The Accelerated Learning Program The Community College of Baltimore County



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  • The Community College of Baltimore County
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 100%
  • 75%
  • 50%
  • 25%
  • 0%
  • Success rates for students
  • who took ENGL 052 in 88-89
  • How We First Measured Success in Our Developmental Courses
  • 100%
  • 75%
  • 50%
  • 25%
  • 0%
  • U or W
  • ENGL 052
  • 373
  • 43%
  • Success rates for students
  • who passed ENGL 052 in 88-89
  • and then took ENGL 101 by sp 92
  • DFW in
  • ENGL 101
  • 68
  • 19%
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • took 052
  • 1988/1989
  • 863
  • 100%
  • Students who took ENG 052 for the first time in 1988/1989
  • took 101
  • 355
  • 41%
  • took no
  • more writing
  • courses
  • 135
  • 16%
  • S in 052
  • 490
  • 57%
  • never
  • passed 052
  • 373
  • 43%
  • A, B, or C
  • in 101
  • 287
  • 33%
  • D, F, or W
  • in 101
  • 68
  • 8%
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • Why Do Students Drop Out?
    • can’t write a thesis
    • no concrete examples
    • sentence fragments
    • confusing words
    • subject-verb agreement
    • mla format
    • none of the above
    • eviction
    • car trouble
    • changes at work
    • financial problems
    • abusive situation at home
    • medical problems
    • problems with children
    • laid off
    • legal problems
    • life happens
    • student becomes discouraged
    • student becomes depressed
    • student feels isolated
    • student loses confidence
    • stress becomes too great
    • student fears she isn’t “college material”
    • affective issues
    • life
    • issues
    • affective
    • issues
    • non-
    • cognitive
    • issues
  • 100%
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 70%
  • pass
  • 70%
  • take
  • 70%
  • pass
  • 70%
  • tale
  • 70%
  • pass
  • =
  • 8%
  • three
  • levels
  • down
  • one
  • level
  • down
  • two
  • levels
  • down
  • 70%
  • take
  • gate-
  • way
  • course
  • 70%
  • pass
  • 100%
  • The Pipeline Effect
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 100%
  • pass
  • 70%
  • take
  • 70%
  • pass
  • 70%
  • tale
  • 70%
  • pass
  • =
  • 12%
  • three
  • levels
  • down
  • one
  • level
  • down
  • two
  • levels
  • down
  • 70%
  • take
  • gate-
  • way
  • course
  • 70%
  • pass
  • 100%
  • The Pipeline Effect
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 80%
  • pass
  • 80%
  • take
  • 80%
  • pass
  • 80%
  • tale
  • 80%
  • pass
  • =
  • 21%
  • three
  • levels
  • down
  • one
  • level
  • down
  • two
  • levels
  • down
  • 80%
  • take
  • gate-
  • way
  • course
  • 80%
  • pass
  • 100%
  • The Pipeline Effect
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 90%
  • pass
  • 90%
  • take
  • 90%
  • pass
  • 90%
  • tale
  • 90%
  • pass
  • =
  • 48%
  • three
  • levels
  • down
  • one
  • level
  • down
  • two
  • levels
  • down
  • 90%
  • take
  • gate-
  • way
  • course
  • 90%
  • pass
  • Agenda for the Day
  • Overview of ALP
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
    • What Is the Problem?
    • What is ALP?
    • What Results has ALP produced?
    • What about Costs?
  • A
  • CCBC Students
  • average age
  • 29
  • female/male
  • 58/42%
  • students of color
  • 50%
  • full/part-time
  • 34/66 %
  • Community College Baltimore County
  • credit students
  • 33,817
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 50%
  • Placement into Dev ED
  • 75%
  • 25%
  • 100%
  • 81%
  • English
  • all students
  • math
  • reading
  • 77%
  • 65%
  • 58%
  • RDG
  • 051
  • RDG
  • 052
  • MATH
  • 081
  • MATH
  • 082
  • MATH
  • 083
  • ENGL
  • 051
  • ENGL
  • 052
  • ENGL
  • 101
  • ENGL
  • 102
  • CCBC’s Developmental Education Courses:
  • ENG 101
  • ENG 052
  • ALP
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • encourages cohort effect
  • changes attitude toward developmental course
  • allows individual attention
  • allows time for non-cog issues
  • allows coordination of the two courses
  • reduces stigma
  • improves attachment
  • provides stronger role models
  • How does an ALP developmental class
  • differ from a traditional one?
