Wisbech & Fenland Museum Museum Square Tel 01945 583817 Wisbech



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Wisbech & Fenland Museum

Museum Square Tel 01945 583817

Wisbech



Cambs PE13 1ES Fax 01945 589050

info@wisbechmuseum.org.uk

Townshend Manuscript Collection

Appendices




Townshend Manuscript Collection

Appendices

Contents


Introduction to the Collection……………………………4

Who was Chauncy Hare Townshend?

The origins and progress of his Autograph Collection

An analysis of the original folders holding the documents

Interesting items within the collection other than signatures

References to Mesmerism

The breadth & content of the collection

Alphabetical listings…….…..……………………………10

Detailed listings, with descriptions, content and biographical notes

A: Abernethy (1) onwards…………………………………….10

B: Baillie (9)……..……………………………………………...18

C: Calame (52)…………………………………………………63

D: Danby (98)………………………………………………….110

E: Eastlake (115)………………………………………………127

F: Faraday (124)……………………………………………….137

G: Gall (137)…………………………………………………....150

H:Hamann (153)……………………………………………….166

J: James II (170)………………………………………………..183

K: Karr (174)…………………………………………………….187

L: La Place (182)………………………………………………..195

M: Macaulay (211)…………………………………....................227

N: Napoleon (246)……………………………………………….262

O: Oehlenschläger (251)………………………………………..268

P: Paley (257)…………………………………………………….275

Q: Quillinan (281)………………………………………………...299

R: Réaumur (283)………………………………………………..301

S: St. Piérre (301)………………………………………………...320

T: Talma (331)…………………………………………………….350

V: Valpy (344)……………………………………………………..364

W: Walter (351)……………………………………………………371

Portfolio Seven
Brief listing of contents

Supplementary material
With descriptions, content and biographical notes

Puttick & Simpson letters
Brief description of letters





Introduction






INTRODUCTION TO THE AUTOGRAPH COLLECTION OF CHAUNCY HARE TOWNSHEND
The word autograph in this collection means ‘hand writing’ and not, as it is commonly understood to mean, ‘signature’. Not all the documents are signed by those who wrote them but all are believed to be in the authenticated hand of the person whose name is attached to the document.
The earliest document in the collection with a definite date was written in 1548 by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. and the most recent collected by CHT himself, bearing in mind that he died in 1868, was by Michael Faraday in 1857. Henry Hare Townsend was probably the initiator of the collection (See VII.26) to which his son Chauncy added throughout his life. Chauncy Hare Townshend died in 1868 and left the collection to The Wisbech and Fenland Museum in his will. The Collection has since been added to during its time in the Museum.

1. Who was Chauncy Hare Townshend?
He was many things: a poet, ordained clergyman, practitioner of Mesmerism, collector, traveller and possibly linguist (though this is not certain), dilettante, man of property, Victorian gentleman and socialite. He was born in 1798. His father, Henry Hare Townsend (of Downhills, Tottenham, Busbridge Hall, Goldaming and Walpole, Norfolk) died in 1827. His mother, Charlotte, the daughter of Sir James Lake of Edmonton, died 1831.

Chauncy was educat:ed at Eton College and Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He completed his BA in 1821, and his MA in 1824: he obtained the Chancellor’s Medal for English with the poem Jerusalem in 1817. Although Chauncy took Holy Orders he was disabled by illness from active duties.

He Published Poems in 1821 after encouragement from Robert Southey whom he met and visited at his home in Keswick. Sermons in Sonnets and other Poems was published 30 years later in 1851 and The Three Gates in 1859. His best known poem is the ballad Burning of the Amazon (1852). CHT often sent volumes of his poetry as an introduction to persons he wished to know - and as a means of obtaining their signature for his collection. The poems made an easy way of establishing a relationship with someone especially if they too were a writer or an aspiring poet.


He collected jewels, paintings and a variety of antiquities and had a growing interest in collecting autographs. He travelled widely and spent the latter part of his life at his villa Mon Loisir (my leisure) in Lausanne.

In 1826 he married Eliza Norcott. They left no issue and were later separated and she lived with her sister, outlived Chauncy, and later died in an asylum.

Other works include:

1823-24 Contributions to Knight’s “Quarterly Magazine”.

1840 A Descriptive Tour of Scotland

1840 Facts in Mesmerism

1844 2nd edition

1844 Supplement to Lang’s Animal Magnetism.

1854 Mesmerism Proved True.

1869 Religious Opinions published posthumously by Charles Dickens, his literary executor.



A letter in the collection also shows that he wrote for the Literary Gazette, and was acquainted with its editor, William Jerdan: the collection contains many letters addressed to him. Chauncy died in London on 25 February, 1868. In his will of 1861 he left half of his collection to the Victoria & Albert Museum and half – including his autograph collection – to Wisbech Museum (now Wisbech & Fenland Museum).

