English b section 6160 Spring Semester 2010 Monday H315 9: 15-11: 20 Wednesday H311 9: 15-11: 20



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English B Section 6160

Spring Semester 2010

Monday H315 9:15-11:20

Wednesday H311 9:15-11:20

English B Section 6178

Spring Semester 2010

Monday H315 11:30-1:35

Wednesday H311 11:30-1:35

Please note that I am deeply committed to your success.

Professor: Bruce Peppard

Office: H 321-J

Office Hours: M/W 8:00-9:00 & T/Th 9:10-10:10 & by appointment.

Phone/Voice mail: (310) 660-3593 Ext. 6772

Email: bpeppard@elcamino.edu Be sure to put your name & “English B” in subject heading
Writing Center: Located in the Humanities Building, Room 122, the writing center offers students free pre-writing conferences, full draft writing conferences, grammar conferences, reading conferences, and more. You will need either an assignment sheet, a writing center form completed by me, or a specific assignment from a textbook. You will need a student ID for services. For more information contact the center at (310) 660-3593 Ext. 3873.

Required Materials


  • A notebook for journal writing activities. This will be different than your notebook for taking notes in class.

  • Real Writing with Readings by Susan Anker. This is available in the bookstore. There is also a reserve copy of the book available for use in the library at the Periodicals/Reserve desk.


Course Description: The following description is taken from the course outline provided by El Camino College: “This course focuses on the brief expressive composition. Students write primarily narration and description based on observations of people, places, and things. In addition, they write reactions to brief reading selections. Some features of English B are focused journal writing, a learning tool that can be used in other courses; individualized instruction in sentence and word skills; assignments in critical thinking skills; and exercises in the elements of a composition” (108).
Course Objectives:

A. Read and apply critical thinking skills to pre-collegiate texts for the purposes of writing and discussion.


B. Apply appropriate strategies from the writing process to create, compose, revise, and edit drafts.
C. Demonstrate ability to participate in draft-review activities, such as peer review and one-on-one tutorials.
D. Plan, write, and revise paragraphs based on personal experience and observations, including a topic sentence and supporting details, and avoiding grammatical and mechanical errors that interfere with meaning.
E. Write and revise summaries of, and personal responses to, short magazine or newspaper articles.
F. Compose a variety of sentence types and edit them for correct grammar, appropriate word choice, and accurate spelling.

Student Learning Outcome: Write a brief descriptive, reflective, or narrative paragraph(s) that has gone through multiple revisions and responds to a text previously discussed in class. The paragraph(s) should provide readers with a thesis that makes a clear point and provides supporting details. It should be logically organized and focused. Grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure should not impede comprehension.

Students with Disabilities: If you have a documented disability and wish to discuss academic accommodations, please let me know. You may speak to me after class, during my office hours, or by phone or email. Your privacy will be protected. You are also encouraged to contact the Special Resource Center on campus (310-660-3593 X3295) to discuss what accommodations and services are available.

Course Requirements


Attendance: Come to class regularly and on time. I need you in the classroom participating. This requirement is not only for your benefit, but for your peers as well. If you miss more than four classes, your grade will be lowered one full grade. If you miss more than five classes, you will not receive credit for the course. Two tardies equal an absence; two early departures equal an absence. Keep track of your own attendance (TAPE). If you are absent three days in a row, I will assume you have dropped the class.
Conferences: This class is designed for one on one conferences. Once a week you will meet with a tutor or me to go over your writing strengths and weaknesses. Listen carefully to our advice and work to improve your weaknesses in your next writing assignment.
Class Participation: The best way to learn something is to participate in an activity. I expect you to participate appropriately and not disturb those around you.


  • Cell Phones: Turn them off and put them away. It is rude to answer phones or text message during class time (this includes stepping outside to answer your phone). This class is worth tuning in to, so please do so.