  • Goal of a traditional developmental course:
  • Goal of an ALP developmental course:
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • for
  • students to pass the developmental course.
  • for
  • students to pass first-year composition course.
  • passed
  • ENG 052
  • 485
  • 82%
  • didn’t
  • pass
  • ENG 052
  • 107
  • 18%
  • took
  • ENG 052
  • Fa07-Fa10
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took
  • ENG 101
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took no
  • more writing
  • courses
  • 0
  • 0%
  • traditional developmental students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • ALP students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • data from Cho, Kopko, & Jenkins, 2012 (CCRC)
  • traditional developmental students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • passed
  • ENG 052
  • 485
  • 82%
  • didn’t
  • pass
  • ENG 052
  • 107
  • 18%
  • took
  • ENG 052
  • Fa07-Fa10
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took
  • ENG 101
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took no
  • more writing
  • courses
  • 0
  • 0%
  • ALP students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • passed
  • ENG 101
  • 438
  • 74%
  • didn’t
  • pass
  • ENG 101
  • 154
  • 26%
  • data from Cho, Kopko, & Jenkins, 2012 (CCRC)
  • passed
  • ENG 102
  • 195
  • 33%
  • haven’t passed ENG102
  • 101
  • 17%
  • passed
  • ENG 102
  • 554
  • 10%
  • F, I, or W
  • in
  • ENG102
  • 167
  • 3%
  • took
  • ENG 102
  • 296
  • 50%
  • haven’t
  • taken
  • ENG 102
  • 142
  • 24%
  • took
  • ENG 102
  • 721
  • 13%
  • haven’t
  • taken
  • ENG 102
  • 1109
  • 20%
  • passed
  • ENG 052
  • 485
  • 82%
  • didn’t
  • pass
  • ENG 052
  • 107
  • 18%
  • took
  • ENG 052
  • Fa07-Fa10
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took
  • ENG 101
  • 592
  • 100%
  • took no
  • more writing
  • courses
  • 0
  • 0%
  • passed
  • ENG 101
  • 438
  • 74%
  • didn’t
  • pass
  • ENG 101
  • 154
  • 26%
  • traditional developmental students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • ALP students:
  • fall 2007 –
  • fall 2010
  • data from Cho, Kopko, & Jenkins, 2012 (CCRC)
  • Developmental Writing 65%
  • CCBC’s Developmental Writing Courses:
  • Credit English 35%
  • 13%
  • ALP 87%
  • 50%
  • Pass Rates in 101 for Low Scoring and High Scoring Students
  • 75%
  • 25%
  • 100%
  • traditional dev writing
  • 47%
  • fall 2010
  • 56%
  • 60-69
  • 80-89
  • ALP
  • 24%
  • 37%
  • 84%
  • 80%
  • Accuplacer Scores:
  • 2009-10
  • 2007-08
  • 2008-09
  • 160 students
  • 20 sections
  • 640
  • students
  • 80 sections
  • 2010-11
  • 320
  • students
  • 40 sections
  • 80
  • students
  • 2011-12
  • 1280
  • students
  • 160 sections
  • Students take their developmental writing course concurrently with the credit-level writing course, rather than as a pre-requisite.
  • At least half the students in the credit English course are students who placed into credit-level writing.
  • The ALP cohort is no more than 12 students.
  • ALP instructors recognize the importance of paying attention to the non-cognitive issues affecting their students.
  • The same instructor teaches the ALP course and the credit course.
  • The pedagogy in the ALP course is based on “backward design” from the credit course and emphasizes active learning, improved reasoning skills, engaged reading, and more effective editing skills.
  • Critical Features of ALP
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • Agenda for the Day
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • Developmental Writing at CCBC
  • ENG 101
  • reading college-level
  • texts
  • and
  • writing college-level essays
  • ENG 052
  • writing
  • paragraphs
  • ENG 051
  • sentence
  • skills
  • ENG 050
  • the
  • word
  • reading college-level
  • texts
  • and
  • writing college-level essays
  • reading college-level
  • texts
  • and
  • writing college-level essays
  • Agenda for the Day
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • Agenda for the Day
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • 12th Grade American History
  • Take-Home Exam
  • In an essay of 500 words or more, explain the causes of the Civil War.