2. The origins and development of his autograph collection
Facts about his collection can only be gained from the collection itself and from the documents held in The Wisbech and Fenland Museum. Speculative conclusions after researching the Autograph collection are broadly as follows:
2.1 Chauncy’s father was a collector and employed the services of an auctioneer, J. Weller (see portfolio VII.26)

2.2 Chauncy inherited his father’s collection in 1827

2.3 In 1820, while still an undergraduate at Trinity College, and having made the acquaintance of Southey, he gave his autograph to E. D. Clarke (1769-1822 see portfolio III.14), traveller, antiquarian and mineralogist, who in turn sent him Byron’s signature. Twenty years after Clark’s death in1822, when his collections were auctioned, Chauncy bought his autograph collection (Including the letter of Thos. Gray (see former reference II.30) and probably other items. In 1847, Townshend employed the services of auctioneers himself (Puttick and Simpson) who acquired numerous signatures for him including those of most of his royal and historical personalities.

2.4 It seems that during the late summer months for many years Chauncy visited the Lake District and spent time with the Southey, Coleridge and Wordsworth families until the lingering death of the Poet Laureate from 1840 onwards, after which he spent frequent and longer periods on the Continent.

2.5 His collection shows that there he personally met and talked to many men and women of science, literature and the stage and was careful always to gather their autographs and those of well known acquaintances and connections. It was in Antwerp that he was first introduced to mesmerism and set up experiments to test its validity. He seems always to have returned to England in the Spring.

2.6 There are a lot of signatures in the collection taken from his personal correspondence of earlier years. When people who had once held no significance had become noteworthy they were then given folders within his autograph collection. An example is Hugh McNeile who in 1830 had written to Chauncy asking for a reference for a servant and was at that date an unknown clergyman. A folder was made for him in 1860 and marked in Chauncy’s hand with this information when he became Dean of Ripon. It would seem Chauncy kept and filed every letter he received - and there must have been thousands - even if only about a trivial matter. McNeile would also have become known to Chauncy in later years as an outspoken opponent of Mesmerism

2.7 In the intervening years he casually collected important signatures as his social circle widened. He often wrote invitations to well known visitors to London to dine with him in order to obtain their signatures with their replies. His closest friends knew of his collection and people such as Charles Dickens passed on the signatures of their many famous acquaintances to Chauncy.

2.8 One often reads in this correspondence of people who ‘for many years have wished to make his acquaintance’. His reputation as a mesmerist had gone before him. Contrary to what might have been later assumed it was not John Elliotson who taught Chauncy the art of Mesmerism. The latter had well established his practice of mesmerism abroad long before he met Elliotson as a practitioner in England. However we find hints in his collection that in England too his motives for practising mesmerism were far from a kind of showmanship or desire for mounting displays of the miraculous, to entertain and amaze. Chauncy was always aware of his Christian vocation and that he had taken Holy Orders and, not able to minister within a congregation in the ordinary way, he attempted to use mesmerism to help distressed friends. See John Forster’s letter to him III.28 and Charles Collin’s letter in IV.14. Collins was a man who suffered greatly and died an early death. It is significant that in this letter he addresses Chauncy as ‘My Dear Physician’.

2.9 The number of letters addressed to Dr. John Elliotson in the collection suggest that the latter gave his correspondence to Chauncy, some years before he died . They both died in the same year. There are also several letters written by or addressed to the nonconformist preacher and hymn writer Philip Dodderidge which were probably bought at an auction of Dodderidge’s memorabilia. Two of the latter’s letters to his wife are remarkable for their expressions of humorous affection and tenderness. Another frequent recipient of letters in the collection was a William Wethered esq. from Kings Lynn who appears to have been an art dealer or collector. The Dictionary of National Biography throws no light on him. Either he was a friend of CHT or the latter bought up collection of his letters. This perhaps explains why the autographs of so many 19th century artists (approx 40) are included in his collection

2.10 Those in Wisbech and its surroundings who have known about the collection have made their own contributions to it over the years, notably the Hon. Lady Alexandrina Peckover and the poetess Christina Rossetti. The latter stayed with a friend in Wisbech and called it ‘a place of a thousand beauties’ and, through her friend, donated the autograph of the Actor John Phillip Kemble to the Townshend Collection.

3. An Analysis of the Original Folders holding the Documents
Portfolios I-VI were made up of buff coloured folders marked with the name of the autograph they contain. Some of these folders belonged to Chauncy himself and can be divided into several categories

3.1 Those with cuttings from an auction catalogue on the front - probably cut up and stuck on by Chauncy.

3.2 Those marked with the name of the auctioneers Puttick and Simpson and the lot number and the date 7.8.1847. These form a large number and were all bought at 3 sales around 1847 (see the file for Puttick and Simpson). The folders were inscribed at the museum

3.3 Some folders must have remained unmarked and the same hand wrote the names on later; post 1942, see eg. VI.41 inscribed after it was given.

