Writing to Argue and Persuade



Download 13.75 Kb.
Date11.07.2017
Size13.75 Kb.

Writing to Argue and Persuade

  • Icons key:
  • For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation
  • Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page
  • Accompanying worksheet
  • Flash activity. These activities are not editable.
  • Web addresses
  • Extension activities
  • of 23
  • © Boardworks Ltd 2006

Learning Objectives

  • © Boardworks Ltd 2006
  • of 23
  • In this unit you will…
  • Be taught to write a successful counter-argument
  • Write informatively by giving a balanced analysis
  • Analyse issues from different perspectives
  • Practise writing persuasively

How to inform and argue

  • radio discussions
  • essays
  • letters
  • newspaper articles
  • interviews
  • formal reports
  • chat shows
  • leaflets.
  • People argue, inform and persuade through various forms of writing and speaking. For example:
  • Can you think of any other arenas or media in which people argue their point of view?

Introduction to writing to argue

  • I can’t believe you think that foxhunting is a sport, Lei. It’s barbaric and should never be allowed to happen!
  • I really don’t see what the big deal is, Megan. It’s just a fun passtime and foxes are farm pests so it’s useful…
  • Who do you think is right? How could Megan and Lei improve their arguments?

Writing to argue

  • Megan and Lei could improve their arguments by making counter-arguments. This is done by acknowledging the other person’s argument and then countering it with facts, e.g.
  • Yes, x is true BUT so is y AND MORE IMPORTANTLY z.
  • Yes, foxhunting does control pests but it is a painful way for the fox to die. And hunts encourage violence and brutality.
  • Yes, foxhunting may be painful for the fox but so is death by a trap. Also hunts create many jobs in rural communities.

Foxhunting

  • Which girl has made the best argument?

Whaling

  • Read the text below and pick out the key arguments. Then write a counter-argument in response. Remember to use the formula:
  • Yes, x is true BUT so is y AND MORE IMPORTANTLY z.
  • Whaling is wrong and has been banned, but it still occurs in some parts of the world illegally. It is endangering many species of whale which are essential parts of the marine food chain. The whales are killed using explosive harpoons. This is a horrifically cruel practice because it can take hours for the whales to die. Whale meat products are also full of toxins which are harmful to humans, so whales are not even a good source of food.

Informative writing

  • Think about the following questions:
  • Should parents be allowed to smack their own children?
  • Should animal testing for medical research be allowed?
  • Should 16-year-olds be given the right to vote?
  • In your KS3 test you will need to show that you can view an issue from more than one perspective.
  • This can be difficult when you feel very strongly about the subject, but it is an important skill to learn.
  • Do you have an opinion on any of them?

Informative writing

  • When you are asked to write informatively in your KS3 exams you will need to accurately describe both the advantages and disadvantages of a particular situation, i.e. you will have to give a balanced analysis.
  • When you write an informative piece you must present the issue fairly and show that you can see a subject from more than one perspective – unlike Megan and Lei:
  • Foxhunting is cruel!
  • Foxhunting creates jobs!
  • Remember: there are two sides to everything!

CCTV cameras

  • CCTV cameras seem to be everywhere. But are they a protection or a plague?
  • If you are a driver, you’ll know how irritating speed cameras can be, positioned on nearly every major road in Britain. They are meant to stop you from driving too fast. However, other types of camera can be useful in preventing burglary and street crime.
  • How does the writer try to present a balanced analysis of CCTV cameras?
  • Read this text about CCTV cameras:

Should animals be kept in captivity?

  • Use the grid below to write down all of the arguments for and against keeping animals in captivity.
  • Yes
  • No

Should animals be kept in captivity?

  • Using the grid you made, write an article which informatively details both the advantages and disadvantages of zoos.
  • Remember: try to hide your own views for now.

Writing to inform and argue

  • The most effective way to argue is by presenting your readers with a balanced analysis, similar to the way you have been learning to write informatively.
  • This shows that you know there are two sides to the argument. And it shows you are willing to consider the views of others before coming to your own conclusions.
  • You will also need to give reasons for your conclusions; it is no good having an opinion if it cannot be explained!
  • When you have an opinion to express, there are good and bad ways of arguing your case.

