National History Day Resources At Perkins School for the Blind



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National History Day Resources

At Perkins School for the Blind






Primary and Secondary Resources

The National History Day Contest Rule Book describes primary sources as letters, speeches, diaries, newspaper articles from the time, oral history interviews, autobiographies, documents, photographs, and artifacts.


Secondary sources include books and biographies by authors who were not eyewitnesses, newspaper retrospectives, encyclopedias and other reference books.
Primary and secondary resources at Perkins

Perkins School for the Blind receives many requests for information about Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan Macy, and Louis Braille from National History Day participants. Below is a listing of the materials available at the Perkins Research Library and Archives.





HELEN KELLER



Helen Keller primary sources at Perkins:
Newspaper clippings collected throughout Keller’s life.

These are too fragile to photocopy. Researchers may visit, or contact the Research Library if you’re interested in a particular date or event.


Magazine and newspaper articles written by Helen Keller.

Researchers may visit, or contact the Research Library if you’re interested in a particular article.


Nella Braddy Henney Collection, correspondence with Keller and Sullivan from the late 1920s to the early1960s.

Henney was Sullivan’s biographer and a close friend of Keller and Sullivan for many years. Researchers may visit, or contact the Research Library if you’re interested in a particular date or event.



Helen Keller primary sources available on the internet:
Perkins School for the Blind published hundreds of pages about Helen Keller’s early education in its Annual Reports. They are scanned in searchable pdf format, copyright-free, and available online:
Fifty-Sixth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1887.

“Helen Keller,--A Second Laura Bridgman,” pp. 71-107



http://www.google.com/books?id=uaQWAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA71
Fifty-Seventh Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1888.

“Helen Keller,” pp. 67-138



http://www.google.com/books?id=GHIPAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA4-PA67
Fifty-Seventh Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1888.

Description of Helen Keller’s visit with Edith Thomas, pp. 173-176

http://books.google.com/books?id=GHIPAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA4-PA173&lpg=RA4-PA173
Fifty-Ninth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1890.

“Helen Keller,” pp. 113-115



http://books.google.com/books?id=b_wAAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA113&lpg=RA1-PA113
Sixtieth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1891.

“Helen Keller,” pp. 52-302



http://www.google.com/books?id=b_wAAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA52
Sixty-First Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1892.

“Helen’s ‘Tea’ in Aid of the Kindergarten,” pp. 139-174



http://www.google.com/books?id=EKUWAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA139
Sixty-First Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 1892.

“Helen Keller’s Plea for Tommy Stringer,” pp. 198-213



http://www.google.com/books?id=EKUWAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA198
The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller. 1902.

This text is not copyrighted and is available online:



http://www.fullbooks.com/Story-of-My-Life.html

The book is divided into three parts:

1. Keller’s account of her early life and education, including her learning of language.

2. 100 pages of letters written by Keller in the first 20 years of her life, including her very earliest ones.

3. An account of Helen Keller’s personality, education, speech, and literary style, by John Albert Macy, Keller’s close friend and husband of Anne Sullivan Macy.
The World I Live In, by Helen Keller. 1910.

This text is not copyrighted and is available online:



http://www.archive.org/details/worldilivein00kelluoft

In this sequel to her autobiography, Keller describes how she experiences the world.


Optimism: An Essay, by Helen Keller. 1903.

This text is not copyrighted and is available online:



http://www.archive.org/details/optimismessay00kelliala

Keller describes her outlook on life.


Song of the Stone Wall, by Helen Keller. 1910.

This text is not copyrighted and is available online:



http://www.archive.org/details/songofstonewall00kellrich

A poem praising the builders of New England, their history, and ideals.


Helen Keller, by American Foundation for the Blind, 2009.

Although the text in this online Keller museum is a secondary source, there are many downloadable images and photographs that are primary sources.



http://www.afb.org/Section.asp?SectionID=1

Helen Keller primary material in published books (check your library):
Helen Keller, Public Speaker: Sightless But Seen, Deaf But Heard, by Lois J. Einhorn. Greenwood Press, 1998.

