AE0060 Introduction to Islamic Archaeology



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AE0060

Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Instructor: Ian Straughn

Email: istraugh@brown.edu

Office: 309 in 70 Waterman

Office Hours: TBA

Course Times: MWF 9:00AM (B hour)

Course Website/Wiki:


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The Muslim world has increasingly become a major topic of contemporary discussion and academic research. While numerous disciplines from history to anthropology to political science have made major contributions to the study of Islamic civilization (religion, politics, cultures and peoples) the impact of a growing body of archaeological investigations has barely been perceived outside of a small group of specialists predominantly within departments of Near Eastern Studies. This course will offer students a survey of the sites, methods and conceptual issues that constitute the present state of Islamic period archaeology and its ability to provide us with knowledge about the Islamic tradition, Muslims and social worlds that they inhabit.

Our approach will be wide ranging in both its temporal and geographical scope given the historical and topographical extension of the Islamic tradition as a social, cultural and spiritual phenomenon. Although we will focus on the earlier periods, from the rise of Islam in Arabia through to the collapse of the Abbasid dynasty, we will also consider the growing research in the sub-specialties of Crusader and Ottoman period archaeology. Similarly, given that the majority of archaeological research has been concentrated in the Middle East and North Africa these regions will serve as the primary focus of our discussion. However, “peripheries” such as Andalusia (Spain), Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Central Asia, and even South-East Asia will also be addressed as part of an effort to probe questions of cultural syncretism and imperial expansion.

This course will concentrate on the presentation of archaeological materials in order to approach a number of topics of concern for the political, economic, and religious life of predominantly Muslim societies. They include: the spread of Islam, relations between confessional groups (Shi‘a, Sunnis, Christians, Jews, etc.), ritual/religious practice, urbanism, monumentality, continuities with the past, frontiers and jihād, sacred space, settlement patterns, tribal organization, political authority, and trade networks. However our concern with archaeological sites and artifacts will not be in isolation. We will also examine the texts (in translation) of important Muslim geographers, historians and religious scholars whose writings and representations bear on the interpretation of the material record. The goal will be to broaden the scope of Islamic archaeology beyond art historical concerns or the confirmation of political narrative histories. Instead we will turn towards a more anthropological appreciation of the intersection of political, socio-cultural and religious forces as the frame for investigating how materiality and textuality are linked in the constitution of the dynamics of Muslim societies and the Islamic tradition. This will ultimately allow us to rethink the relationship of text and artifact for the recuperation/production of the past and the use of that past in the present.



PREREQUISITES:

There are no prerequisites for this course. This is an “introduction” and my assumption is that students will come into this course with very different knowledge bases and skills. Some of you may have familiarity with archaeological thought, historical methods or social theory. Others may have backgrounds in the cultures, languages, history and politics of the Muslim world. All of these will be tremendously helpful as will those who might have training in art history, geography, literature or any number of other fields that will intersect with the materials of this course. It will be our collective task to share these interests and skills with each other in order to develop a dialogue that questions, challenges and complements the readings and each other, both inside and outside the classroom.

Any student who feels that they might not have the necessary background for this course is strongly encouraged to meet with me in the first two weeks of the course. This may simply be a matter of reassurance or to develop a supplemental study plan if that seems appropriate. Remember that this course is designed as an introductory survey course. While the material may be the focus of a rather specific interdisciplinary subfield, the themes and questions are intended to address broad questions in the social sciences and humanities (particularly archaeology, history, anthropology and religious studies).
COURSE GOALS:

1) Approaches to Muslim Societies


One of the main objectives in this course is to develop a set of questions and methods for the study of the Muslim world through its archaeological record. This cannot be accomplished in a vacuum that does not recognize the presumed centrality of texts in the production of historical knowledge about those societies in which Islam has been a dominant social, political and spiritual force. Students will be asked to become interdisciplinary scholars who must learn to navigate the linkages between different ways of knowing and weigh the value of different kinds of data.