  • slavery
  • states rights vs. federalism
  • economic and social differences
  • The Causes of the Civil War
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • slavery
  • states rights vs. federalism
  • economic and social differences
  • the South read too much of Sir Walter Scott
  • The Causes of the Civil War
  • F
  • Thesis
  • Reason #1
  • Reason #2
  • Reason #3
  • Conclusion
  • Assignment: Write an essay of at least three double-spaced pages in which you tell me one interesting thing about the kind of person you are.
  • Short Writing 1
  • One thing that best describes me is that I am a very outgoing person.
  • I am a thoughtful to my grandmother.
  • I would like to consider myself a somewhat outgoing person.
  • I have always been a determined person.
  • I like to meet new people and make new friends.
  • I'm very outgoing.
  • I am very ambitious because I am afraid of failing.
  • I want to do well in school.
  • My desire to help other people is really selfish at heart.
  • There are many characteristics that I have. However the one that I think sticks out the most would have to be that I am giving.
  • I am a very outgoing person because I am afraid to be alone.
  • The type of person that I happen to be is a good person.
  • One trait about me that sticks out and can easily be connected to me, is how creative I am.
  • I am a very adventurous person,
  • The majority of people I asked said I am caring.
  • I am a generous person, but I am not a fool.
  • I am something of a chameleon.
  • I feel an important thing to know about myself is that I am ambitious.
  • I have been described as many things, adventurous being one of them.
  • I am a very generous person.
  • Some Theses from Paper 1
  • One thing that best describes me is that I am a very outgoing person.
  • I am a thoughtful to my grandmother.
  • I would like to consider myself a somewhat outgoing person.
  • I have always been a determined person.
  • I like to meet new people and make new friends.
  • I'm very outgoing.
  • I am very ambitious because I am afraid of failing.
  • I want to do well in school.
  • My desire to help other people is really selfish at heart.
  • There are many characteristics that I have. However the one that I think sticks out the most would have to be that I am giving.
  • I am a very outgoing person because I am afraid to be alone.
  • The type of person that I happen to be is a good person.
  • One trait about me that sticks out and can easily be connected to me, is how creative I am.
  • I am a very adventurous person,
  • The majority of people I asked said I am caring.
  • I am a generous person, but I am not a fool.
  • I am something of a chameleon.
  • I feel an important thing to know about myself is that I am ambitious.
  • I have been described as many things, adventurous being one of them.
  • I am a very generous person.
  • Some Theses from Paper 1
  • One thing that best describes me is that I am a very outgoing person.
  • I am a thoughtful to my grandmother.
  • I would like to consider myself a somewhat outgoing person.
  • I have always been a determined person.
  • I like to meet new people and make new friends.
  • I'm very outgoing.
  • I am very ambitious because I am afraid of failing.
  • I want to do well in school.
  • My desire to help other people is really selfish at heart.
  • There are many characteristics that I have. However the one that I think sticks out the most would have to be that I am giving.
  • I am a very outgoing person because I am afraid to be alone.
  • The type of person that I happen to be is a good person.
  • One trait about me that sticks out and can easily be connected to me, is how creative I am.
  • I am a very adventurous person,
  • The majority of people I asked said I am caring.
  • I am a generous person, but I am not a fool.
  • I am something of a chameleon.
  • I feel an important thing to know about myself is that I am ambitious.
  • I have been described as many things, adventurous being one of them.
  • I am a very generous person.
  • Some Theses from Paper 1
  • To solve this puzzle you must connect all nine dots while following these rules:
  •  
  • You may use up to four lines.
  • All lines must be straight.
  • You cannot lift your pen or pencil from the paper.
  • You cannot re-trace a line.
  • To solve this puzzle you must connect all nine dots while following these rules:
  •  
  • You may use up to four lines.
  • All lines must be straight.
  • You cannot lift your pen or pencil from the paper.
  • You cannot re-trace a line.
  • Why didn’t you figure out the answer?
  • Most people reply:
  • “You didn’t tell us we could go outside the nine dots.”
  • Assignment: Write a short paper, about a page, in which you propose who should get reserved parking spaces at the college. Be sure to provide evidence to support your assertions. The audience of this assignment is other students in this class.
  • Thesis: The disabled, the faculty, and the college President should get reserved parking.
