Being an Historian – Making an Argument about Revolution This assessment is based on the types of skills that are necessary for being an historian



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Being an Historian – Making an Argument about Revolution
This assessment is based on the types of skills that are necessary for being an historian. You will respond read a secondary source, source primary source documents and write an argumentative essay
Historical Context:
During the late 18th century (1700s) and early 19th century (1800s) a series of violent conflicts sought to redefine the role of government and society. These political revolutions, starting with the American Revolution and spreading to France, saw people attempt to remake the world according to the ideas of the enlightenment philosophes. In 1791, the revolutionary spirit spread to France’s colony Saint Domingue where slaves led Revolution. For many Historians this revolution was different from its two predecessors, while others argue that it was a continuation of the revolution in France.
Task and Percentage of Grade:

With a 35 minute in-class reading and a 55 minute in-class writing exercise you will complete the following parts of this assessment:
Part 1: Identify the central idea(s) and select strong textual evidence from the chapter that you previously read from To Make Our World Anew: A History of Africans in America by Robin D.G. Kelley and Earl Lewis titled, “Haiti and the Image of Freedom.” (20% of grade). Suggested time: 15 minutes.
Part 2: Break down the documents provided as an historian would: read, text code, annotate, and source (identify perspective, motive, and bias based on source information). (30% of grade) Suggested time: 30 minutes.
Part 3: Write an argumentative essay in which you answer the question below about the Haitian Revolution. (50% of grade). Suggested Time: 5 minutes to Outline, 40 Minutes to Write
Question: Should the Haitian Revolution be viewed as an extension of the French Revolution or as a separate event?


Common Core State Standards & Additional Requirements

Suggested Essay Outline


RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.


RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.


WHST.9-10.1
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of the topic and texts that:
a. Introduce precise claim(s) and establish clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and tone
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
Additional Requirements:




  • When introducing evidence, you MUST discuss perspective (including date and origin), motive, and/or bias

*You are encouraged to develop your own outline and by the end of the year will be required to do so, but this suggested outline will help you to touch on all required aspects of Part 3/ CCSS W.9-10.1:




  • Introduction with thesis that answers the topic question




  • Supporting claim #1




  • Supporting claim #2




  • Counter-argument that argues against the other side of the question/ topic.




  • Active conclusion that weighs evidence from both sides and states WHY


* Note: Each body paragraph should be written using either the History Burger or THIEDIED framework.

Part 1: Secondary Source Research

(20% of Grade)



Suggested Time: 30 to 40 minutes (For homework)
Directions: Read, text code, and annotate the secondary source, a chapter from To Make Our World Anew: A History of Africans in America by Robin D.G. Kelley and Earl Lewis titled, “Haiti and the Image of Freedom.”
As you read the text, TEXT CODE by marking the text with an! for parts that surprise you, a ? for parts or vocabulary you have a question on or are confused by (write the actual question in the space provided), and underline parts you think are important, help to summarize the text, or answer the overall question.
Then, ANNOTATE the text by taking notes in the margin to the right. These notes will help you to answer the big question and later when you write you’re argumentative essay. Frame your notes as follows:


  • For each paragraph write the main idea or analysis of the main idea in the margin (For analysis make connections to other ideas from the course and/ or include your interpretation that moves beyond the text

  • Find specific facts and information that helps to answer the big question.

  • Define key terms/ new vocabulary

  • Follow (or create on your own) a framework for breaking down the reading (positive/ negative, different sides of an argument, claim/ counter-claim, doubt/ believe)


How You Will be Graded:




Mastery (4)

Proficiency (3)

Developing (2)

Needing Support (1)

Text-Coding

Has text coded the entire document. Includes identification of terms or ideas s/he is unclear about. Has identified important information in the text.

Has text-coded the majority of the document. Includes some identification of terms or ideas s/he is unclear about. Has identified most important information but may be missing some information.

Has text coded unevenly. Has identified some important information in the text.

Has limited text coding. Underlines all the text. Does not identify important ideas or phrases.

Annotations of Main Idea and Analysis


Has written a main idea for ALL important sections IYOW. Has developed original analysis in the annotations

Has written a main idea for the idea IYOW for ALL important sections of the text.

Has written the main idea for all sections of the text verbatim (as it was written in the text) OR Has written the main idea for most sections of the text IYOW

Does little or no main ideas for annotations.


Part 1: Secondary Source Research Summary

(20% of Grade)

Suggested Time: 15 minutes
Directions: Summarize the argument of the text, To Make Our World Anew: A History of Africans in America by Robin D.G. Kelley and Earl Lewis titled, “Haiti and the Image of Freedom.” Then, identify two quotes that best relate to the overall argument of the text.


