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M.A. (Economics,) PART-II (Semester System) Semester III &I V, Sessions: 2016-17 and 2017-18 as per RUSA Guidelines


M.A. (ECONOMICS): PART-II

(SEMESTER SYSTEM)

Sessions: 2016-17 and 2017-18
SCHEME OF STUDIES
Note: Complete M.A. (Economics) Course carries 100 credits and each paper carries 5 credits (4 Lectures + 1 Tutorial).
SEMESTER-III

Core Courses

Eco-301: Political Economy of Development 5 (4L+1T)

Eco-302: Evolution and Structure of Indian Economy 5 (4L+1T)

Eco-303: Public Economics



Elective Courses

Eco- 304-305: Any two papers from any one of the following groups:

Group-I

(i) International Economics 5 (4L+1T)

(ii) Regional Economics and Punjab Economy 5 (4L+1T)

(iii) Money and Banking 5 (4L+1T)

(iv) Comparative Economics Systems 5 (4L+1T)

(v)Theory of Statistics 5 (4L+1T)

(vi) Mathematical Economics 5 (4L+1T)

(vii) Computer Applications for Economists -I 5 (4L+1T)



Group-II

(i) Theory of Statistics 5 (4L+1T)

(ii) Econometrics 5 (4L+1T)
SEMESTER-IV

Core Courses

Eco-401: Political Economy of Development 5 (4L+1T)

Eco-402: Evolution and Structure of Indian Economy 5 (4L+1T)

Eco-403: Public Economics 5 (4L+1T)



Elective Courses

ECO- 404-405: Any two papers from any one of the following groups:

(Same as selected in Semester-III)

Group-I

(i) International Economics 5 (4L+1T)

(ii) Regional Economics and Punjab Economy 5 (4L+1T)

(iii) Money and Banking 5 (4L+1T)

(iv) Comparative Economics Systems 5 (4L+1T)

(v)Theory of Statistics 5 (4L+1T)

(vi) Mathematical Economics 5 (4L+1T)

(vii) Computer Applications for Economists -II 5 (4L+1T)



Group-II

(i) Theory of Statistics 5 (4L+1T)

(ii) Econometrics 5 (4L+1T)

SYLLABUS

M.A. (ECONOMICS)

PART-II

(SEMESTER SYSTEM)
Sessions: 2016-17 and 2017-18
SCHEME OF STUDIES
SEMESTER-III

Eco-301: Political Economy of Development

Eco-302: Evolution and Structure of Indian Economy

Eco-303: Public Economics



Eco- 304-305: Any two papers from any one of the following groups:

Group-I

(i) International Economics

(ii) Regional Economics and Punjab Economy

(iii) Money and Banking

(iv) Comparative Economics Systems

(v)Theory of Statistics

(vi) Mathematical Economics

(vii) Computer Applications for Economists -I



Group-II

(i) Theory of Statistics

(ii) Econometrics
SEMESTER-IV

Eco-401: Political Economy of Development

Eco-402: Evolution and Structure of Indian Economy

Eco-403: Public Economics



ECO- 404-405: Any two papers from any one of the following groups:

(Same as selected in Semester-III)

Group-I

(i) International Economics

(ii) Regional Economics and Punjab Economy

(iii) Money and Banking

(iv) Comparative Economics Systems

(v)Theory of Statistics

(vi) Mathematical Economics

(vii) Computer Applications for Economists -II



Group-II

(i) Theory of Statistics

(ii) Econometrics
The Break-up of 20 Marks for Internal Assessment (Theory papers) is as below:

1. Two Mid-Semester Tests 08 Marks

2. Class Attendance 04 Marks

3. Project Work/Assignment 08 Marks

Seminar/ Field Work etc.

Total Marks 20 Marks


Eco-301: Political Economy of Development

Time Allowed: 3 Hours

Pass Marks: 35%

Teaching Hours (For Regular Students): 55

For Regular and Distance Education Students

Maximum Marks: 80

Internal Assessment: 20 Marks

External Assessment: 60 Marks





For Private Students

Maximum Marks: 80



INSTRUCTIONS TO THE PAPER-SETTER

For Regular and Distance Education Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 09 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of three marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 24 marks.