Equally important, this course requires that students develop the conceptual tools and vocabulary for how to talk about Islam and Muslims. Our particular challenge will be to avoid their homogenization into a faceless block or conversely their fragmentation into an unrecognizable heterogeneity. The result of either of these extremes is that neither the notions of Islam nor Muslim hold any meaning in describing a particular faith tradition or group of people who identify with each other.


course will primarily develop their abilities to synthesize large amounts of information about a major historical civilization, its history, culture, religion and geography. They will also be engaged in developing clear written academic prose in which they construct arguments that employ their mastery of this information for probing large questions of anthropological, historical or even religious importance.his course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions aboutThis course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about empire, cultural and religious syncretism, and the role of archaeology as both a discipline which studies the materiality of social life and as a tool of anthropological and historical study. This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about empire, cultural and religious syncretism, and the role of archaeology as both a discipline which studies the materiality of social life and as a tool of anthropological and historical study. This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about empire, cultural and religious syncretism, and the role of archaeology as both a discipline which studies the materiality of social life and as a tool of anthropological and historical study. This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about empire, cultural and religious syncretism, and the role of archaeology as both a discipline which studies the materiality of social life and as a tool of anthropological and historical study. This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about empire, cultural and religious syncretism, and the role of archaeology as both a discipline which studies the materiality of social life and as a tool of anthropological and historical study.his course aims to provide students with a comprehensive background in the archaeological heritage of the Muslim World. This will serve to develop students’ knowledge of the history and cultures of the diverse regions in which Islam has had a major impact. It will serve as an entry into larger questions about

2) Knowledge Acquisition


At its most fundamental level this course asks students to develop and master a diverse body of knowledge about the archaeology and history of the Muslim world. Additionally students will be exposed to many of the basics in the development of the Islamic tradition in terms of its historical trajectory, arguments over its doctrine and practice, as well as the key concepts in its interdisciplinary study. That said, this course, however, is not intended as a replacement for either an Introduction to Islam class or a survey course in the history of the pre-modern Muslim world. While much of the same ground may be covered here it is done in relation to the archaeological record, its interpretation and its ability to shed light on the many themes mentioned above.
3) Skill Sets
This course will help to develop students’ abilities to synthesize large amounts of diverse information about a major world civilization. Throughout the course you should learn to recognize how different forms of evidence contradict and support arguments about the formation of political structures, cultural practices, social relations, and religious traditions.

A crucial aspect of this course will be a focus developing articulate, well reasoned academic prose. In our discussions and analyses of the readings we will examine the various ways in which archaeological, anthropological and historical data are used as forms of evidence. The various writing assignments will ask students to employ these techniques of argumentation in their own prose. This will force us to probe the methodological question: How do we go from pot sherds, architectural fragments, and partial building plans to discussions of political authority, religion, and social relations? It is in answering this question that we embark on the real work of developing an historical archaeology of the Muslim world. It is a project that will be marked by the particularly archaeological construction of a “middle range theory” consisting of the bridging arguments or warrants that link data to interpretive inference and hence to social analysis.



large amounts of information about a major historical civilization, its history, culture, religion and geography.

READINGS:


The following will be available at the University Bookstore for Purchase:
Insoll, T. 1999. The Archaeology of Islam. Oxford: Blackwell
Kennedy, H. 2004. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates : The Islamic Near East from the 6th to the 11th Century. 2nd ed. London: Longman
Nicolle, D. 2003. Historical Atlas of the Islamic World. Checkmark Books
Whitcomb, D. ed. 2003. Changing Social Identity with the Spread of Islam: Archaeological Perspectives. Chicago: Oriental Institute
Fowden, G. 2004. Qusayr ‘Amra: Art and the Umayyad Elite in Late Antique Syria. Berkeley: University of California
Hodges R. and D. Whitehouse. 1983. Mohammed, Charlemagne and the Origins of Europe. Ithica: Cornell University Press
Moreland, J. 2001. Archaeology and Text. London: Duckworth

All other required readings will be available through e-reserve or on the course’s Wiki. Some will additionally be available on-line and through the library e-resources.


Wiki:

This is an integral part of the course and will be your window into the material as well as many of the assignments. The goal of the wiki is to provide a venue for building this course as a collaborative project. In particular this will require your input in aspects of the course such as the glossary of terms and weblog of many of the images shown in class. We will discuss this in greater detail as the course progresses.


Recommended readings:

These will be put on reserve and are intended as a resource for further inquiry. Many of these readings are critiques and commentaries on the required readings and may be valuable for reference in the assignments. While I may refer to these readings in seminar, the expectation will be that you have not read them. They are there for those who may take a particular interest in the themes that emerge from a particular set of readings.