3.4 Those named by Chauncy himself when he was quite old and his script rather shaky. See section 2.6, above.



4. Interesting items within the collection other than the Signatures
Throughout the folders are many prints of engravings eg of Philip Dodderidge, William Betty, Napoleon, Samuel Richardson etc. They are very finely done and take the place of the modern photograph. For example the portrait of Charlotte Smith the novelist (portfolio II.65) appears to have been taken from the front of one of her books.

Other items include music: such as the music score decorated and signed by Jenny Lind., and the few bars of music dedicated to Chauncy by the Belgian composer Vieuxtemps. Sketchings and stages in the development of a drawing are included in the letter of Benjamin Haydon. There is also the finely lined portrait of an African head drawn by Johan Kasper Lavator the physiognomist.

Most royal items are official documents but the letter of Charles II is a personal note to his sister describing the day’s skirmishes with the Dutch fleet.

5. References to Mesmerism
Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815) was a physician born near Constance, Austria. He studied and practised medicine at Vienna and c.1772 took up the idea that there exists a force which he called animal magnetism. This led to the founding of mesmerism, precursor of hypnotism . In 1778 he went to Paris where he created a sensation curing diseases at séances. In 1785 when a learned commission pronounced him an impostor he retired to Switzerland.

Chauncy was a advocate and practitioner of Mesmerism. During his time on the Continent, it was in Antwerp that he was first introduced to mesmerism and set up experiments to test its validity. There too he was taught to master the practice for himself and as he moved south to Paris and Italy in the colder months found opportunities to use his new found skills, not only as a demonstration of the bizarre but, as he wished to do, to help ease the pain of chronic sufferers and soothe the last days of the dying. He seems always to have returned to England in the Spring.

There are 14 letters in the Collection which make reference to Mesmerism. These are those by Elliotson, Heraud, Martineau, Mayo, Milnes (2 of), Milner-Gibson, Roget, 4th Earl Stanhope, Sir James Tennant, Trollope and Whateley (2 of).

The letter of Harriet Martineau is an exception in that it refers directly to Mesmerism. Chauncy’s involvement is generally referred to obliquely eg Bulwer-Lytton’s reference to a group of his friends eager to witness Chauncy’s ‘marvel’. Charles Allston Collins, the son-in-law of Dickens and preRaphaelite painter who suffered greatly before an early death significantly addresses Chauncy in his letter as ‘My dear Physician’, indicating Chauncy ‘s desire to bring healing and reduce pain through mesmeric séances. The impression is given that Chauncy had a closely knit group of friends who were drawn together by Mesmerism. These include Dickens, Charles Collins, Wilkie Collins, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Dr. John Elliotson and others.

The latter seems to have been the centre of this group with a reputation which reached into Europe. However there was a tendency to secrecy and indirectness amongst those with an interest in mesmerism. Hints within the collection give clues as to who were part of a wider circle with interest in mesmerism. These included medically trained men, see, for example portfolio V.38 and the entry on Mayo in the Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) and the Monckton Milnes folders portfolio V.40 and 41 which include letters from Thos. Milner Gibson MP and his wife Susannah, whose home was open to séances. They also mention Daniel Home - a medium - who had, according to his DNB entry, the most active influence upon of the 19th century mesmerists. He travelled extensively in America, Britain, Europe and Russia. (Bibliography: Heyday of a Wizard, Jean Barton, Geo. Harrap,1949) William Thackeray’s letter to Elliotson (portfolio III.70) is both amusing and touching. Mesmerism not only bound them into a mutual relationship but Elliotson was the Thackeray family doctor and this witty and strangely touching letter implies that Elliotson saved Thackery’s life. The question left hanging in the air is: Through mesmerism?

6. The Breadth and content of the collection
The main collection includes a total of 581 documents, divided between 367 writers. The bulk of the collection is in English, but there are also items in French (80 no.), German (12 no.), Italian (7 no.), Spanish (1 no.), Latin (2 no.), and Danish (1 no.).

The letters, notes and documents can be divided into categories, with authors representing every conceivable activity. The most notable by its absence when compared with today would be the category of sportsmen and women, whilst almost unknown today would be occupations such as Phrenologist and Physiognomist. These feature in the collection along with British and foreign monarchs (29 no.); Statesmen and Politicians (27 no.); Writers - historians, philosophers, journalists, editors, novelists and poets (101 no.); Publishers, Scientists - geologists, naturalists, chemists (20 no.); Theologians, preachers, hymnologists and missionaries (28); Musicians, performers and composers (including Beethoven, Leopold Mozart and Mendelssohn) (14 no.); Artists, caricaturists, and sculptors of which there were many contemporary painters and members of and exhibitors at the Royal Academy, only some of whom are well known today (45 no.); and Actors and performers, some now in obscurity (17 no.). The collection also includes a few Doctors and medical men, some like Edward Jenner, who changed the face of history by his work (6 no.). Other occupations include: the Armed services (11 no.); Educationalists (4 no.); Explorers (2 no.); Historians (9 no.); Philanthropists and Social Reformers (4 no.); Philosophers (3 no.); Scientists (20 no.); Travellers & Antiquarians (6 no.) and others (13 no).