  • the disabled to make life a little easier for them
  • the faculty because without them there would be no classes
  • the President as a recognition of her accomplishments
  • So reserved parking should go to the disabled, faculty, and the President
  • disabled
  • president
  • faculty
  • wheelchair
  • bound
  • hearing
  • impaired
  • dyslexic
  • stroke victims
  • pregnant
  • overweight
  • people with cystic fibrosis
  • elderly
  • mobility impaired
  • disabled
  • wheelchair
  • bound
  • stroke victims
  • overweight
  • people with cystic fibrosis
  • pregnant
  • elderly
  • mobility impaired
  • obese
  • obese
  • disabled
  • wheelchair
  • bound
  • stroke victims
  • people with cystic fibrosis
  • pregnant
  • elderly
  • mobility impaired
  • obese
  • disabled
  • wheelchair
  • bound
  • stroke victims
  • people with cystic fibrosis
  • pregnant
  • elderly
  • mobility impaired
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • faculty
  • faculty and staff who teach at more than one campus
  • staff
  • plant operations vehicles
  • people with disabilities
  • visitors to campus
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • honors students
  • students with a 3.5 GPA
  • the state champion volleyball team
  • the United Way lottery winner
  • people who drive hybrid cars
  • the president
  • the United Way lottery winner
  • people who drive hybrid cars
  • visitors to campus
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • honors students
  • students with a 3.5 GPA
  • the state champion volleyball team
  • the president
  • the president
  • honors students
  • visitors to campus
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • the state champion volleyball team
  • visitors to campus
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • Who should get reserved parking?
  • faculty
  • faculty and staff who teach at more than one campus
  • staff
  • plant operations vehicles
  • people with disabilities
  • To make it possible for
  • people to do their jobs
  • students with a 3.5 GPA
  • people who drive hybrid cars
  • the United Way lottery winner
  • To encourage certain behaviors
  • honors students
  • the state champion volleyball team
  • the president
  • To recognize
  • accomplishments
  • visitors to campus
  • Horses & Riders Puzzle
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • The Rules
  • Your task is to assemble the three pieces of papers in such a way that each rider is mounted on a horse.
  •  
  • Each rider must be placed in a logical position on his horse. (No riders hanging down underneath a horse’s stomach.)
  • You may not fold, cut, tear, or spindle the papers.
  • When the puzzle is completed, one must be able to see both riders and both horses.
  • Horses & Riders Puzzle
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • Agenda for the Day
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • Agenda for the Day
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • A German red small car was parked in front of my house.
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Effie was writing a blog
  • was
  • writing a blog.
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Move the auxiliary verb to the beginning of the sentence.
  • Effie was writing a blog
  • Was
  • writing a blog?
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Move the auxiliary verb to the beginning of the sentence.
  • Adjust capitalization and punctuation.
  • writes a blog.
  • Effie
  • do
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Move the auxiliary verb to the beginning of the sentence.
  • Insert “do.”
  • write a blog.
  • Effie
  • does
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Insert “do.”
  • Adjust subject verb agreement.
  • Move auxiliary verb to beginning of sentence.
  • write a blog?
  • Effie
  • Does
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Insert “do.”
  • Make “do” agree with subject.
  • Move auxiliary verb to beginning of sentence.
  • Adjust punctuation and capitalization.
  • Getting in Touch with Grammar 1
  • Peter, do you have any change?
  • In a standard handbook, to be able to avoid sentence fragments, here’s what a student is advised to do.
  • Before handing in a composition, proofread each word group written as a sentence. Test each one for completeness. First, be sure it has at least one subject and one verb. Next, be sure that the word group is not a dependent clause beginning with a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun.
  • Grammar Exercise Scores
  • 25
  • 45
  • 63
  • 68
  • 69
  • 72
  • 73
  • 79
  • 98
  • ENG 102 Honors
  • Grammar Exercise Scores
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 9
  • 10
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 15
  • 15
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 24
  • 24
  • 25
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 27
  • 27
  • 28
  • 28
  • 29
  • 29
  • 29
  • 35
  • 37
  • 41
  • 41
  • 47
  • 47
  • 52
  • 54
  • 1. One of the children had fallen and scraped her knee.
  • 2. Running about three miles a day is enough to stay in good shape.
  • 3. Opening his eyes, Sean realized he was not at home.
  • 4. Jason and Daniel turned off their cell phones and began to work on their computers.
  • 5. The top of my dining room table was covered with magazines when I arrived home.
  • 6. There was a crack in Tom's windshield.
  • 7. Jumping off of his bicycle, Mike ran up to the ticket office.
  • 8. To open that package will require a sharp knife.
  • 9. The front of Angela's house is painted white, but the rest is painted green.