The following are important resources that you may want to consult throughout the semester:
The Encyclopedia of Islam 2nd ed. (there is an online version via the library’s electronic resources)
The Research Archives of the Oriental Institute at The University of Chicago

http://oilib.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/opac/o_search.html
Brice, William and Hugh Kennedy. 2003. An Historical Atlas of Islam. Leiden: Brill
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:



Course Grading
Preparation and engaged class participation (including wiki) – 15%

Writing Assignment #1 – 20%

Writing Assignment #2 – 30%

Midterm – 15%

Final – 20%
Class Participation:
Class participation (15% of your final grade) will be assessed not simply on the volume of one’s participation in discussions but on the quality and thoughtfulness of a student’s contribution. This is invariably a subjective measure, but it is important for students to consider whether they have a particular question that they want to address and how that relates to the readings. What I particularly want to see is that students demonstrate close reading skills by drawing on the texts themselves and offering analysis of an author’s argument. This might be in the form of showing how the archaeological evidence does not support the substantive claims of an article, or to ask for clarification of technical terms or theoretical concepts.

Included in the class participation grade are the various non-graded short assignments that will be part of the course which may include in-class debates, short presentations, or course wiki postings.


Attendance is absolutely mandatory. After the first two weeks of shopping period you will have two days of unexcused absences (use them wisely). Each additional unexcused absence will result in 1 point subtracted from your final total out of 100. Absences due to illness, personal/family emergency will be excused given sufficient verification. Excessive tardiness (10 minutes or more after the start of class) will result in ½ point subtracted from your final grade. You will learn very little from this class if you do not show up.
Writing Assignments – General Overview
This course will consist of two writing assignments. The first will be a short (1500-2000 word) take home essay topic that will ask students to draw on the readings from the course in order to address the question of the relationship of artifact to text and what is particular or not about the case of the pre-modern Muslim world.
The final paper (3000 words) will ask students to examine the data (both archaeological and textual) from a number of sites which will be provided as additional course readings. Your task will be to evaluate how these materials can be used to address any number of key themes that have been tackled throughout the course. These might include trade, warfare, conversion, colonialism, imperial expansion, religious or cultural syncretism, identity, tribal versus state-based political structures, etc.
Further details of each essay will be provided closer to the time of the actual assignment.
Writing assignments will be evaluated for both content and style. By style I mean that I expect papers to have been rigorously edited and be professional pieces of writing with proper citation formats, page numbers, title pages etc. In terms of content (and this will be the subject of separate handout) what I am looking for is a well structured argument that demonstrates a critical close engagement with the readings. I would much rather a paper that analyzed just two sentences of an article with close attention to language and their relationship to the author’s thesis than a personal commentary or literature review.
Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Any incidents of dishonest work will be reported to your academic advisor and the appropriate dean. I take all these matters seriously. If you feel that you are headed in this direction, see me immediately and we can solve this together, before it leads down the road of disciplinary action.
Midterm and Final
This course will have a midterm and a final. The midterm will consist solely of identifications and short answer questions. With identifications you will be given a particular word or phrase and will be asked correctly identify what it refers to and explain its significance. The short answer questions are more varied and may ask you to explain the difference between x and y, or outline the argument in such and such article which we read. There will likely also be a map that you will need to fill in. The final exam will follow much the same format though covering the whole of the course. It will also involve two essay questions that will ask you to reflect on one or more themes from the course. One of the assignments for the course will be for students to submit possible essay questions which may be used at my discretion (there will be extra credit for any such chosen exam questions).

Since one of the goals of this course is for you to learn key terms and issues in the archaeological study of the Muslim world we will be building a glossary of important terminology and topics that emerge from readings and discussion during the semester. This syllabus itself is an important reference for what some of these items are. These will be collected as a collaborative document on the wiki. This will serve as the basis from which identifications from the exam will be taken. It may not be absolutely comprehensive but the vast majority of what is on the exams will come from this glossary. Life has to have a few surprises.



Course Format
This course meets for three sessions each week. The general structure will be for me to give 40 minute lectures (more like informal presentations) with 10 minutes of Q&A. Throughout the course, and generally on Fridays there will be a number of discussion sections. These will serve as opportunities to discuss more specifically the accumulated readings and some of the larger themes and arguments that they present. During some of these sessions I may arrange for activities such as debates or presentations by the students.
Therefore, in terms of preparing the readings each week it would be helpful to have read them before the lectures though this is not essential. I will likely refer to them in my talks but will not assume that they are part of your working knowledge. However, it will be important to have read them in order to be prepared for the discussion sections. Before each discussion I will give you specific guidance about what is most important and which readings to have available in class.
Early in the semester there will also be a map assignment that will begin to orient you to the geography of the regions and periods that we will be studying.
CLASS SESSIONS – Topics, Readings and Assignments:



Week 1: Preliminaries
9/6: Course Introduction
9/8: Geography and Territory of the Muslim World
Readings:
Hodges R. and D. Whitehouse. 1983. Mohammed, Charlemagne and the Origins of Europe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press

Week 2: Preliminaries continued
9/11: Mohammed and Charlemagne – Why study the Muslim world?
9/13: The world before Islam – A picture of late antiquity East and West
9/15: The legacy of the Prophet – negotiating religion and politics in an emerging empire
Assignment:

Use the library reference resources to complete the blank map of the Muslim world with the list of toponyms provided.


