of the history, thought, culture and scriptures of the three monotheistic faiths (outcome b), appreciate what it means to be a Jew or Muslim today (outcome c), understand the meaning of religious beliefs and practices in the three faiths (outcome d) and understand the broad historical development of Jewish and Muslim religion (outcome e). Seminars will enable students to enhance their oral skills through class presentations (outcomes f and g), and directed learning will enable students to learn key skills from applying methodological, hermeneutical, historiographical and sociological perspectives to the study of religion (outcome h) as well as develop writing and organizing skills through an initial essay and a timed test (outcome f).


  1. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended learning outcomes:

Assessment will consist of the following:

60% essay, 30% timed test, 10% seminar performance.
The assessment enables students to learn key skills (all outcomes) in a form that can be assessed reliably by both internal and external examiners. All assignments are assessed using a template which marks: understanding of topic and relevance of answer; structure of argument and organization; critical ability and independence of thought; detailed information and accuracy; presentation and clarity of expression, including spelling and grammar; appropriate use of sources, primary and secondary; bibliography and references; and originality and creativity.
17 Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space:

I can confirm that most of the books are either presently in the library or will be acquired for the library in due course. Regarding staff resources, the module will be convened by Dr Angela Voss and taught by appropriate staff and sessional teachers. In the 2007-08 academic year, a version of this module was taught by Dr Stephen Laird and Dr Duane Williams with the assistance of Danielle Shalet (M.Phil. student).


18 As far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities.
Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching: "I confirm I have been consulted on the above module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of module proposals"

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Director of Learning and Teaching


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Date



Statement by the Head of Department: "I confirm that the Department has approved the introduction of the module and will be responsible for its resourcing"

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Head of Department


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Date





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