For Private Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of four marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 32 marks.



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions in all selecting two questions from each of the Section A and B and the entire section C.



SECTION-A

Scientific Socialist World Outlook : World outlook, Idealism and materialism, Metaphysics and dialectics, Laws of dialectics, Categories of philosophy, Theory of cognition.

Dialectical and Historical Materialism: Its theory and method, Dialectical materialism (Materialistic conception of human/social history), Nature and role of contractions.

Mode of Production and Social Superstructure: Factors constituting and forces governing mode of production, Social superstructure and its elements, Dialectical interaction of base and superstructure, About economic development, socials transition and system transformation. Development through Social Formations

Historical Social Formations: Rise of private property, classes and the State, Distinguishing features of Primitive Communism/ society, Slavery, Feudalism/serfdom, Capitalism/imperialism and Socialism/communism.

Asiatic Mode of Production: The concept and controversy, Asiatic mode vs. Feudalism, Characteristics of Asiatic mode. Its specific nature.
SECTION-B

Non-Marxian Theories of Development. Critique of the Bourgeois Economics: Basic assumptions, Theoretical gaps, Unscientific theoretical gaps, Unscientific theoretical structure, Inadequate guide to practice.

Strategies for Third World Development: Perspectives of Third World capitalism; Indigenous&/or dependent, Globalization of dependent capitalism.

Mode of Punjab Economy : Its social implications, Genesis of economic development in Punjab, Towards industrialization urbanization and socialization. Transition from Agrarian to Industrial Economy. T.W. Schultz; Transformation of Traditional Agriculture:

The problem, The associative efficiency, Farm size, control and incentives, Role of technological change and investment in human agent, A Critique.

Joseph A. Schumpeter; Nature & process of Capitalist development: Framework of analysis, Prime factors in development, Nature of development, Process of decline/end, A Critique.

W .W. Rostow; Transition to Capitalism through stages of Growth: The traditional society, The pre-conditions for take -off, The take-off, The drive to maturity, The age of high mass consumption, A critique.
RECOMMENDED READINGS

Karl Marx & F. Engels (1977) : Manifesto of the Communist Party,

Progress Publishers, Moscow, 2nd edition, pp. 34-74.

Joseph Stalin (1978) : Dialectical Materialism, National Book Agency, Pvt. Ltd. , Calcutta, pp.5 to 48.

Maurice Cornforth (1971) : Dialectical Materialism, National Book Agency, Pvt. Ltd. , Calcutta, 3rd edition, Vol. 1, Chs. 2-9, Vol. II, Chs. 3-10.

John Eaton (1973) : Political Economy, International Publishers, New York, revised edition, Chs. 2-11.

J.A. Schumpeter: Theory of Economic Development & Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy.

W.W. Rostow (1971) : The Stages of Economic Growth, Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, Chs. 1,2 and 10.

T.W. Schultz (1970) : Transforming Traditional Agriculture, Lyall Book Depot, Ludhiana, Ist Indian edition, Chs. 1-12.

Paul M. Sweezy (1991) : The Theory of Capitalist Development,

K.P.Bagchi & Co., New Delhi, Ist Indian reprint, ,

Chs. 1,2,4,5,6,8,9,14,15 & 17.

V.I. Lenin (1978): Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism,

Progress Publishers, Moscow, 17th ed., Chs. 1 to 10 or Lenin's Collected Works, Vol.22.

Andre Gunder Frank (1975) : On Capitalist Underdevelopment, Oxford University Press, Delhi.

Balbir Singh (2003) : Vikas di Rajnitik Arthikta, Publication Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.

John S. Augustine (ed.) (1983): Punjab Economy of Punjab: Some Fundamental Issues(menogragh), Department of Economics, Punjabi University, Patiala.

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Karl Marx: Capital , Vol, I Progress Publishers, Moscow (undated), Chs. I,V,VII &VIII.

Paul A, Baran (1962): The Political Economy of Growth, People's Publishing House, New Delhi, Indian edition, Chs. 12,5 & 8.