Readings:
Nicolle, D. 2003. Historical Atlas of the Islamic World. Checkmark Books
Kennedy, H. 2004. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates: The Islamic Near East from the 6th to the 11th Century. 2nd ed. London: Longman (Chs. 1-6 pp 1-199)
Week 3: Defining Islamic Archaeology
9/18: Disciplinary beginnings – art history, history, and religious studies
9/20: Islam, identity and material culture
9/22: Discussion

Map assignment due
Readings:
Insoll, T. 1999. The Archaeology of Islam. Oxford: Blackwell (Chapters 1, 4 and 8)
Whitcomb, D. ed. 2003. Changing Social Identity with the Spread of Islam: Archaeological Perspectives. Chicago: Oriental Institute (Introduction pp 1-7)
Horton, Mark C. 2003. Islam, Archaeology, and Swahili Identity. In Changing Social Identity with the Spread of Islam: Archaeological Perspectives. D. Whitcomb ed. 67-88. Chicago: Oriental Institute.
Johns, J. (2003). "Archaeology and the History of Early Islam." JESHO 46(4): 411-436.

Northedge, A. (1999). Archaeology and Islam. Companion Encyclopedia of Archaeology. G. Barker. London, Routledge: 1077-1107.

Peterson, A. (2005). "What is 'Islamic' Archaeology." Antiquity 79: 100-106.

Walmsley, A. (2004). Archaeology and Islamic Studies: The development of a relationship. From Handaxe to Khan: Essays presented to Peder Mortensen on the occasion of his 70th birthday. K. v. Folsach, H. Thrane and I. Thuesen. Aarhus, Aarhus University Press.



Week 4: Frameworks of an Historical Archaeology
9/25: Sites, texts and cultures: What are the objects of study?
9/27: Religion, civilization, and History: What do we want to know about?
9/29: Discussion
Readings:
Messier, R. (1997). Rereading Medieval Sources through Multidisciplinary Glasses. The Maghrib in question : essays in history & historiography. M. Le Gall and K. J. Perkins. Austin, University of Texas Press: 174-200.

Moreland, J. 2001. Archaeology and Text. London: Duckworth


Week 5: Arabia – Where it all began
10/2: Mecca and Medina – The sacred precincts of Islam (al-haramayn)
10/4: The origins of the mosque and its later institutional role
10/6: Discussion

Paper 1 assignment hand-out
Readings:
Donner, F. M. (1998). The Role of Nomads in the Near East in Late Antiquity (400-800 CE). The Arabs and Arabia on the Eve of Islam. F. E. Peters. Burlington, Vt., Ashgate: 21-33.
Sauvaget, J. (2002 [1947]). The Mosque and the Palace. Early Islamic Art and Architecture. J. Bloom. Burlington, VT, Ashgate: 109-148.

Sergeant, R. B. (1998). Haram and Hawtah, the Sacred Enclave in Arabia. The Arabs and Arabia on the Eve of Islam. F. E. Peters. Burlington, Vt., Ashgate: 167-84.

Walmsley, A. and K. Damgaar (2005). "The Umayyad congregational mosque of jarash in Jordan and its relationship to early mosques." Antiquity 79: 362-378.

Insoll, T. 1999. The Archaeology of Islam. Oxford: Blackwell (Ch. 2)


al-Muqaddasi (1994). The best divisions for knowledge of the regions : a translation of Ahsan al-taqasim fi marifat al-aqalim. Reading, UK, Centre for Muslim Contribution to Civilisation : Garnet Publishing. (Section on Arabian Peninsula)


Week 6: Continuity and Rupture in the Early Islamic Landscape
10/9: No Class (Columbus Day?)
10/11: Urban transformations and Muslim settlement

Readings:


'Athamina, K. (1986). "Arab Settlement During the Umayyad Caliphate." Jerusalem Studies of Arabic and Islam 8: 185-207.
Donner, F. M. (1981). The early Islamic conquests. Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press.

Kennedy, H. (1985). "From Polis to Medina." Past and Present 106: 3-27.