Computer Lab: This semester we are fortunate to meet once each week in the computer lab. No food or drink is allowed in the lab. In addition, you should never be looking at inappropriate web sites or playing games on the computers. Save your work often and be sure to bring a flash drive to each class. Only work on class related activities in the lab. If you finish the daily work, please get started on your homework. If you still have time, I recommend you study areas of weakness either in your text or at http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/.
Homework: Doing the homework will help you write better. Choose to do it on time, as late homework will not be accepted. If you write in your textbook, be sure you either photocopy the assigned pages or are willing to tear the pages out so I can collect them. Expect two hours of homework for every hour we spend in class.
Plagiarism: Be sure the work you hand in is yours. I want to improve upon your writing, not someone else’s. Plagiarism is defined in Between Worlds as “using someone else’s ideas or language as your own, accidentally or deliberately” (454). Plagiarism is considered cheating in college and you will fail the assignment if you plagiarize.
Late Assignments: Assignments will be lowered one grade for each class period they are late.
Grading: You will receive grades in the following categories:

Multi-draft writings 60%

Homework 10%

In-class writings, outside writings, journals 10%

Quizzes 10%

Attendance and class participation 10%


Although this is a credit/no credit course, I will grade each student in the traditional method of A, B, C, D, and F. D and F indicate no credit for the course. 90-100 points = A, 80-89 points = B, 70-79 points = C, 60-69 points = D, <60 points = F.

Your writing will be graded based on the holistic grading rubric found on the next page.



English B
Holistic Grading Rubric



Assignments and Class Schedule:

The following schedule is tentative and likely to change. Journals, quizzes, and other material will be added as the semester progresses.



Week 1

Wed. 2/17: Tardy Absent Present Early departure

Classroom Activities:

  • What’s in a name? (First day ppt. 1-6)

  • Introduction of course, self, syllabus, and text. Room Change?

  • What’s in a journal? Personal thoughts, reflections.

  • Getting on course. Habits of successful students. (ppt. 7-21)

  • Diagnostic: Sample writing (collect name exercise).

Homework: Purchase book or visit the one on Reserve at the library. Read pages 9-24 Chapter 1.
Week 2
Mon. 2/22 Tardy Absent Present Early departure

Classroom Activities

  • Homework Review

  • The Late Paper

  • Classroom contract

  • Introduction to writing as a process.

  • In-class prewriting exercises

  • What employers want from employees (overhead)

  • Chapter 3 overview: Gathering Ideas for Writing

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Letter to Younger Self”

Homework: Read Chapters 2 and 3. Complete “Chapter Review” for each chapter.
Wed 2/24: Tardy Absent Present Early departure

Classroom Activities:

  • Homework Review

  • Self assessment online (ppt 23)

  • Choosing greater personal responsibility

  • Creator and Victim language (ppt 24-32) Handout. 4 ways to dispute inner critic

  • Recognizing the Elements of Good Writing

  • Introduction to body paragraph format

  • Writing the topic sentence (Chapter 4)

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Eulogy for Myself”

Homework:

  • Chapter 4: Practice 5 (p. 49), Practice 6 (p. 50), Practice 8 (p. 52), Writing Assignment (p.54—Use Journal Idea from page 42) and Chapter Review (p. 55).

  • Journal Writing Assignment: “Greatest Past Success & Greatest Future Success”


Week 3

Mon 3/1: Tardy Absent Present Early departure

Classroom Activities:

  • Homework Review

  • Overhead review of topic sentences (Writing Assignment Ch. 4, p. 54)

  • Supporting your point (Chapter 5)

  • Making a Plan (Chapter 6)

  • Chapter 9: Developing Paragraphs: Narration

  • Chapter 20: Finding Subjects and Verbs in Simple Sentences (pp. 277-284)

  • Write a letter to yourself about how college will assist you in achieving your greatest goals and dreams

Homework:

  • Chapter 5: Chapter Review.

  • Chapter 9: Practice 4.

  • Type a narration paragraph from page 117 Assignment 1. Choose either a time you succeeded, a conflict at work, a mistake you made that helped you learn a lesson, or an embarrassing experience (my favorite).


Wed 3/3: Tardy Absent Present Early departure

Due: First draft of narration paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Homework Review

  • 20-minute QUIZ: Finding Subjects and Verbs

  • Overhead review of narration paragraphs

  • Expectations for tutoring days

  • Self-motivation and affirmation statement (ppt 33-41)

  • Chapters 21 and 22: Fragments and run-ons, your nemesis and mine.

Homework:

  • Chapter 21: Practice 3, Practice 8, Chapter Test.