Leo Huberman (1969): Man's Worldly Goods, People's Publishing House, New Delhi, Ist Indian edition (reprint), Parts I and II.

G.M.Meier (ed.) (1964): Leading Issues in Development Economics,

Oxford University Press , New York, pp.,3-47.

Ernest Mandel (1971): Marxist Economy Theory, Rupa & Co., Delhi, 2nd edition.

Maurice Dobb (1978): Studies in the Development of Capitalism.

Routledge& Kegan Paul, London, Chs, 1 to 6.

Harry Madgoff (1982): The Age of Imperialism, Monthly Review

Press, 2nd edition New York and London.

R.S. Johar and J.S. Khana (ed.) (1983): Studies in Punjab Economy.

Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar.

G.K Chadha (1986): The State and Rural Economy Transformation:

A Case of Punjab 1950 -85, Sage Publications, New Delhi.




ECO-302: Evolution and Structure of Indian Economy


Time Allowed: 3 Hours

Pass Marks: 35%

Teaching Hours (For Regular Students): 55

For Regular and Distance Education Students

Maximum Marks: 80

Internal Assessment: 20 Marks

External Assessment: 60 Marks





For Private Students

Maximum Marks: 80



INSTRUCTIONS TO THE PAPER-SETTER

For Regular and Distance Education Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 09 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of three marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 24 marks.

For Private Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of four marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 32 marks.



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions in all selecting two questions from each of the Section A and B and the entire section C.



SECTION-A

Economic Development during 1857-1947: Evolution of land tenure system. Commercialization of agriculture. Trend towards market economy. Demographic development. Rural indebtedness. Role of foreign capital. Economic consequences of British Rule. Need for planned economic development. Basic strategy for development of Indian economy under planning. Changes in the strategy of Indian planning. Role of public and private sectors in India.



SECTION-B

Agrarian reforms : New Agricultural strategy and green revolution. Production structure of Indian agriculture. Terms of trade between agriculture and industry. Development of irrigation. Nature and extent of industrialization in India. Existing production structure of industry. Industrial policy 1948, 1956 and 1991. Growth of large industrial houses. Small scale industries and their problems.


RECOMMENDED READINGS

Jagdish,N. Bhagwati & Sukhemony Chakravarty: Contributions to Indian Economic Analysis: A survey.

Krishna Shardwaj: Production Conditions in Indian Agriculture, Cambridge University Press.

D.R.Gadgil: The Industrial Evolution in India in Recent Times: 1862-1939; Oxford University Press.

P.C.Joshi: Land Reforms in India, Vikas Publishing Co.

David Lehmenn (ed): Agrarian Reforms and Agrarian Reformism.

V.B. Singh (ed): Economic History of India 1952-1957, allied Publishers.

Charen D. Wadhwa: Some problems of India's Economic Policy, Tata Mc Graw Hills Publishing Co.

Ruddar Datt & KP.M Sudharam: Indian Economy, S. Chand & Co.

Romesh Dutt: The Economic History of India, Vols. I &II

Surendra J. Patel: Agricultural Labourers in Modern India and Pakistan.
SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

M.K.Chaudhary: Trends of Socio-Economic Changes In India: 1871-1961.

S.Katovsky: Reforms in India.

Charan Singh: India's Economic Policy: The Gandhian Blue-Print,

Vikes Publishing House.

Daniel Thorner: The Agrarian Prospects in India.

E.M.S. Namboodripad: Economics and Politics of India's Socialist Pattern, Chaittnay Publications.

Premit Chaudhry: Some Aspects of India Development, George Allen & Unwin, Bleckie

K.N. Raj: India, Pakistan and China: Economic Growth and Outlook.

Bhawani Sen: Evolution of Agrarian Relations of India, People's Publishing House.

P. Singh & V.B. Singh (ed.) : Social and Economic Change: Poverty and Social Change, A Study in the Economic Reorganization of Indian Rural Society, Macmillan Press.

Thoeder Begmann: Agrarian Reforms in India, Agricole Publishing Academy.