Johns, J. (1994). The longue duree state and settlement strategies in southern Transjordan across the Islamic centuries. Village, steppe and state : the social origins of modern Jordan. E. L. Rogan and T. Tell. London ; New York, British Academic Press: 65-93.
Morony, M. (1992). Land Use and Settlement Patterns in Early Islamic Syria and Iraq. The Byzantine and early Islamic Near East: Land use and settlement patterns. G. R. D. King and A. Cameron. Princeton, NJ, Darwin Press. 2: 221-230

Whitcomb, D. (1994). "Amsar in Syria? Syrian cities after the Conquest." ARAM 6: 13-33.


Magness, Jodi. 2003. Khirbet Abu Suwwana and Ein ‘Aneva: Two Early Islamic Settlements on Palestine’s Desert Periphery. In Changing Social Identity with the Spread of Islam: Archaeological Perspectives. D. Whitcomb ed. 67-88. Chicago: Oriental Institute.
Ibn Khaldun, M. (1958). The Muqaddimah : an introduction to history. New York, Pantheon Books. [Vol 2. pages ???]
10/13: NO CLASS (to be rescheduled) Writing an Academic Argument (review handout)

Week 7: Continuity and Rupture in the Landscape (cont.)

10/16: Conquest and colonialism - Landscape continuities and disruptions


Paper 1 due in class
10/18: Umayyad Monumentality - Case study of the “desert castles”
10/20: Midterm (30min) Discussion
Readings:
Bacharach, J. (1996). "Marwanid building activities: speculations on patronage." Muqarnas 13: 27-44.

Khoury, N. (1993). "The Dome of the Rock, the Ka'ba, and Ghumdan: Arab Myths and Umayyad Monuments." Muqarnas 10: 57-65.

Fowden, G. 2004. Qusayr ‘Amra: Art and the Umayyad Elite in Late Antique Syria. Berkeley: University of California (Preface and Chapters 1, 2, 9 and 10)
Ibn Khaldun, M. (1958). The Muqaddimah : an introduction to history. New York, Pantheon Books. [Vol 2. pages ???]
Week 8: Urbanism in the early Muslim world
10/23: The problem of the “Islamic city”
10/25: Amsār and early urban foundations
10/27: Royal cities of the post-Umayyad period
Readings:

Abu-Lughod, J. L. (1987). "The Islamic City--Historic Myth, Islamic Essence, and Contemporary Relevance." International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 19(155-76).

AlSayyad, N. (1991). Cities and caliphs : on the genesis of Arab Muslim urbanism. New York, Greenwood Press.

Northedge, A. (2005). "Remarks on Samarra and the archaeology of large cities." Antiquity 79: 119-129.


Northedge, A. (1992). Archaeology and New Urban Settlement in Early Islamic Syria and Iraq. The Byzantine and early Islamic Near East: Land use and settlement patterns. G. R. D. King and A. Cameron. Princeton, NJ, Darwin Press. 2: 231-266.

Scanlon, G. (1992). Al-Fustat: The riddle of the Earliest Settlement. The Byzantine and early Islamic Near East: Land use and settlement patterns. G. R. D. King and A. Cameron. Princeton, NJ, Darwin Press. 2: 171-180.




Week 9: Urban life
10/30: Trade and industrial production
11/1: Domestic architecture and the space of everyday life
11/3: Discussion
Readings:
Henderson, J. and e. al. (2005). "Experiment and innovation: early Islamic industry at al-Raqqa, Syria." Antiquity 79: 103-45.
Hoffman, Tracy. 2003. Ascalon on the Levantine Coast. In Managing Social Identity with the Spread of Islam: Archaeological Perspectives. D. Whitcomb ed. 67-88. Chicago: Oriental Institute.
Insoll, T. 1999. The Archaeology of Islam. Oxford: Blackwell (Ch. 3, 7 and pages 151-165)
Goitein, S. D. 1967. A Mediterranean society : the Jewish communities of the Arab world as portrayed in the documents of the Cairo Geniza. Berkeley, University of California Press. Volume 4 “Daily Life” pp. 1-81.

Week 10: The Edges of Empire
11/6: Frontiers and Fortifications
11/8: The view from Muslim Spain
11/10: Discussion

Paper 2 assignment handout
Readings:
Kennedy, Hugh. 2005. Muslim Military Architecture in Greater Syria from the Coming of Islam to the Ottoman Period: From the Coming of Islam to the Ottoman. (selected articles)
Glick, T. F. (1995). From Muslim fortress to Christian castle: social and cultural change in medieval Spain. Manchester England: Manchester University Press
Suggested case study reading:
Redford, S., G. Stein, et al. (1998). The archaeology of the frontier in the medieval Near East : excavations at Gritille, Turkey. Philadelphia: University Museum Publications University of Pennsylvania.