Contains the text of many speeches delivered by Helen Keller throughout her life.


Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years, by Philip S. Foner. International Publishers, 1967.

Keller’s articles, letters, and speeches, articulating her socialist political beliefs.


Helen Keller: Selected Writings, ed. by Kim E. Nielsen. New York University Press, 2005.

Excerpts from Keller’s personal and published writings throughout her life.



Helen Keller secondary sources in published books (check your library):
Helen Keller: A Life, by Dorothy Herrmann. University of Chicago, 1998.

A well researched and thoughtful biography.


Helen and Teacher: The Story of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy, by Joseph Lash. Various publishers, 1980.

A meticulously detailed biography.


The Radical Lives of Helen Keller, by Kim Nielsen. New York University, 2004.

An examination of Keller’s political views and work for social justice.

ANNE SULLIVAN MACY

Anne Sullivan Macy primary sources at Perkins:
Nella Braddy Henney Collection, correspondence with Keller and Sullivan, late 1920s - early1960s.

Henney was Sullivan’s biographer and a close friend of Keller and Sullivan for many years. Researchers may visit, or contact the Research Library if you’re interested in a particular date or event.



Anne Sullivan Macy primary sources available on the internet:
The Story of My Life is Helen Keller’s autobiography, written when she was about 22 years old. In the appendix is a collection of letters that Annie Sullivan wrote to her friend Sophia Hopkins, describing her experiences and thoughts when she first began teaching Helen. The originals were destroyed in the 1920s, so these reprints are the only copies there are. This text is not copyrighted and is available online. The letters are in Part 5:

http://www.fullbooks.com/Story-of-My-Life.html Part 5 has the letters.
The text of Anne’s valedictory address at her Perkins graduation in 1886: http://www.perkinsmuseum.org/museum/subsection.php?id=116
Anne Sullivan Macy: The Miracle Worker, by American Foundation for the Blind, 2008.

Although the text in this online museum is a secondary source, there are many downloadable images and photographs that are primary sources.



http://www.afb.org/annesullivan/

Anne Sullivan Macy secondary sources--Books (check your library):
Beyond the Miracle Worker: The Remarkable Life of Anne Sullivan Macy and Her Extraordinary Fr4iendship with Helen Keller by Kim E. Nielsen. Beacon Press, 2009.

A deeply researched and gracefully written biography of Anne Sullivan Macy.


Anne Sullivan Macy: The Story Behind Helen Keller, by Nella Braddy. Doubleday, 1933.

The author was a close friend, and spent hundreds of hours learning Anne’s life story.


Teacher: Anne Sullivan Macy by Helen Keller. Doubleday, 1955.

“A tribute by the foster child of her mind.”


Helen Keller: A Life, by Dorothy Herrmann. University of Chicago, 1998.

Includes a great deal of biographical information about Anne Sullivan Macy.


Helen and Teacher: The Story of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy, by Joseph Lash. Various publishers, 1980.

A dual biography of Keller and Sullivan.


LOUIS BRAILLE

Unfortunately, Perkins School for the Blind has no primary sources about Louis Braille.


Louis Braille primary source on the internet:
The Louis Braille Museum, by American Foundation for the Blind, 2009.

Although the text of this site about Braille is a secondary source, there are many downloadable images and photographs that are primary sources.



http://www.afb.org/LouisBrailleMuseum/braillegallery.asp?GalleryID=44
Louis Braille secondary sources:
Louis Braille: A Touch of Genius, by Michael Mellor. National Braille Press, 2006.

An exhaustively researched biography of Braille, including many beautiful photographs and the text of Louis Braille’s recently discovered correspondence.



F:\National History Day\NHD 2010 – November 11, 2009

Perkins School for the Blind 617-924-3434 phone

175 North Beacon Street 617-926-2027 fax

Watertown, MA 02472 www.Perkins.org

Founded in 1829




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