University of kent



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UNIVERSITY OF KENT
Module Specification



  1. The title of the module

SO895: Crime, Disorder and Community Safety


  1. The Department which will be responsible for management of the module

SSPSSR


  1. The Start Date of the Module

September 2011


  1. The cohort of students (onward) to which the module will be applicable

Students admitted from September 2011 onwards


  1. The number of students expected to take the module

15


  1. Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with other relevant Departments and Faculties regarding the withdrawal

None


  1. The level of the module (eg Certificate [C], Intermediate [I], Honours [H] or Postgraduate [M])

M


  1. The number of credits which the module represents

20 Credits / ECTS 10


  1. Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern)

Autumn


  1. Prerequisite and co-requisite modules

None, though a general background in either criminology, sociology, politics, international relations, or another discipline related to criminal justice is assumed


  1. The programmes of study to which the module contributes

The main programme the module will contribute to is the MA in Criminology. The module will also serve as an option for the LLM in Criminal Justice, and the MA in Terrorism and Security Studies (run by Politics-International relations). The course may also be of interest to students on the MA in Sociology and other related courses run by the SSPSSR.


  1. The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:


    1. Critique to a level appropriate with postgraduate study the key concepts associated with crime prevention, disorder and community safety. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A7, A8, B12, C14, C15, C17, D21, D23, D24)

    2. Critically evaluate a range of theoretical accounts of criminological theory. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A1, A7, B10, B13, C14, C16, D21, D23)

    3. Analyze and critique contemporary crime control strategies in variety of different social, national, and international contexts. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A6, B10, B12, C14, C15, C16, C17, C18, D21, D23, D24)

    4. Critically evaluate the social and political dimensions of some of the main crime control strategies. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A5, A7, A8, A9, B12, C14, C15, C17, D21, D23, D24)

    5. Illustrate examples of crime control measures in relation to of complex contemporary social theoretical debates. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A1, A2, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, B10, B12, B13, C14, C15, C16, C17, C18, D23, D24)

    6. Locate the changing nature of crime and victimisation, and the key concepts associated with the crime control against the backdrop of social theoretical debates. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A1, A3, A5, A7, A9, B10, B12, B13, C18, D21, D23, D24).




  1. The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will:


  1. Demonstrate skills commensurate with postgraduate study in presentation and debate, both verbal and written, and in utilization of research and empirical data. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A7, B10, B11, B12, B13, C15, C16,C18, D19, D20, D21, D22, D23, D24 )

  2. Be able to synthesis complex theoretical items of knowledge from different schools and disciplines of enquiry. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A1, A7, B10, B13, C14, C16, C17, C18, D20, D21, D23)

  3. Be able to gather library and web-based resources appropriate for postgraduate study; make critical judgments about their merits and use the available evidence to construct a developed argument to be presented orally or in writing. These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (A4, C15, 16, D19, D20, D21, D22, D23, D24, D25)

  4. Have gained an appreciation of inter-disciplinarity These intended learning outcomes relate to the programme learning outcomes for the MA in Criminology (B10, B11, C17, D24)




  1. Synopsis of the curriculum.

This module aims to examine the various policies and strategies that have been adopted to reduce crime and disorder and to limit victimisation. It will examine the role of spatial and organisational policies that have been adopted in the UK and other countries to increase community safety and reduce crime. The module will include the following elements:

  • A discussion of the definition and deployment of the concept of crime

  • An examination of the growth and dissemination of crime prevention measures

  • An assessment of the fear of crime and its impact on community safety

  • An examination of spatial crime control measures

  • Understanding the nature and role of disorder in modern urban settings

  • Examining the ‘crime drop’ over the past two decades

  • Understanding the role and meaning of ‘anti-social behaviour’

  • The regulation of street prostitution: A Case study

  • Evaluating crime prevention measures




  1. Indicative Reading List

Crawford, A. (1998) Crime Prevention and Community Safety: Longman

Matthews, R. and Pitts, J. (2001) Crime Prevention Disorder and Community Safety. Routledge

Hughes et al. (2001) Crime Prevention and Community Safety; Sage.

Gilling, D. (1997) Crime Prevention: Theory, Policy and Politics; UCL Press

Hancock, L. (2001) Community Crime and Disorder; Palgrave

Walklate, S. and Evans, K. (1999) Zero Tolerance or Community Tolerance; Ashgate.

Muncie, J. and McLaughlin, E. (1996) The Problem of Crime; Sage.

Squires, P. (2008) ASBO Nation: The Criminalisation of Nuisance: The Policy Press.



  1. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of the intended learning outcomes.

Teaching is through a combination of lectures and seminars, though the convenor will be available to discuss particular difficulties raised by individual students, particularly in relation to the preparation of module assessments. Seminar presentations are regarded as important in allowing students to develop research and presentation skills and for the seminar leader to gauge student progress and to address difficulties. Equally they provide an important feedback mechanism for students. The also provide the facility for student presentations and teamwork.
The module will be composed of 11 lecture hours and 12 seminar hours. The 23 contact hours together with approximately 176 study hours (weekly preparation and research and writing up of trial paper) will amount to 200 total hours for the module. The intended learning outcomes will be achieved as a result of the interaction of independent study, lecture, seminar and tutorial.
(Lectures and seminars relate to achievement of the intended subject specific learning outcomes 12.1-6 and intended generic learning outcomes 13.1-4).


  1. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended learning outcomes. Students are required to submit an essay of 5,000 words (including footnotes and bibliography) in the module. The Module Convenor will set a list of essay topics for the students to choose from or may give students the opportunity to set their essay topic after consultation and agreement of an alternative essay title. Assessment of essays is undertaken in accordance with departmental Assessment Criteria which relate to learning experiences envisaged as objectives of the module and also place particular emphasis upon the acquisition of relevant critical or evaluative skills.

Learning outcomes will be achieved by assessing the student’s ability to critically evaluate existing research studies and the hypothetical setting up of their own research (in relation to testing intended subject specific learning outcomes 12.1-6 and intended generic learning outcomes 13.1-4).




  1. Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space

Staff: There is sufficient existing staff provision and expertise to teach this course.
The library already has a large number of texts and journals related to subject area. Some additional materials may be required to update existing resources. These purchases will be made from SPSSR’s annual library budget.



  1. A statement confirming that, as far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities

As far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any disadvantage to students with disabilities.
Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching: "I confirm I have been consulted on the above module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of module proposals"

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Director of Learning and Teaching


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Date



Statement by the Head of Department: "I confirm that the Department has approved the introduction of the module and, where the module is proposed by Departmental staff, will be responsible for its resourcing"

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Head of Department


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Date


New module specification approved by Faculty 15 September 2011




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