The Collection includes lesser-known men and women who - although popular in Townshend’s time - failed to become known to posterity A few are altogether unknown today eg Ennemoser. Information about him comes internally from within the collection itself (see former ref. V.38). There are almost as many foreign personalities as there are British, many of the former known personally to Chauncy, whose travels abroad enhanced the number of his acquaintances and correspondents. Only one letter, probably acquired towards the end of his life, was misattributed by Chauncy, that of John Lavington, not as he thought, George, bishop of Exeter, but a Presbyterian Divine also from the West country.

The Collection contains items by both male (286 no.) and female (49 no.) writers. There are a remarkable number of women, some of whom have become obscure eg. Jane Marcet who wrote text books for children, considering that Chauncy collected in an age when masculine achievement was more noteworthy.

Introduction by Dr. Pamela Faithfull




1

ABERNETHY
FIRST NAME: John
DATES: 1763-1831
OCCUPATION: Eminent Surgeon
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Unknown
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Apprenticed at St Bartholomew’s hospital and became assistant surgeon there for 28 years. He became the founder of the medical school there. He attended the lectures of John Hunt who greatly influenced him. He became lecturer at the Royal College of Surgeons and was extremely popular. His private practice was very large. He was full surgeon at St. Bartholomew’s from 1815 to his retirement in 1827


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.1 (FILM 23: 1)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter dated 31.3.1801 Stained
CONTENTS:

Acknowledgement of a letter. The case with the divided artery mentioned in his last letter had done well. But he has done no further experiments on the theory of the subject. He had given his recipient’s memoir to the Medical Society but the language in which it was written precluded its insertion into their collection.



2

AGASSIZ
FIRST NAME: Louis John Rudolph
DATES: 1807-1873
OCCUPATION: Naturalist / Glaciologist
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Unknown
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Switzerland. Prof. of Natural History at Neuchâtel he became professor in the Scientific School in Harvard, USA from 1847-73. Founded their Museum of Comparative Zoology. He became a US citizen.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.2 (FILM 23:2)
FORMER REFERENCE: VI.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Note, draft in French, undated Good

CONTENTS:

Presently awaiting translation.

3

ALEXANDER
FIRST NAME: Alexander
DATES: 1818-1881
OCCUPATION: Emperor of Russia
NAME OF RECIPIENT: 1. Mlle. du Roveray
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Known as Alexander the Liberator, Tsar from 1855; signed the treaty of Paris which ended the Crimean War. His great achievement was the emancipation of the serfs in1861. Established an elected assembly in the provinces. His regime however was severely repressive and he was assassinated.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.3.1 (FILM 23:4)

3.2 (FILM 23:3)

3.3

FORMER REFERENCE: II.4


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 3
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION

1. Note in French, undated Good

2. Card, dated St. Petersburg 10.6.1859 Good

3. Cover for the above Good

CONTENTS:

1. Awaiting translation

2. States source of the autograph: Given by Prince Constantine Gortchakoff to C. Rumine

3. Inscribed in the hand of CHT “Autograph of the Emperor of Russia Alexander II.”



4

ALISON
FIRST NAME/S: Sir, Archibald
DATES: 1792-1867
OCCUPATION: Historian
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Unknown
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Educated at Edinburgh University and called to the bar in 1814. He had travelled abroad and continued to do so seeing everything he could. His professional income enabled him to accumulate a library. He published an extensive History of Europe in 20 volumes translated into several languages. He wrote frequently for “Blackwood’s” and the “Quarterly.”


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.4
FORMER REFERENCE: III.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Compliment slip, dated 25.7.1852 Good
CONTENTS:

Instructions for redirection



5

AMHERST
FIRST NAME/S: Jeffrey, Lord
DATES: 1717-1797
OCCUPATION: Colonel
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Mr. Dacosta
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

He served in the War of the Austrian Succession and in the early part of the Seven Years War. In 1758 he was sent to America as a major general to lead the Louisburg campaign in the last of the French and Indian Wars where he replaced James Abercromby as supreme commander. He arrived in Quebec too late to help Wolfe take the town. He however directed the capture of Montreal. He was Commander-in-chief of home defences during the American Revolution and later General in chief of the British Army 1778-1782. Bibliography: Journal, 1931. Biography, J. C. Long, 1933.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.5 (FILM 23: 5)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.3
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1

TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:



Letter: dated 1757 Good
CONTENTS:

Angry note for failure to send waggons to transport bread after repeated requests



6

ANDERSEN
FIRST NAME/S: Hans Christian
DATES: 1805-1875
OCCUPATION: Danish author
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Chas. Dickens
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Worked in a factory but soon displayed a talent for poetry. Published volumes in 1830 and 1831, the latter containing tales of fantasy which became famous throughout the world. He travelled in Britain and became a friend of Chas. Dickens.