Sukhamoy Chakravarty: Development Planning: The Indian Experience, 1987,Oxford.

Terence J. Byres (ed.) : The State, Development Planning and Liberalization in India, Oxford, 1999.



Eco-303: Public Economics

Time Allowed: 3 Hours

Pass Marks: 35%

Teaching Hours (For Regular Students): 55

For Regular and Distance Education Students

Maximum Marks: 80

Internal Assessment: 20 Marks

External Assessment: 60 Marks





For Private Students

Maximum Marks: 80



INSTRUCTIONS TO THE PAPER-SETTER

For Regular and Distance Education Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 09 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of three marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 24 marks.

For Private Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of four marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 32 marks.



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions in all selecting two questions from each of the Section A and B and the entire section C.



SECTION-A

Changing perspective about the Role of the Government. Government in a mixed economy; public and private sector, cooperation or competition; Government as an agent for economic planning and development ; Private goods, public goods, and merit goods; Market failure and imperfections; decreasing costs, externalities of public goods.

Public Choice & Rationale of Public Policy: Private and public mechanism for allocating resources; Problems of preference revelation and aggregation of preferences; Voting systems; Arrow impossibility theorem. Allocation of resources-provision of public goods; Market Voluntary exchange models; Achieving Social goals: poverty alleviation; provision of infrastructural facilities, removing distributional inequalities and regional imbalances. Sources of Public Revenue.

SECTION-B

Taxation: Theory of incidence: Alternative concepts of incidence; Taxable capacity, Meaning and determinants, Effects of taxation-trade off between equity and efficiency. Theories of taxation: Benefit and ability to pay approaches. The problem of double taxation.

Public Expenditure: Rationale for the growth of public expenditure, Wagner's law of increasing state activities: Wiesman-Peacock hypothesis; Pure theory or public expenditure. Planning and Programme budgeting and zero base budgeting. Incidence and Effects of Public Expenditure.
BASIC READINGS LIST

Bachanan, J.M. (1968), The Demand and Supply of Public Goods.

Rand Mc Nally, Chicago.

Mueller, D.C (1979), Public Choice, Cambridge University Press,

Cambridge.

Stiglitz, J.E.(1986), Ecnomics of Public Sector, Norton, New York, .

Atkinson, A.B. and J.E. Sigllizx (1980), Lectures on Public Economics,

Tata Mc Graw Hill, New York.

Auerbach, A.J. and M. Feldstern (eds.) Handbook of Public

Economics. Vol. 1, North Holland, Amsterdam.

Buchanan, J.M. (1970), The Public Finances, Richard D. Irwin,

Homewood.

Goode, R. (1986), Government Finance in Developing Countries,

Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi.

Hughton, J.M.(1970) The Public Finance: Selected Readings,

Penguin, harmondsworth,

Jha, R. (1988), Modern Public Economics, Routledge, London

Menutt, P.(1996), The Economics of Public Choice, Edward Elgar,

U.K.

Musgrave, R.A (1959) , The Theory of Public Finance, McGraw



Hill Kogakhusa, Tokyo.

Musgrave, R.A. and P.B. Musgrave (1976), Public Finance in Theory and Practice, McGraw, Hill, Kogakusha, Tokyo.

Shoup, C.S .(1970), Public Finance, Aldine, Chicage.

Shome, P (ed.) (1995), Tax Policy: Handbook, Tax Division, Fiscal

Affairs Department, International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C.
ADDITIONAL READING LISTS

Dorfman, R.(ed.) (1970), Measuring the Benefits of Government

Investment, Brookings Institution, Washingtion.

Duff; L. (1997), Government and Market, Orient Longman. New Delhi.

Firedman, A (1986), Welfare Economics; and Social Choice Theory,

Martins; Nijhoff, Boston.

Glennester, H. and J. Hills (1998), The State of Welfare: The Economic and Social spending, Oxford University Press, London.

Cornes, R. and T. Sandler (1986) The Theory of Externalities, Public

Goods and Club goods, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Dutt. L. (1997), Government and Market, Orient Longman, New Delhi.

Herber, B.P.(1967), Modern Public Finance, Richard D. Irwin. Homewood.