Writing to persuade

  • You should now feel comfortable presenting arguments by writing informatively. However, you also need to be able to write persuasively in your KS3 exams.
  • Persuasive writing is an important skill because it will help you to convince your readers that your opinion is the right one through the language you use and the facts you provide.
  • I want to write a persuasive letter to my local MP to ask her to ban foxhunting on private land…

Credit cards

  • Read the extract below which presents a balanced view of credit card usage. It is currently informative writing.
  • How has the writer managed to present a balanced view?
  • How do you think readers will respond to this writing?
  • Credit cards provide consumers with the funds to buy those things which are beyond their immediate means. With a credit card, it is no longer necessary for shoppers to carry around large sums of cash. Of course they have their disadvantages. Many people rely on their credit cards and find themselves spending more than they can repay, which results in huge debts with high interest rates.

Credit cards

  • Credit cards provide consumers with the funds to buy those things which are beyond their means. With a credit card, it is no longer necessary for shoppers to carry around large sums of cash, but they cannot see their money being dwindled away.
  • Many vulnerable people come to rely on their credit cards and find themselves spending much more than they can ever afford to repay. This results in huge debts with ridiculously high interest rates and serious stress for the poor naive shopper.
  • Credit cards provide consumers with the funds to buy those things which are beyond their means. With a credit card, it is no longer necessary for shoppers to carry around large sums of cash, but they cannot see their money being dwindled away.
  • Many vulnerable people come to rely on their credit cards and find themselves spending much more than they can ever afford to repay. This results in huge debts with ridiculously high interest rates and serious stress for the poor naive shopper.
  • The writer uses emotive language (language that causes strong feelings) to sound persuasive.

Credit cards

  • Credit cards provide consumers with the funds to buy those things which are beyond their immediate means. With a credit card, it is no longer necessary for shoppers to carry around large sums of cash. Of course they have their disadvantages. Many people rely on their credit cards and find themselves spending more than they can repay which results in huge debts with high interest rates.
  • Rewrite this extract to convince readers that credit cards are useful and advantageous for shoppers.
  • Try to use emotive language. Think of what may concern your readers and offer them reassurance.

Persuasive statements

  • Different techniques are used by writers to produce persuasive arguments.
  • Although the statements above present different opinions, they do so in a similar way.
  • It is commonly accepted that animals are happier when out in wide open spaces.
  • Everyone knows that keeping animals in zoos improves their chances of survival.
  • No one can doubt that zoos are cruel places.
  • It is commonly accepted that animals are happier when out in wide open spaces.
  • Everyone knows that keeping animals in zoos improves their chances of survival.
  • No one can doubt that zoos are cruel places.
  • What do the sentences have in common and why may this help to persuade readers?

Persuasive questions

  • What is the point in keeping animals caged up for the pleasure of humans?
  • If animals are so mistreated in zoos then why do zoos remain so popular?
  • What is the purpose of these questions?
  • Can you think of your own similar questions?
  • Do you know what these types of questions are called?

Rhetorical questions activity

Factual information and statistics

  • Another way to persuade readers is to provide them with factual information (dates, names and numbers) backed up with statistics. This makes the writer appear very knowledgeable.
  • The Banking Bureau carried out its audit across 72 insurance companies and banks. By 1st June this year, it had reviewed around sixty per cent of those insurance companies and banks which offer ROT services and more than nine out of ten banks which provide services at Tiers 2, 3 and 4 of the now widely accepted 4 Tier Model.
  • Can you pick out the factual information and statistics in this extract?
  • Note: you will need to use the evidence provided in your KS3 exams to back up your persuasive writing.

Writing to inform or persuade

Writing a persuasive letter

  • Should animal testing be banned for cosmetic research?
  • Write a letter to the director of a cosmetics company to persuade them to stop testing on animals.
  • Include some persuasive techniques and write in an appropriate tone and style. Try to anticipate their responses and offer counter-arguments.


Download 13.75 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page