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.6 (FILM 23: 6-7)
FORMER REFERENCE: III.2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter in English, dated: at Glorup in Funen, 16.7.1850 Good
CONTENTS

Short description of his summer visit to northern Sweden. He has been busy since and written two romantic comedies for the theatre which have proved very popular. He thanks Dickens for his “matchless” David Copperfield. He spent some time in May with the Danish poet Jugemann. He went to Jutland and is now on a visit to Count Moltke.



7

ANQUETIL-[Duperron]
FIRST NAME/S: Abraham, Hyacinth
DATES: 1731-1805?
OCCUPATION: French Historian / Orientalist
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Unknown
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

He gave up studying for the priesthood to pursue his deep interest in Eastern languages. In India (1755 - 61) he learned Persian, Sanskrit, Zend, Avestan and Pahlavi. After studying with the Parsis he was forced to return to France as a result of British conquests in India. He took with him 180 manuscripts which he gave to the Royal Library. His translation of the Zend-Avesta in 1771 introduced Zoroastrian texts to Europe. He also translated the Upanishads into Latin and wrote several works on India. Source: The Columbia Encyclopaedia 5th ed. 1994


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.7.1

7.2


FORMER REFERENCE: II.2
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S CONDITION:

1. Letter in French dated: Paris, 19.2.1805 ?08 Good

2. Catalogue clippings for sale, on 18.12.1846. Good

Includes an Anquetil letter. NOT the one in this collection.


CONTENTS:

1. Introduction of a M. Maussion

2. See above

8

ARNOLD
FIRST NAME/S: Thomas
DATES: 1795-1842
OCCUPATION: Headmaster of Rugby School
NAME OF RECIPIENT: C. H. Townshend
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE: Graduate of Oxford. Took deacons’ orders in 1818. Appointed to Rugby School in 1828. He reformed the school system, introduced sports and put an end to bullying. In 1841 he was appointed professor of modern history at Oxford.
REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.8
FORMER REFERENCE: V.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Note dated: 4.6.? Good, stained

CONTENTS:

Invitation to dinner.

9

BAILLIE
FIRST NAME/S: Joanna
DATES: 1762-1851
OCCUPATION: Scottish dramatist and poetess
NAME OF RECIPIENT: William Smyth
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

A friend and contemporary of Sir Walter Scott, her Plays on the Passions were published in 3 volumes, 1798, 1802, and 1812, some of which were successfully staged. Her verses, appreciated for their humour, were in Fugitive Verses (1790) and Metrical Legends (1821). A further volume of plays was published in 1836.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.9 (FILM 23: 8-9)
FORMER REFERENCE: IV.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter dated: Cavendish Square, Sat. 11.4.? Good, fading
CONTENTS:

Directions regarding the distribution of her ‘book for Cambridge’ and mistakes in the printed list of subscribers.



10

DE BALZAC
FIRST NAME/S: Honoré
DATES: 1799-1850
OCCUPATION: Novelist
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Illegible
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Studied at the Sorbonne. From 1819-1830 he lived a life of frequent privation and incessant industry which resulted in a burden of debt. He formed the idea of writing The Human Comedy - a complete picture of human civilisation. He then produced 85 novels in 20 years. In 1850 he married a Polish woman with whom he had corresponded for 15 years. He died 3 months later.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.10 (FILM 23: 10; FILM 24: 1)
FORMER REFERENCE: VI.2
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter in French dated: June 1823? Good, faded

CONTENTS:

Awaiting translation.

11

BARBER
FIRST NAME/S: Mary
DATES: 1690?-1757
OCCUPATION: Poetess, friend of Dean Swift
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Dean Swift
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Began writing poetry in order to enliven her children’s lessons. She wrote a poem about the needs of a poor widow and gained attention on her behalf and at the same time came to the attention of Swift. He gave her valuable introductions when she moved to England. In 1734 her Poems on Several Occasions was published with a preface from Swift. He gave her the manuscript of his Polite Conversations. It was published and presented as a play and secured her financial position.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.11
FORMER REFERENCE: I.1
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter dated: 16.11.1734 Stained, damaged

CONTENTS:

She relays to Swift the latest Court gossip that she has heard concerning Lady Suffolk who has displeased the King and left the Court despite the Queen’s interceding. Mr. Pope whom she has heard to be in good health could verify the details. She hopes Swift will visit her in Bath and she will do her best for him there to show the gratitude she owes him.

