Night Final Exam Night – pgs. 93-96 Directions



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Name: ___ ______ Points: _______/100

Night Final Exam

Night – pgs. 93-96

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the multiple-choice questions that follow. As students read, they are to annotate for literary elements (6 points)
Reader’s Note: The following passage is taken from the beginning of Chapter 9 and describes when Wiesel’s block is transferred by cattle-car to Buchenwald …
Pressed up against the others in an effort to keep out of the cold, head empty and heavy at the same time, brain a whirlpool of decaying memories. Indifference deadened the spirit. Here or elsewhere – what difference did it make? To die today or tomorrow, or later? The night was long and never ending.

When at last a gray glimmer of light appeared on the horizon, it revealed a tangle of human shapes, head sunk upon shoulders, crouched, piled one on top of the other, like a field of dust-covered tombstones in the first light of the dawn. I tried to distinguish those who were still alive from those who had gone. But there was no difference. My gaze was held for a long time by one who lay with his eyes open, staring into the void. His livid face was covered with a layer of frost and snow.

My father was huddled near me, wrapped in his blanket, his shoulders covered with snow. And was he dead, too? I called him. No answer. I would have cried out if I could have done so. He did not move.

My mind was invaded suddenly by this realization – there was no more reason to live, no more reason to struggle.

The train stopped in the middle of a deserted field. The suddenness of the halt woke some of those who were asleep. They straightened themselves up, throwing startled looks around them.

Outside, the SS went by, shouting:

“Throw out all the dead! All corpses outside!”

The living rejoiced. There would be more room. Volunteers set to work. They felt those who were still crouching.

“Here’s one! Take him!”

They undressed him, the survivors avidly sharing out his clothes, then two “gravediggers” took him, one by the head and one by the feet, and threw him out of the wagon like a sack of flour.

From all directions came cries:

“Come on! Here’s one! This man next to me. He doesn’t move.”

I woke from my apathy just at the moment when two men came up to my father. I threw myself on top of his body. He was cold. I slapped him. I rubbed his hands, crying:

“Father! Father! Wake up. They’re trying to throw you out of the carriage….”

His body remained inert.

The two gravediggers seized me by the collar.

“Leave him. You can see perfectly well that he’s dead.”

“No!” I cried. “He isn’t dead! Not yet!”

I set to work to slap him as hard as I could. After a moment my father’s eyelids moved slightly over his glazed eyes. He was breathing weakly.

“You see,” I cried.

The two men moved away.

Twenty bodies were thrown out of our wagon. Then the train resumed its journey, leaving behind it a few hundred naked dead, deprived of burial, in the deep snow of a field in Poland.

We were given no food. We lived on snow; it took the place of bread. The days were like nights, and the nights left the dregs of their darkness in our souls. The train was traveling slowly, often stopping for several hours and then setting off again. It never ceased snowing. All through these days and nights we stayed crouching, one on top of the other, never speaking a word. We were no more than frozen bodies. Our eyes closed, we waited merely for the next stop, so that we could unload our dead.

Ten days, ten nights of traveling. Sometimes we would pass through German townships. Very early in the morning, usually. The workmen were going to work. They stopped and stared after us, but otherwise showed no surprise.

One day when we had stopped, a workman took a piece of bread out of his bag and threw it into a wagon. There was a stampede. Dozens of starving men fought each other to the death for a few crumbs. The German workmen took a lively interest in this spectacle.

Some years later, I watched the same kind of scene at Aden. The passengers on our boat were amusing themselves by throwing coins to the “natives,” who were diving in to get them. An attractive aristocratic Parisienne was deriving special pleasure from the game. I suddenly noticed that two children were engaged in a death struggle, trying to strangle each other. I turned to the lady.

“Please,” I begged, “don’t throw any more money in!”

“Why not?” she said. “I like to give charity….”

In the wagon where the bread had fallen, a real battle had broken out. Men threw themselves on top of each other, stamping on each other, tearing at each other, biting each other. Wild beasts of prey, with animal hatred in their eyes; an extraordinary vitality had seized them, sharpening their teeth and nails.

A crowd of workmen and curious spectators had collected along the train. They had probably never seen a train with such a cargo. Soon, nearly everywhere, pieces of bread were being dropped into the wagons. The audience stared at these skeletons of men, fighting one another to the death for a mouthful.

A piece fell into our wagon. I decided that I would not move. Anyway, I knew that I would never have the strength to fight with a dozen savage men! Not far away I noticed an old man dragging himself on all fours. He was trying to disengage himself from the struggle. He held one hand to his heart. I thought at first he had received a blow in the chest. Then I understood; he had a bit of bread under his shirt. With remarkable speed he drew it out and put it to his mouth. His eyes gleamed; a smile, like a grimace, lit up his dead face. And was immediately extinguished. A shadow had just loomed up near him. The shadow threw itself upon him. Felled to the ground, stunned with blows, the old man cried:

“Meir. Meir, my boy! Don’t you recognize me? I’m your father… you’re hurting me… you’re killing your father! I’ve got some bread… for you too… for you too….”