  1. Summary of Argument: In at least 3-4 sentences, summarize the main idea of the text in your own words (IYOW). The summary should include:

    • Discussion of the central idea of the text

    • Discussion of how the key ideas develop over the course of the text

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


  1. Select two quotes from the text that either best help to summarize the main idea of the text OR best help you to respond to the topic:

Quote 1: ___________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Quote 2: ___________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Part 2: Source Research

(20% of Grade)

Suggested Time: 35 Minutes
While Reading, Keep in Mind the Question: Should the Haitian Revolution be viewed as an extension of the French Revolution or a separate event?
Directions: Read, text code, annotate, and source (identify perspective, motive, and bias based on inferences made from the source information) the primary source documents provided. You will source the documents in the sourcing boxes provided below the document. Here is a step-by step guide for how to source documents. It is expected that the essay will include discussion and analysis based off of this sourcing.
You can accomplish this sourcing in any order, but it is highly suggested that you follow the steps provided on the example below:
Step 1 – Text code the source information, particularly focusing on date and origin

Step 2 – Text code the source context and make inferences about its

Step 3 – Based on the source information, determine the perspective(s) of the document

Step 4 – Read the document, paying specific attention to claims/ counterclaims that hint at motive and bias



Step 5 & 6 – Based off of inferences made during the previous 3 steps, identify motive and then bias.


Step 1

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Context provided to give background to document

Document text


Step 4
Document #


Step 2
SOURCE: Source Information
Source the document by providing an educated guess of the follow features:

Perspective:__(Be_sure_to_include_analysis_of_date_and_origin)____Step_3'>Perspective:

(Be sure to include analysis of date and origin)


Step 3



Motive:


Step 5
(Be sure to include an analysis of the source information and the document itself)

Bias:


Step 6
(Does the document express a point of view favors for or against anything? If so, how so?)

Perspective: Identify the point of view from which the document was written. This should include date and origin detail, particularly from the source information provided.


Motive: Make an educated guess as to what the creator of the document was trying to accomplish with the document. This should be based off of your analytical read of the source information, date, origin, and perspective.

Bias: Identify any viewpoint that expressed in the document that favors for or against a particular concept, group, or interpretation of the historical event.



While Reading, Keep in Mind the Question: Should the Haitian Revolution be viewed as an extension of the French Revolution or a separate event?

Article 2 - All slaves that shall be in our islands shall be baptized and instructed in the Roman, Catholic, and Apostolic Faith.
Article 22 - Each week masters will have to furnish to their slaves ten years old and older for their nourishment two and a half jars in the measure of the land, of cassava flour or three cassavas weighing at least two-and-a-half pounds each or equivalent things, with two pounds of salted beef or three pounds of fish or other things in proportion, and to children after they are weaned to the age of 10 years half of the above supplies.
Article 23 - We forbid them to give to the slaves cane brandy in place of the subsistence mentioned in the previous article.
Article 59 - We grant to freed slaves the same rights, privileges and immunities that are enjoyed by freeborn persons. We desire that they are deserving of this acquired freedom, and that this freedom gives them, as much for their person as for their property, the same happiness that natural liberty has on our other subjects.


Document 1
SOURCE: Excerpts from Le Code Noir (The Black Code) decreed by King Louis XIV in 1685.

Remained in force until 1848. French legal code for the regulation of
slavery in the West Indies, including sugar plantations in Saint Dominque

Source the document by providing an educated guess of the follow features:

Perspective:

Motive:

Bias:




Haitian Constitution 1801 (excerpted)

On Inhabitants

Art 3 — There can be no slaves on this territory; servitude has been forever abolished. All men are born, live and die there free and French.

On Religion

Art 6 — The Catholic religion, Apostolic and Roman, is the only one publicly professed.

On Men in Society
Art 12 — The Constitution guarantees individual freedom and safety. No one can be arrested except by virtue of a formally expressed order, issued by a functionary who the law gives the right to arrest and detain in a publicly designated place.
Art 13 — Property is sacred and inviolable. Every person, either by himself or his representatives, has the free disposal and administration of that which is recognized as belonging to him. Whoever infringes upon this right renders himself criminal towards society and responsible as concerns the person troubled in his property.

On Legislation

Art 19 — The regime of the colony is determined by the laws proposed by the governor and rendered by an assembly of inhabitants who gather at fixed periods in the center of the colony under the title of Central Assembly of Saint-Domingue.

On the Government

Art 28 — The Constitution names as governor Citizen Toussaint Louverture, General-in-Chief of the army of Saint-Domingue and, in consideration of the important services that the general has rendered to the colony in the most critical circumstances of the revolution, and per the wishes of the grateful inhabitants, the reins are confided to him for the rest of his glorious life.
Art. 39. – He shall supervise and censor by the authority of his commissaries, all writings designed for printing on the island; he shall cause to be suppressed all those coming from abroad that would tend to corrupt mores or trouble the new colony; he shall punish the authors or colporteurs, according to the severity of the situations.
Art. 40. – If the Governor is informed of some plot against the tranquility of the colony, he shall immediately proceed to the arrest of the presumed authors, instigators or accomplices; after having them undergo extra-judiciary questioning, he shall cite them in front of a competent tribunal.

Document 2


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