12

BARRINGTON
FIRST NAME/S: George
DATES: 1755-1804
OCCUPATION: Pickpocket and author
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Newspaper editor
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Educated by the charity of benefactors he became a habitual pickpocket and petty criminal. He fled from Ireland where he was born to England. On Sept. 15th 1790 he was sentenced at the Old Bailey on a charge of picking the pocket of Mr. Henry Hare Townsend and was sentenced to 7 years transportation to Botany Bay. There he obtained in 1792 the first warrant of emancipation ever issued. He acted in the first theatre ever opened there and run by convicts. He became superintendent of convicts and eventually became High Constable of Paramatta. Esteemed by the governor on account of his loyal conduct. He lived to a great age and wrote two books on early life in Australia.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.12.1 (FILM 24:2)

12.2


12.3

12.4
FORMER REFERENCE: II.2


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 4
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter dated: Margate, 31.10.1790 Good, stained

It is uncertain whether this is merely a draft of an intended letter and was in fact never sent.

2. 4 press cuttings Good

3. Portrait Good

4. Portrait Good

CONTENTS:

1. He writes to the editor of a newspaper wishing to correct the many false rumours concerning himself. He denies any thoughts of escape from custody and any attempts. Fiction is inexhaustible and rancour insatiable.

2. Describing arrest and court hearings

3. G. B. as he appeared at the bar of the Old Bailey

4. Detected picking the pocket of Prince Orlow in the front boxes of Covent Garden Theatre.


13

BARTHOLDY
FIRST NAME/S: Felix Mendelssohn
DATES: 1809-1847
OCCUPATION: Composer
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Sir William Sterndale Bennett
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Hamburg, he studied piano and composition in Berlin, making his first public appearance at the age of 9. Toured England and Scotland before founding an academy of arts in Berlin in 1841 and a music school in Leipzig in 1843.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.13 (FILM 24: 3)
FORMER REFERENCE: VI.3
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/ CONDITION:

Letter in German dated: Leipzig 22.2.1822 Good
CONTENTS:

About the return of some books.



14

BARTON
FIRST NAME/S: Bernard
DATES: 1784-1849
OCCUPATION: Poet
NAME OF RECIPIENT: 1. Cousin: Martha Alexander

2. Rev Charles Taylor, of Hadleigh

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Carlisle of a Quaker family, educated in Ipswich and lived for most of his life in Woodbridge, Suffolk where he worked in a bank. A successful popular poet of the time he had a lifelong friendship with Charles Lamb. His daughter married Edward Fitzgerald.


REFERENCE: WISFM.1942.12 (FILM 24: 4-5)

WISFM. 2003. 35.14


FORMER REFERENCE: VI.4; III.3
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION

1. Letter dated: Woodbridge, 20.6.1842 Good

Not the Townshend collection. Presented to the Wisbech and Fenland Museum by the

Honourable Alexandrina Peckover, 24.1.1942.

2. Letter dated: Woodbridge 14.6.1822 Good

CONTENTS:

1. The unexpected guest last night wished for a few autographs from him to be delivered by their uncle. He can’t think that his own name can be worth copying. He has set on the expedient of sending signed copies of one of his short poems. Does she think the one enclosed will be suitable?

2. He has seen the article by his friend in the Eclectic Review and congratulates him for it. Some of his remarks are obscure but obviously pertain to literary matters. He encourages his friend to attempt a story containing fictional characters who were Quakers. This he knows would please his family. He has sent a presentation copy of his own poetry to Carlton House. For which he has received thanks from the librarian.



15

BEAUVALLET
FIRST NAME/S: Jean
DATES:
OCCUPATION: Manager of the Theatre Français
NAME OF RECIPIENT:
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:
REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.15.1 (FILM 24: 6)

15.2


FORMER REFERENCE: VI.5
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter in French undated, written on headed note paper of the Good

Theatre Français.

2. Print mounted on card. Marked “Madame Caradore Allan” in pencil. Stained


CONTENTS:

1. Awaiting translation

2. Print: figure in costume, dancing

16

BECHER (née O’Neill)
FIRST NAME/S: Eliza, Lady
DATES: 1791-1872
OCCUPATION: Actress
NAME OF RECIPIENT: C. H. Townshend
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

First appeared as Juliet at Covent Garden in October 1814 was a success and for five years her career progressed without failures. On December 18th 1819 she made her last appearance. She married an Irish member of parliament, William Becher who possessed considerable estates. She never went on stage again. She was always considered the best since Mrs. Siddons.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.16.1a & b

16.2 (FILM 24: 7-8)

FORMER REFERENCE: V.2 & 3
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2 + envelope
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter dated: at London, 12.7.1860? Good

2. Letter dated: 14.6.1860 unsigned Fading

CONTENTS:

1. Invitation to CHT to visit.

2. Partly in verse. Thanking him for a copy of his poems.




17

BEETHOVEN
FIRST NAME/S: Ludwig, van
DATES: 1770-1827
OCCUPATION: Composer
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Collin (writer and friend)
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Studied and performed successfully becoming the main breadwinner of the family by the time he was 18. In 1787 he took lessons from Mozart in Vienna. In 1790 Haydn agreed to give him lessons and he moved to Vienna permanently. He performed in public there for the first time in 1795. His creative life is traditionally divided into 3 periods 1792-1802. During the second period till 1812 he went progressively deaf and suffered depression. During the 3rd period from 1812 onwards he composed less and his domestic life became increasingly chaotic. He continued to compose until the end of his life.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.17.1 (FILM 24: 9)

17.2
FORMER REFERENCE: I.3


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION

1. Letter undated Fading

Lot 81, Puttick and Simpson, March 1848. £1.15s

2. Two Press cuttings, mounted Good

CONTENTS:

1. Agrees to his friend’s desire to write an opera but doubts its acceptance by the Directional Board of Theatres whom he thinks do not favour him.

2. About the Townshend collection with a transcription of the letter


18

BENEDICT

FIRST NAME/S: Sir, Julius


DATES: 1804-1885
OCCUPATION: Musical Conductor
NAME OF RECIPIENT: C. H. Townshend
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born and educated in Stuttgart, he became a favourite pupil of Weber. He settled in England and became one of the great opera and oratorio conductors of his day. He toured America as accompanist and director for Jenny Lind.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.18.1

18.2a, b & c (FILM 24: 10; FILM 25: 1)

FORMER REFERENCE: III.4
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2+ envelope
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter dated: 8.4.1858 Good

2. Letter undated (2 Pages) Good

CONTENTS:

1. Thanks Townshend for an invitation to perform at a concert at his house.

2. Names the artists he has acquired for Townshend’s musical evening. He still lacks a tenor and suggests setting a later date. Assures CHT he will get him tickets for the Goldschmidt’s concert.




19

BENGER
FIRST NAME/S: Elizabeth Ogilvy
DATES: 1778-1827
OCCUPATION: Authoress
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Taylor and Hessey, publishers. On the reverse, in ink is a note: “Mr. Hessey, an early answer if you please.”
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Educated in a boys’ school so that she might learn Latin. At 22 she settled on her own in London in lodgings and persisted until she had worked her way into the Lamb’s literary circle. She also became acquainted with Smirke the painter, Jerdan, Miss Landon and the Porter sisters. Her poems appeared anonymously in the “Monthly Magazine”. She wrote two novels and taught herself German and translated a volume of letters. The rest of her life was devoted to a series of historical memoirs. She died at 49 still in straitened circumstances.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.19 (FILM 25: 2-3)
FORMER REFERENCE: V.4
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter undated Good

CONTENTS: Who is to publish the book by Sir Andrew Halliday MD?




20

BENSON
FIRST NAME/S: Arthur Christopher
DATES: 1862 - 1925
OCCUPATION: Essayist
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Miss Pate
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Eldest of 3 brothers who all wrote. He wrote the words of Land of Hope and Glory sung to the tune of Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance March.


REFERENCE: WISFM.1929.4
FORMER REFERENCE: V.5
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Note dated: 16.11.1923 on paper headed “The Master, Good

Magdalene College, Cambridge.”

Not CHT collection
CONTENTS:

Request to copy a sermon of the bishop of Ely.




21

BENTHAM
FIRST NAME/S: Jeremy
DATES: 1748-1832
OCCUPATION: Social Reformer
NAME OF RECIPIENT: “Citizen”?
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in London. Went up to Oxford at an early age and admitted to Lincoln’s Inn. Author and proponent of Utilitarianism. Made honorary citizen of the French Republic in 1792. Published copiously on penal and social reform. A founder of University College London.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.20.1 (FILM 25: 4-5)

20.2
FORMER REFERENCE: II.11 & 12


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter: dated 28.4.1824 Good

2. Letter: dated 29.3.1824 Good

CONTENTS:

1. Concerning Simond’s book on Switzerland.

2. Requesting papers; invitation to dinner.



22

DE BÉRANGER
FIRST NAME/S: Pierre-Jean
DATES: 1780-1857
OCCUPATION: Poet
NAME OF RECIPIENTS: 1. The Editor of “Pilote”

2. M. Laureauois


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Paris. His vivacious and satirical wit made him popular with the masses. Imprisoned twice for his Bonapartism.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.21.1

21.2 (FILM 25: 6)


FORMER REFERENCE: I.4
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Draft Letter: in French dated 14.9.1823 Stained

2. Letter: in French dated at Paris19.3.1845 Good

CONTENTS:

1. Awaiting transcription/translation

2. Ditto


23

BERESFORD
FIRST NAME/S: Charles, William, de la Poer, Lord
DATES: 1846-1919
OCCUPATION: British Admiral
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Mr. Wells
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Ireland. Entered the navy in 1859. A Lord of the Admiralty 1886-8. Commanded the Mediterranean fleet 1905-7 and the Channel Fleet 1907-9.