  • Chapter 22: Practice 6

  • Read “It’s Time I Shed My Ex-convict Status” (pp. 597-599)

  • Read “Chili Cheese Dogs. . .” (pp.601-603)

  • Type final draft of narration paragraph


Week 4

Mon 3/8: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: Your final draft of typed narration paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • 20-minute QUIZ: Fragments and Run-ons

  • Chapter 23: Problems with Subject Verb Agreement

  • Introduction to Definition Paragraph: Read Chapter 14 thoroughly

  • Create topic sentence for Definition Paragraph from Assignment #1 (p. 185). Use any of the paragraph suggestions, except “academic probation,” “internship,” and “course syllabus.”

  • Begin your Definition Paragraph

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Superhero Ability”

Homework:

  • Read “Passage into Manhood” and “Spanglish” (pp. 644-650)

  • Finish and type the Definition paragraph you began in class today.



Wed 3/10: T A P E

Due: Definition paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Discuss readings

  • Overhead review of Definition paragraph

  • Silent Socratic Dialogue on definition paragraph

  • Self-Management (ppt 42) Graduation Game

  • Semester’s assignments checklist

  • 32 day commitment (handout)

  • 20-minute QUIZ: Subject and Verb Agreement

  • 20-minute QUIZ: Topic Sentences and Controlling Ideas

  • Journal Writing Activity: “If I Could Change One Thing About”

Homework: Rewrite, revise and retype your Definition paragraph
Week 5

Mon 3/15: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: Final draft of Definition paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • 20-Minute QUIZ Fragments, Run-ons, Comma-splices

  • Introduction to Description Paragraph: Read Chapter 11. Do Practice 1 and Practice 4.

  • Begin Descriptive Paragraph: Choose paragraph topic from Assignment #1 (p. 145). Use the checklist on p. 147 as a guide.

Homework:

  • Read “Discovery” and “Creation Stories” (pp. 614-623).

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Community Service”

  • Complete your first draft of Description Paragraph.


Wed 3/17: T A P E

Due: First draft of Description Paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Discuss readings

  • Emotional Intelligence (ppt 48) and accompanying handouts

  • Review homework (Chapter 11)

  • How to be a critical reader.

  • Overhead and peer review of descriptive paragraphs

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Bedroom Description”

Homework: Rewrite, Revise, and Retype Descriptive paragraph
Week 6

Mon 3/22: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: Final Draft of Description Paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Introduction to Argument paragraphs and essays: Read Chapter 17.

  • Begin writing Argument paragraph: Assignment #1 (232-233). Choose any of these subjects except “persuade teacher” or “textbooks.”

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Million Dollars to Unknowns”

Homework:

  • Read “Why Profiling Won’t Work” and “Everything isn’t Racial Profiling” (670-676).

  • Write and type Argument paragraph begun in class today


Wed 3/25: T A P E

Due: First draft Argument paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Discuss Readings

  • Managing Overwhelm, anger/resentment, fear/anxiety, and sadness/depression

  • Overhead and peer review of Argument paragraph

  • The art of revision: Chapter 8

Homework:

  • Rewrite, revise, and retype Argument paragraph. Use checklist on pp 234-235 as a guide

  • Chapter 8: Practice 3 and Chapter Review



Week 7

Mon 3/29: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: Second draft of Argument paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Using verb tenses properly: Chapter 24. Complete Practice 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13 & 14.

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Local Problem to Resolve”

Homework: Chapter 24: Chapter Review and Chapter Test
Wed 3/31: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • Homework Review.

  • A few arguments for analysis (let’s debate)

  • Emphasis on transition words. Transition exercises.

  • Introduction to quotation marks (Chapter 38)

Homework:

  • Transition exercise handout.

  • Chapter 38: Practice 3 and Chapter Test.

  • Journal Writing Assignment: “Profiling.”

  • Rewrite, revise, and retype argument paragraph.