He collapsed. His fist was still clenched around a small piece. He tried to carry it to his mouth. But the other one threw himself upon him and snatched it. The old man again whispered something, let out a rattle, and died amid the general indifference. His son searched him, took the bread, and began to devour it. He was not able to get very far. Two men had seen and hurled themselves upon him. Others joined in. When they withdrew, next to me were two corpses, side by side, the father and the son.

I was fifteen years old.






Literary Element Identification (10 points)

Use the literary element bank below in order to identify the correct literary element (s) (1 point each) for each underlined passage and explain your reasoning (1 point each) in the space provided.




The Literary Elements


- Irony - Symbolism - Theme - Imagery




EXEMPLAR –


“And so he left, as he had come! A shadow swept away by the wind.”


The literary element(s) is (are) metaphor
Explain your selection further: Wiesel draws a comparison between two things without using like or as. In this metaphor, Wiesel compares the Rabbi and a shadow in order to express the man’s insignificance to Wiesel.


  1. The night was long and never ending.”

The literary element(s) is (are) ____________________________________________________________


Explain your selection further: ____________________________________________________________
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  1. “They undressed him, the survivors avidly sharing out his clothes, then two “gravediggers” took him, one by the head and one by the feet, and threw him out of the wagon like a sack of flour.

The literary element(s) is (are) ____________________________________________________________


Explain your selection further: ____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________



  1. “Twenty bodies were thrown out of our wagon. Then the train resumed its journey, leaving behind it a few hundred, naked dead, deprived of burial, in the eep snow of a filed in Poland.

The literary element(s) is (are) ____________________________________________________________


Explain your selection further: ____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________


  1. “Men threw themselves on top of each other, stamping on each other, tearing at each other, biting each other. Wild beasts of prey, with animal hatred in their eyes; an extraordinary vitality had seized them, sharpening their teeth and nails.”

The literary element(s) is (are) ____________________________________________________________


Explain your selection further: ____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________


  1. “The old man whispered something, let out a rattle, and died amid the general indifference. His son searched him, took the bread, and began to devour it. He was not able to get very far. Two men had seen and hurled themselves upon him. Others joined in. When they withdrew, next to me were two corpses, side by side, the father and the son.

The literary element(s) is (are) ____________________________________________________________


Explain your selection further: ____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Regent-style multiple choice questions

Directions order to receive full credit, make sure you do each step below in answering the multiple choice question (56 points)


  • Annotate the text – Specific lines are underlined to prove the correct answer (with question # next to them)

  • Circle key words in the question and Underline the question (Such as why, how, or to whom/what the question refers)

  • Take a guess (make a prediction) – Before looking at your multiple choice options, predict your answer alongside the question

  • Eliminate incorrect options – Lose the answers that do not make sense based on your guess

EXEMPLAR –


“Their” (line 39) refers to



  1. the prisoners

  2. the people killed

  3. the neighbors left behind

  4. the guards

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 






  1. The fragments in lines 4-6 emphasize the




    1. the author’s use of personification

    2. the narrator’s state of mind

    3. the description of the setting

    4. the shift in tone

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. The purpose of the description found in lines 7-11 is to




    1. reveal symbolism

    2. describe the setting

    3. introduce Wiesel’s feelings

    4. explain how the Jews died

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. In line 11, the word “livid” emphasizes the contrast between




    1. caring and indifference

    2. pain and death

    3. light and dark

    4. happiness and anger

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. “Void” (line 11) refers to




    1. nature

    2. the deceased

    3. death

    4. Wiesel

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. The term “avidly” (line 24) emphasizes the survivors




    1. egotism

    2. self-preservation

    3. spirituality

    4. mourning

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. The narrator uses simile “like a sack of flour” in order to emphasize the prisoners’




    1. lack of empathy for the dead

    2. extreme sense of hunger

    3. anger at the death of others

    4. denial of the finality of death

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. The term “dead face” (line 73) indicates




    1. metaphor

    2. foreshadowing

    3. irony

    4. imagery

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 



  1. The purpose of the description found on lines 72 to 81 is to




    1. provide a parallel characterization

    2. show that Wiesel has more humanity

    3. introduce the other prisoners’ stories

    4. contrast from the earlier setting

Annotated Text (1)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (1)

Take A Guess

(1)


Eliminated Responses (1)

 

 

 

 





MC Total: _____/64


Annotated Text (8)

Circled/Underlined Key Words (8)

Take A Guess

(8)


Eliminated Responses (8)

Correct

Answer (32)

 

 

 

 

 



FIRST SCAFFOLD CRITICAL LENS: Write the FIRST TWO paragraphs of a critical lens essay using Night as your example. (20 points)
Paragraph 1: Introduction: (10 points)

  • Give the quote

  • Interpret the quote and say whether you agree or disagree

  • Write a thesis statement (it is ok to mention only Night, though in the real Regents you’d need two books)

Paragraph 2: Paragraph about Night: (10 points)



  • Discuss how Night supports your interpretation of the quote

  • Discuss literary elements (e.g. theme, P.o.V., characterization, tone, mood, setting, etc.)

  • Give at least one quote from Night to support your interpretation (in the real Regents you would not give quotes).

“Men are cruel, but Man is kind.”

~Rabindranath Tagore

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