Week 11: Contact with the West
11/13: Archaeology and the Crusader Principalities (possible guest lecture by Dr. Ronnie Ellenblum) – Please note that from November 12-14 there will be the Jerusalem conference. There will be many useful panels which you are strongly encouraged to attend. See the conference website for more details. http://www.brown.edu/Conference/Jerusalem_Perspective/
11/15: Before European Hegemony
11/17: No Class (to be rescheduled) Preserving cultural heritage in the Islamic world
Readings:

Boas, A. J. (1999). Crusader archaeology: the material culture of the Latin East. London: Routledge. (Chapter 4)

Ellenblum, R. (1996). "Colonization Activities in the Frankish East: The Example of Castellum Regis (Mi'ilya) " English Historical Review: 104-122.

Pringle, D. (2000). Fortification and settlement in Crusader Palestine. BurlingtonVT: Ashgate/Variorum. (chapters 1, 2, and 4)


Abu-Lughod, J. L. (1989). Before European hegemony : the world system A.D. 1250-1350.Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Pages 3-40, 102-134, 137-151,185-245)
Boone, J., J. Myers, et al. (1990). "Archaeological and Historical Approaches to Complex Societies: The Islamic States of Medieval Morocco." American Anthropologist 92: 630-646.
Handout: Articles on cultural heritage from Islamica Magazine 2006
Week 12:
11/20: The material culture of everyday life
11/22: Optional class discussion/review session
11/24: Thanksgiving break. Enjoy!
Readings:
Bulliet, R. W. (1992). Pottery Styles and Social Status in Medieval Khurasan. Archaeology, Annales and Ethnohistory. A. B. Knapp. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Mason, R. B. (2004). Shine like the sun: lustre-painted and associated pottery from the medieval Middle East. Costa Mesa: Mazda Publishers.
Hasan, A. Y. and D. R. Hill (1986). Islamic technology : an illustrated history. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bernsted, Ane-Marie. 2005. Early Islamic Pottery. Archetype



Week 13: Trade and the Intrusion of Europe
11/27: Ports and commerce
11/29: Trade and travel of the eve of European expansion
12/1: Discussion of Redman’s Qasr es-Seghir
Readings:
Kawatoko, M. (2001). Coffee trade in the al-Tur Port. Le commerce du café avant l'ère des plantations coloniales : espaces, réseaux, sociétés (XVe-XIXe siècle). M. Tuchscherer. Cairo, Institut français d'archéologie orientale: 51-66.

Redman, C. L. (1986). Qasr es-Seghir : an archaeological view of medieval life. Orlando: Academic Press.


Chittick, H. N. (1974). Kilwa: an Islamic trading city on the East African coast. Nairobi, British Institute in Eastern Africa.

Porter, V. (2002). The ports of Yemen and the Indian Ocean trade during the Tahirid period (1454-1517). Studies on Arabia in honour of Professor G.Rex Smith: Journal of Semitic Studies Supplement, 14. J.F. Healey and V. Porter. 171-190. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Suggested readings:
Kawatoko, M. (2005). "Multi-disciplinary approaches to the Islamic period in Egypt and the Red Sea coast." Antiquity 79: 844-57.


Week 14: Temporal and Spatial Peripheries of the Islamic World
12/4: Islamic archaeology in Sub-Saharan Africa
12/6: Ottoman period archaeology
12/8: The politics of Islamic archaeology
Readings:
Silberman, N. A. (1989). Tobacco Pipes, Cotton Prices, and Progress (Ch 13). Between past and present : archaeology, ideology, and nationalism in the modern Middle East. New York: H. Holt. (pages 228-243)

Insoll, T. (2003). The archaeology of Islam in sub-Saharan Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapters 1, 7 and 9)


Baram, U. and L. Carroll eds. (2000). A historical archaeology of the Ottoman Empire: breaking new ground. New York: Kluwer Academic. (Chapters 1, 5, 6, 10 and 11).
Week 15:
12/11: Review Session – Paper 2 due in class
Finals Week
Final exam is scheduled for Wed. December 13 at 9:00am (plan for 2 hours)

(Please advise me at least one week prior to this date if you have a scheduling conflict)




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