Week 8

Mon 4/5: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: Final draft of argument paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Conferences. Review

Homework:

  • Study for midterm exam in-class

  • Read Chapter 36: Commas (all exercises)


Wed 3/7: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • Conferences continued. Review

Homework:

  • Study for midterm exam in-class

  • Read Chapter 36: Commas (all exercises)




4/10-4/16 No School—Spring Break


Week 9

Mon 4/19: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • First half of class: MIDTERM EXAM (No Tutor)

  • Second half of class: Chapter 40: Using Correct Capitalization

Homework: Chapter 40: Practice 2, 3, and Chapter Test
Wed 4/21: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • 20-minute QUIZ: Capitalization

  • Review Midterm.

  • Comma Review (Chapter 36)

  • Introduction to Compare/Contrast paragraph: Chapter 15

  • Write compare/contrast paragraph in class: Assignment #1 (p. 201)

Homework: Complete and type compare/contrast paragraph
Week 10

Mon 4/26: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: First Draft Compare/Contrast Paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Quiz on Commas

  • Journal Assignment: Are you a successful or struggling student? What behaviors and thoughts make you a successful or struggling student? How could you become a better student? Offer ample evidence to support your claims. Adhere to paragraph structure.

  • Chapter 39: Other Punctuation. Complete Practice 1, Chapter Review, and Chapter Test.

  • If time permits, work on revising your compare/contrast paragraphs.

Homework: Read “My Indian” and “Gender Patterns” (pp. 653-660)
Wed 4/28: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • Developing Paragraphs: Comparison/Contrast

  • Homework Review

  • Compare/contrast paragraph analysis

  • Introduction to the apostrophe (Chapter 37)

Homework:

  • Chapter 37: Practice 1, 2, and Chapter Test.

  • Rewrite, revise, and retype compare/contrast paragraph


Week 11

Mon 5/3: T A P E

Tutor Day

Due: Final Draft Compare/Contrast Paragraph

Classroom Activities:

  • Commonly Confused Words (Chapter 34). Complete all of chapter.

  • Journal Entry: “Two Kinds of People”

Homework: Address “Summarize and Respond” (p. 680) for “Junk Food in Schools” (pp.678-684)
Wed 5/5: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • Developing paragraphs further: More attention to detail.

  • Overhead review of final draft compare/contrast paragraphs

  • Introduction to the essay. Moving from paragraph to essay.

  • Discussion of thesis statement, parts of the essay, transitions

  • Chapter 19: Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting (MLA)

Homework:

  • Write introductory paragraph to persuasive essay


Week 12

Mon 5/10: T A P E

Due: Introductory Paragraph to Persuasive Essay

Classroom Activities:

  • Overhead and peer review of introductory paragraphs to persuasive essay

  • Chapter 19 (MLA) continued

  • All day essay work

Homework: Write and type first draft of essay (five paragraphs).
Wed 5/12: T A P E

Due: Revised Introductory Paragraphs for Persuasive Essay

Classroom Activities:

  • Evaluating the model persuasive essay

  • Faulty parallelism (Chapter 30). Complete Practice 1, 2, and 4.

  • Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers (Chapter 27)


Week 13

Mon 5/17: Tutor Day T A P E

Due: First Draft of Persuasive Essay

Classroom Activities:

  • 20 minute QUIZ on faulty parallelism

  • 20 minute QUIZ on modifiers

  • Sentence Variety (Chapter 31). Complete Practice 1, 2, 5, and 8. Please read through the entire chapter thoroughly.

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Musician/Athlete”

Homework: Work on your essays which will be turned in on 6/1.
Wed 5/19: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • 20 Minute QUIZ on Sentence Variety

  • Homework review

  • Peer-review and instructor review

  • Improving topic sentences

Homework: Rewrite and retype your persuasive essay—make it awesome
Week 14

Mon 5/24: T A P E

  • Bring persuasive essays to class in both hard copy and electronic form

  • In-class activities

  • Life plans

  • Essays and outside sources


Wed 5/26: T A P E

  • Due: Final Draft of Persuasive Essay

  • Homework/in-class textbook work review from Monday.

  • Introduction to writing a resume using ample samples.

  • In-class resume writing activity. Model resume. Monster.com.