  • 10. A few of these bananas are too ripe, but most of them are perfect.
  • 11. The window in our classroom was wide open, when we arrived.
  • 12. To see the game from our seats, we needed binoculars.
  • 13. Many of April's friends are in the Nursing Program.
  • 14. In my psychology class, we are learning about the unconscious.
  • 15. If Jennifer passes this exercise, she will be in good shape in this course.
  • 16. When I received my refund, it was much larger than I expected.
  • 17. To leave my ipod in the cafeteria was really stupid.
  • 18. Holding the injured bird, Julie tried to call her vet.
  • 19. Gabe and Robin have signed up for tutoring in the Writing Center, so they should do well on the next paper.
  • 20. If Michael had scored two points higher, he would have been excused from class on Monday.
  • Combine the following short sentences into one longer sentence. The new sentence should contain all the information contained in the shorter sentences below.
  • Set 1
  •  
  • My grandfather was a truly generous man.
  • My grandfather gave away all his money.
  • My grandfather left our family impoverished.
  •  
  • Combine the following short sentences into one longer sentence. The new sentence should contain all the information contained in the shorter sentences below.
  • Set 3
  •  
  • The price of gas has reached three dollars a gallon.
  • Juan’s car is seven years old.
  • Juan is my next-door neighbor.
  • Juan is going to buy a Prius.
  •  
  • True or False:
  • Their is four misteaks in this sentence.
  • Word Games
  • Why “I” is capitalized
  • any vs some
  • the German green small car
  • Their is four misteaks in this sentence.
  • difference between envy and jealousy
  • “it’s all downhill from here.” is that good or bad?
  • is zero singular or plural?
  • how many vs how much?
  • What is the word we use to refer to an entrance to an interstate highway?
  • Word Games
  • when to use “few;” when to use “less”
  • decapitated/capitated; deboned/boned; dethawed/thawed
  • what do “troops,” “pants,” and “scissors” have in common.
  • why is it “I am going to the library,” but not “I am going to the church.”
  • what is the rule for forming possessives: the queen’s of England carriage?
  • what is a steep learning curve?
  • Word Games
  • introduction to ALP
  • two fundamental principles
    • backward curriculum design
    • active learning
  • improving thinking skills
  • addressing non-cognitive issues
  • reducing sentence-level error
  • syllabus design
  • Agenda for the Day
  • A
  • L
  • P
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • week 1
  • day 1
  • week 1
  • day 2
  • week 2
  • day 1
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • discussion: intro to course
  • discussion: intro to SW1 (tell me one interesting thing about the kind of person you are), due before next class
  • group activity: discussing theses from SW1
  • group activity: discussion of all the thesis from SW1
  • week 1
  • day 1
  • week 1
  • day 2
  • week 2
  • day 1
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • discussion: intro to course
  • discussion: intro to SW1 (tell me one interesting thing about the kind of person you are), due before next class
  • group activity: discussing theses from SW1
  • group activity: discussion of all the thesis from SW1
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • ice breaker: getting acquainted
  • discussion: how to get started on a writing project
  • SWA students make a list of reasons why they are in a developmental writing course
  • discussion: why they are in development writing
  • week 1
  • day 1
  • week 1
  • day 2
  • week 2
  • day 1
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • discussion: intro to course
  • discussion: intro to SW1 (tell me one interesting thing about the kind of person you are), due before next class
  • group activity: discussing theses from SW1
  • group activity: discussion of all the thesis from SW1
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • ice breaker: getting acquainted
  • discussion: how to get started on a writing project
  • SWA students make a list of reasons why they are in a developmental writing course
  • discussion: why they are in development writing
  • group activity: discussing a bar chart
  • group activity: critiquing an example or two of SW1 by ALP students from the point of view of thesis and unity
  • week 1
  • day 1
  • week 1
  • day 2
  • week 2
  • day 1
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • discussion: intro to course
  • discussion: intro to SW1 (tell me one interesting thing about the kind of person you are), due before next class
  • group activity: discussing theses from SW1
  • group activity: discussion of all the thesis from SW1
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • ice breaker: getting acquainted
  • discussion: how to get started on a writing project
  • SWA students make a list of reasons why they are in a developmental writing course
  • discussion: why they are in development writing
  • group activity: discussing a bar chart
  • group activity: critiquing an example or two of SW1 by ALP students from the point of view of thesis and unity