Spulber, N (1968), Redefining the State, Cambridge University Press,

Cambridge.

Gupta J.R. (1983), Burden of Tax in Punjab, Concept Publishing

Company, New Delhi.

Mishan E.J. (1982), Cost-benefit Anaysis: An Informal Introduction.

George Allen and Unwin, London.

Peacock, A. and D.J. Robertson (eds.)(1983), Public-Expenditure:

Appraisal and Control, Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh.

Phyrr. P.(1970), Zero Base Budgeting: A Practical Management

Tour Tool for Evaluating Expenses, John Wiley, New York.

Premachand, A (1966), Control of Public Expenditure in India, Allied Publishers, New Delhi.

Sahni, B.S. (ed.) (1972), Public Expenditure Analysis: Selected Readings, Rotherdam University Press.

Bird. R. and O. Oldman (1967), Readings on Taxation in Developing Countries, The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.

Cutt. J. (1969), Taxation and Economic Development in India,

Frederic A praegar Publishers, New York.

Any two of the following:
ECO- 304-305: (Group-(i) Opt (i) INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Time Allowed: 3 Hours

Pass Marks: 35%

Teaching Hours (For Regular Students): 55

For Regular and Distance Education Students

Maximum Marks: 80

Internal Assessment: 20 Marks

External Assessment: 60 Marks





For Private Students

Maximum Marks: 80



INSTRUCTIONS TO THE PAPER-SETTER

For Regular and Distance Education Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 09 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of three marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 24 marks.

For Private Students, the question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Sections A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Section C will consist of 8 short-answer type questions of four marks each, which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 32 marks.



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions in all selecting two questions from each of the Section A and B and the entire section C.



SECTION-A

Pure Theory of International Trade: Classical, comparative cost advantage, opportunity cost and factor-endowments. Theory of factor price equalization, reciprocal demand, offer curve analysis and determination of international prices.

New Theories of International Trade: market structure, economies of scale, intra-industry trade, product differentiation and technology. Gains from trade and their distribution: terms of trade, concepts and measurement. Secular deterioration thesis of terms of trade. Emmanuel's theory of unequal exchange.
SECTION-B

Commercial policy: free trade vs. protection. Theory of tariffs, effects of tariffs; partial and general equilibrium analysis. Optimum and effective rates of tariffs. Stolper Samuelson theorem. Political economy of non-tariff barriers.

Theory of regional economic integration: forms of integration, static and dynamic effects of customs union. Bilateral and multilateral agreements. UNCTAD, GATT and WTO. Regional economic grouping: EU,SAARC and NAFTA.
RECOMMENDED READINGS

A.E.A (ed.): Readings in Theory of International Trade, George Allen & Unwin, 1970.

Jadish N. Bhagwati (ed.): International Trade, Penguin, London, 1969.

Bo Sodersten & Geoffrey Reed: International Economics, Macmillian, London. 1994f.

C.P. Kindleberger: International Economics, Richard Irwin, 1973, IIIinois.

I.F.Pearce: International Trade Book I and II. Norton, N.Y. 1970.

Sidney J. Wells: International Economics, George Allen & Unwin, London, 1996.

R.S.Ghuman: International Economics (Punjabi) Publication Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala, 1996.

Dominic K. Salvatore: International Economics , John Wiley and Sons.

7th edition, Singapore, 2001.

Paul Krugman and Maurice obstfed: International Economics: Theory and Policy, Addison Wesley Longman, Singapore, Indian Re-print, 2000.


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Post%20Graduate%20Course(s) -> Syllabus M. Sc. (Microbial & Food Technology) Session 2014-15 and 2015-16 Continue Session 2016-17 and 2017-18
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Post%20Graduate%20Course(s) -> Scheme of Studies
Academic%20Session%202016-17 -> Syllabus (2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19 examinations) B. A. (Honours) Social Sciences Part III scheme of Courses Semester V
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Academic%20Session%202016-17 -> Syllabus (2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19 examinations) B. A. (Honours) Social Sciences Part III scheme of Courses Semester V
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