  • Resume Workshop: How to turn a phrase

Homework: Write and type a resume that accurately reflects your skills and abilities: Due next Wednesday
Week 15

Mon 5/31: T A P E

Holiday—no class. (Memorial Day)
Wed 6/2: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

Due: Typed resume

Classroom Activities:

  • Journal Writing Activity: “Where Do We Go Now”

  • Journal Writing Activity: “This I Believe”

  • Subordination (Chapter 29). Complete all Practices in chapter and Chapter Test.

Homework: Chapter 27: Practice 1, 2, 3, and Chapter Test. Coordination (Chapter 28).
Week 16

Mon 6/7: T A P E

Classroom Activities:

  • Review. Grades.

  • Conferences


Wed 6/9: Fare thee well . . . T A P E

Assignment Sheet: Compare/Contrast Paragraph (point by point or block by block)

Instructor Peppard

English B Section _______ First draft due __________. Final draft due __________.

Length: ¾ to 1 full page, typed, Times New Roman font, size 12, 1” margins


Write and type a detailed, stand alone body paragraph on one of the following topics:

  • Two athletes

  • Two musicians

  • Two television shows

  • Two dance styles

  • Two songs by the same artist

  • Two types of people

  • Two sports teams

  • A topic you choose signed off by me ________

Remember, comparison is writing that shows similarities among subjects; contrast shows differences. Also remember the four basics of good comparison and contrast identified in your textbook:

It uses subjects have enough in common to be compared/contrasted in a useful way (your main point)

It serves a purpose—it either helps readers make a decision or helps them better understand the subject.

It presents several important, parallel points of comparison/contrast. (secondary support)

It arranges points in a logical order. (189)


For this assignment, make your topic sentence (your main point) the first sentence of your paragraph.

Use the following checklist/chart as you build and revise your paragraph.






Focus

  • Think about what you want to compare or contrast and your purpose for doing so.





Narrow and explore your topic. (Chapter 3)

  • Choose specific subjects to compare/contrast, making sure they have enough in common to result in a meaningful paper.

  • Write down some ideas about the subjects.





Write a topic sentence.

  • Include the subjects and your main point about them.

  • Make sure the sentence serves your purpose.





Support your point. (Chapter 5)


  • Prewrite to find similarities or differences. Try making a two column list (see p. 192).

  • Add details that will help your readers see the similarity or difference in each point of comparison or contrast





Make a plan. (Chapter 6)





  • Decide whether to use point-by-point or block-by-block organization.

  • Make an outline with the points of comparison or contrast in the order you want to present them.





Write a draft. (Chapter 7)


  • Write a paragraph with a topic sentence and detailed points of comparison or contrast. Use complete sentences.

  • Write a conclusion that reminds readers of your main point and makes an observation based on what you have written.

  • Write a title that previews your main point but doesn’t repeat it.




Revise your draft, making at least four improvements (Chapter 8)


  • Get feedback from the writing center in Humanities 122.

  • Add any points and details that will show readers the similarities or differences.

  • Reread to make sure all points of comparison or contrast are parallel and relate to your main point.

  • Add transitions to move readers from one point to the next.




Edit your revised draft.

  • Correct errors in grammar, spelling, word use, and punctuation.





Ask yourself:

  • Does my paper have the Four Basics of Good Comparison and Contrast (p.189)?

  • Is this the best I can do? If not, revise and rewrite!

Assignment Sheet: Argument Paragraph Assignment

Instructor Peppard

English B Section _______ First draft due __________. Final draft due __________.

Length: ¾ to 1 full page, typed, Times New Roman font, size 12, 1” margins


Write and type a detailed, stand alone body paragraph on one of the following topics from pages 232 and 233 of your textbook:

  • Take a position on a controversial issue in your workplace, community, or campus

  • Take a position on a controversial issue in the news

  • Argue that something should be banned

  • Argue to lower or raise the drinking age or the voting age

Remember, argument is writing that takes a position on an issue and attempts to convince someone to at least consider that position. Also remember the four basics of good argument identified in your textbook:

It takes a strong and definite position (your main point)

It gives good reasons and supporting evidence to defend the position (primary support)

It considers opposing views (secondary support)

It has enthusiasm and energy from start to finish. (220)


For this assignment, make your topic sentence (your main point) the first sentence of your paragraph.

Use the following checklist/chart as you build and revise your paragraph.






Focus

  • Think about topics/issues that interest you.