  • SWB will ask students to write about someone they know who worked hard and, as a result, got ahead.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • week 3
  • day 1
  • week 3
  • day 2
  • week 4
  • day 1
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • group activity: students will examine a series of photos of the contents of the pockets of a man found unconscious
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • breath mints
  • Hilton Honors card
  • Continental Air frequent flyer card
  • he was disorganized
  • stimudents
  • Euros
  • he liked art
  • he cared about hygiene
  • laundry slip from June
  • he had an ATM card from August
  • he had a comb
  • Metropolitan Museum card
  • he drove a Volkswagen
  • Smithsonian Museum card
  • big tipper
  • Walters Art Museum card
  • liked to travel
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • week 3
  • day 1
  • week 3
  • day 2
  • week 4
  • day 1
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • group activity: students will examine a series of photos of the contents of the pockets of a man found unconscious
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • red
  • juicy
  • delicious
  • little green seeds
  • round
  • sweet smelling
  • plump
  • green stem and couple of leaves
  • whitish at bottom
  • white when you cut open
  • red
  • juicy
  • delicious
  • round
  • sweet smelling
  • plump
  • red
  • juicy
  • delicious
  • little green seeds
  • round
  • sweet smelling
  • plump
  • green stem and couple of leaves
  • whitish at bottom
  • white when you cut open
  • little green seeds
  • green stem and couple of leaves
  • whitish at bottom
  • white when you cut open
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • week 3
  • day 1
  • week 3
  • day 2
  • week 4
  • day 1
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • group activity: students will examine a series of photos of the contents of the pockets of a man found unconscious
  • group activity: using concrete and specific language; the strawberry activity
  • SW2: written in class, will ask students to describe the cafeteria.
  • Reading: first 48 pages of Henrietta Lacks for next Tuesday.
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • SWC: SWC will ask students to write about someone they know who worked hard and, nevertheless, did not get ahead.
  • discussion: discuss strengths and weaknesses of several examples of SWC
  • discussion: previewing and predicting Henrietta Lacks. Also, a discussion of voice in Henrietta Lacks.
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • week 3
  • day 1
  • week 3
  • day 2
  • week 4
  • day 1
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • group activity: students will examine a series of photos of the contents of the pockets of a man found unconscious
  • group activity: using concrete and specific language; the strawberry activity
  • SW2: written in class, will ask students to describe the cafeteria.
  • Reading: first 48 pages of Henrietta Lacks.
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • SWC: SWC will ask students to write about someone they know who worked hard and, nevertheless, did not get ahead.
  • discussion: discuss strengths and weaknesses of several examples of SWC
  • discussion: previewing and predicting Henrietta Lacks. Also, a discussion of voice in Henrietta Lacks.
  • group activity: discuss the first 48 pages of Henrietta Lacks.
  • Group 1: Johns Hopkins was a terribly racist institution.
  • Group 2: For the time, Hopkins was less racist than most institutions.
  • Group 3: The good that Hopkins did for the poor far outweighed any harm they did.
  • Group 4: The medical research Hopkins did was more important than their racist treatment of their patients.
  • week 2
  • day 2
  • week 3
  • day 1
  • week 3
  • day 2
  • week 4
  • day 1
  • Credit-Level Comp
  • Developmental ALP
  • group activity: students will examine a series of photos of the contents of the pockets of a man found unconscious
  • group activity: using concrete and specific language; the strawberry activity
  • SW2: written in class, will ask students to describe the cafeteria.
  • Reading: first 48 pages of Henrietta Lacks.
  • group activity: who should get reserved parking places. An exercise that encourages deeper thinking.
  • discussion: of SWBs and discuss what people thought the phrases “work hard” and “get ahead” really mean.
  • group activity: when is it okay to lie.
  • SWC: SWC will ask students to write about someone they know who worked hard and, nevertheless, did not get ahead.
  • discussion: discuss strengths and weaknesses of several examples of SWC
  • discussion: previewing and predicting Henrietta Lacks. Also, a discussion of voice in Henrietta Lacks.
  • group activity: discuss the first 48 pages of Henrietta Lacks.
  • discussion: Paper 1, which asks students to discuss this statement: “It has often been said that, in America, if you work hard, you’ll get ahead.”
  • SWD, written in class, will ask students to write a summary of a six-page selection from Henrietta Lacks. We’ll then talk about these as a group comparing the differences among them.
  • The Accelerated Learning Program
  • The Community College of Baltimore County


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