Narrow and explore your topic. (Chapter 3)

  • Choose a particular issue that you care about.

  • Write down some ideas about the issue.





Write a topic sentence.

  • Think about how you are personally affected by the issue.

  • Write a topic sentence that includes your position.

  • Rewrite the topic sentence to make it more definite and confident.





Support your point. (Chapter 5)


  • Prewrite to come up with reasons and evidence.

  • Use RENNS (reasons, examples, names, #s,)

  • Consider opposing views and anticipate objections.





Make a plan. (Chapter 6)





  • Arrange reasons in order of importance; most important last.





Write a draft. (Chapter 7)


  • Write a paragraph with a topic sentence, reasons for your position, and supporting evidence. Use complete sentences.

  • Write a conclusion that reminds readers of your position and makes a strong last attempt to convince them.

  • Write a title that previews your main point but doesn’t repeat it.




Revise your draft, making at least four improvements (Chapter 8)


  • Get feedback from the writing center in Humanities 122.

  • Cut reasons that don’t directly support your position or that are weak.

  • Add reasons and evidence that help readers understand your position.

  • Anticipate criticisms opposing views may have.

  • Be sure essay is organized by order of importance.

  • Add transitions to move readers from one point to the next.




Edit your revised draft.

  • Correct errors in grammar, spelling, word use, and punctuation.





Ask yourself:

  • Does my paper have the Four Basics of Good Argument (p.220)?

  • Is this the best I can do? If not, revise and rewrite!


Assignment Sheet: Description Paragraph Assignment

Instructor Peppard

English B Section _______

Length: ¾ to 1 full page, typed, Times New Roman font, size 12, 1” margins


Type a detailed, stand alone body paragraph on one of the following topics (p. 145)

  • A favorite photograph

  • A person you know very well

  • Your bedroom

Remember, description “is writing that creates a clear and vivid impression of the topic. It translates your experience of a person, place, or thing into words, often by appealing to the physical senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch” (134). The four basics of good descriptions are:

It creates a main impression—an overall effect, feeling, or image—about the topic.

It uses specific examples to support the main impression.

It supports those examples with details that appeal to the five senses.

It brings a person, place, or physical object to life for the reader.


For this assignment, make your topic sentence (your main point) the first sentence of your paragraph.

Use the following checklist/chart as you build and revise your descriptive paragraph.






Focus

  • Think about what you want to describe and what picture you want to create for your readers.




Narrow and explore your topic. (Chapter 3)


  • Prewrite, thinking of the senses you could use to describe your topic.




Write a topic sentence that includes your narrowed topic and impression.

  • Review your prewriting. Then, close your eyes and try to experience your topic as you first did.

  • Decide what is most important to you about the experience.




Support your main impression. (Chapter 5)


  • Prewrite for details and images that bring your topic to life

  • Read the details and add more to fill in the picture.




Make a plan. (Chapter 6)


  • Arrange your details in a logical order (time, space, or importance).

  • See page 140 for common transitions.





Write a draft. (Chapter 7)


  • Write a paragraph with your topic sentence, major examples/images, and supporting sensory details. Use complete sentences.

  • Write a conclusion that reminds readers of the topic and main impression and makes an observation based on what you have written.

  • Write a title that previews your main point but doesn’t repeat it.

  • Get feedback from others using the writing center in Humanities 122. You may also wish to view the peer-review guide for description at bedfordstmartins.com/realwriting.




Revise your draft, making at least four improvements (Chapter 8)


  • Read to make sure that all examples and details serve to create your main impression.

  • Add more sensory details to make the description stronger.

  • Add transitions to move your readers from one detail to another.




Edit your revised draft.

  • Correct errors in grammar, spelling, word use, and punctuation.





Ask yourself:

  • Does my paper have the Four Basics of Good Narration (p.134)?

  • Is this the best I can do?


Assignment Sheet: Definition Paragraph Assignment

Instructor Peppard

English B Section _______

Length: ½ page minimum, typed, Times New Roman font, font size 12, 1” margins


Write and type a detailed, stand alone body paragraph on one of the following terms from page 185 of your textbook:

  • Confidence

  • A term used in your work place

  • A slang word

  • Racism

  • Scam

  • One of the services on campus (i.e. financial aid)

  • Common sense

  • Love

Remember, definition is writing that explains what a term or concept means. Also remember the four basics of good Definition identified in your textbook:

It tells readers what is being defined.

It presents a clear basic definition.

It uses examples to show what the writer means.

It gives details about the examples that readers will understand. (177)


For this assignment, make your topic sentence (your main point) the first sentence of your paragraph. With definition paragraphs, your main point is usually the definition of the term or concept. Your purpose is to clarify for the reader how you understand the term or concept.
Use the following checklist/chart as you build and revise your Definition paragraph.




Focus

  • Think about the term you want to define and the meaning you want to give your readers.




Explore your topic. (Chapter 3)


  • Prewrite about the term or concept and its definition as you are using it.

  • Review your prewriting and choose a definition.




Write a topic sentence. (Chapter 4)

  • Write a sentence using one of the patterns on page 180.




Support your definition. (Chapter 5)

  • Prewrite to get examples that will show what you mean by the term or concept.




Make a plan. (Chapter 6)

  • Organize your examples, saving for last the one that you think will have the most impact on readers.





Write a draft. (Chapter 7)


  • Write a paragraph that includes a topic sentence, and defines your term or concept, showing what you mean through examples. Use complete sentences.

  • Write a conclusion that restates the term or concept and makes an observation about based on what you have written.

  • Write a title that previews your main point but doesn’t repeat it.




Revise your draft, making at least four improvements (Chapter 8)


  • Get feedback from others using the writing center in Humanities 122. You may also may wish to view the peer-review guide for definition at bedfordstmartins.com/realwriting.

  • Reread your definition of the term or concept to make sure that it clearly states your meaning.

  • Add any other examples that you can think of, and delete any that do not clearly show the meaning of the term or concept.

  • Add transitions to move your readers from one example to the next.




Edit your revised draft.

  • Correct errors in grammar, spelling, word use, and punctuation.





Ask yourself:

  • Does my paper have the Four Basics of Good Definition (p.177)?

  • Is this the best I can do?



Assignment Sheet: Narration Paragraph Assignment

Instructor Peppard

English B Section _______

Length: ¾ to 1 full page, typed, Times New Roman font, size 12, 1” margins


Write and type a detailed, stand alone body paragraph on one of the following topics from page 117 of your textbook:

  • A time you succeeded

  • A conflict at work

  • A mistake you made that helped you learn a lesson

  • An embarrassing experience

Remember, narration is telling a story about an event or an experience. Also remember the four basics of good narration identified in your textbook:

It reveals something of importance to you (your main point)

It includes all of the major events of the story (primary support)

It brings the story to life with details about the major events (secondary support)

It presents the events in a clear order, usually according to when they happened. (107)


For this assignment, make your topic sentence (your main point) the first sentence of your paragraph.

Use the following checklist/chart as you build and revise your paragraph.






Focus

  • Think about your story and what is important about it.





Narrow and explore your topic. (Chapter 3)


  • Make the topic more specific

  • Prewrite, recalling what happened. As you prewrite, ask: Why is the story important?





Write a topic sentence that includes your main point about the story.

  • Say what is important about the story—how it affected you and others.





Support your point. (Chapter 5)


  • Recall the major events, and choose the essential ones.

  • Describe the events with specific details.





Make a plan. (Chapter 6)





  • Arrange the events in time order.





Write a draft. (Chapter 7)


  • Write a paragraph with your topic sentence, major events, and details about the events. Use complete sentences.

  • Write a conclusion that reminds readers of your main point and makes an observation based on what you have written.

  • Write a title that previews your main point but doesn’t repeat it.

  • Get feedback from others using the writing center in Humanities 122. You may also may wish to view the peer-review guide for narration at bedfordstmartins.com/realwriting.




Revise your draft, making at least four improvements (Chapter 8)


  • Read to make sure that all events and details about them show, explain, or prove your main point.

  • Add events and/or details that help make your point about the story.

  • Add time transitions to move your readers from one event to another.




Edit your revised draft.

  • Correct errors in grammar, spelling, word use, and punctuation.





Ask yourself:

  • Does my paper have the Four Basics of Good Narration (p.107)?

  • Is this the best I can do?


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