REFERENCE: WISFM.1930.23.2 (FILM 25: 7-8)
FORMER REFERENCE: V.6
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter dated: Portman Square, 13.10.1897 Good

Presented to the Wisbech & Fenland Museum by Miss K. E Wells

18.7.1930
CONTENTS: Thanks to Mr. Wells for sending him an as yet unpublished letter of Nelson. He requests permission to publish it in his forthcoming book.


24

BERNADOTTE
FIRST NAME/S: Jean-Baptiste
DATES: 1763-1844
OCCUPATION: King of Sweden, Charles XIV
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Madame la Baronne
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born a lawyer’s son in Pau, France. Became a Marshal of France in 1804. Fought in Napoleonic campaigns and was elected to the Swedish throne in 1810. Turning protestant he opposed Napoleon and was rewarded with the throne of Norway reuniting it with Sweden.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.22 (FILM 25: 9-10)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.9
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter in French, dated: at Stockholm, 12.7.1814 Good

CONTENTS:

Awaiting transcription/translation


25

BERNADOTTE
FIRST NAME/S: Joseph François
DATES: 1799 - 1859
OCCUPATION: Afterwards Oscar I, King of Sweden
NAME OF RECIPIENT: General Dupont
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Born in Paris. Succeeded his father to the Swedish throne in 1844. His reign was one of social and economic advance.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.23 (FILM 26: 1)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.10
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter in French, dated: 28.2.? Damaged
CONTENTS:

Awaiting transcription/translation




26

BETTY
FIRST NAME/S: William Henry West
DATES: 1791-1874
OCCUPATION: Child Actor
NAME OF RECIPIENT: W. Carpenter Esq.
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Known as the “Young Rosicus,” he first appeared on stage aged 11 at Belfast on 19th August 1803 and played successfully to a crowded house. He toured Ireland and Scotland with equal success and was on stage under Macready the elder in Birmingham a year later. He made his fortune drawing massive crowds in London. His final appearance as a boy actor was in 1808. He retired from the stage altogether at the age of 33 and freely acknowledged that his early admirers had been mistaken.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.24.1a & b

24.2


24.3

24.4


24.5

24.6


24.7

FORMER REFERENCE: V.7


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 6 + envelopes
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter dated 8.2.1843 + envelope Good

2. Slip of paper in envelope

3. Portrait dated March 1805 Good

4. Playbill Good

5. Slip of paper

6. Press cutting Good

7. Letter dated 4.7.1843 + envelope Good


CONTENTS:

1. Thanks Carpenter (probably the Keeper of Prints at the British Museum) for the distinguished honour the Committee has bestowed on him.

2. Paper with Betty’s signature.

3. Engraving by P. W .Tompkins of W. H. W. Betty and dedicated by him to Richard B. Sheridan Esq. MP.

4. For the Theatre Royal, Richmond. The Part of DOUGLAS by a young gentleman only thirteen years of age...

5. With verse by Cowper mentioning Betty.

6. With biographical details.

7. Refusal of Carpenter’s invitation to appear on the stage for one night only, in support of a Fund. No reason given.




27

BLACKWOOD
FIRST NAME/S: William
DATES: 1776-1834
OCCUPATION: Founder and publisher of Blackwood’s Magazine in Edinburgh
NAME OF RECIPIENT: C. H. Townshend
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Apprenticed to a bookseller in Edinburgh and then worked in London until 1817 when he returned to his native city. He began what was to become the famous “Blackwoods Monthly Magazine” in October 1817 as a rival publication to “The Edinburgh Review”. He remained its sole editor till his death.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.25.1 (FILM 26: 2)

25.2 (FILM 26: 3)

FORMER REFERENCE: V.8
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 2
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

1. Letter undated Good

2. Letter dated: 26.9.1829 Good

CONTENTS:

1. He encloses the numbers of the magazine in which are printed the concluding 2 books of CHT’s poem The Reigning Vice. He also encloses a draft which clears their account to CHT. He has no time at present to write about the 2 articles of his which they still hold.

2. He wants the article on Wordsworth confined to 4 parts. Nothing can be better fitted to the Magazine than his Essay on Prosing. The continuation of his poem will also be very acceptable.



28

BLOOMFIELD
FIRST NAME/S: Robert
DATES: 1766-1823
OCCUPATION: Poet
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Thomas Hill of Convent Garden
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Son of an agricultural labourer of Honington, Suffolk. His most famous poem “The Farmer’s Boy” was published in 1800.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.26 (FILM 26: 4-5)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.13
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

Letter with poem dated: 9.7.1800 Damaged

CONTENTS: Requests the poem be considered for publication.




29

BLUMENBACH
FIRST NAME/S: ? Johann Friedrich
DATES: ?1752-1840
OCCUPATION: Anthropologist
NAME OF RECIPIENT: ? Library request slips
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Presumably he is the person of this name who was born in Gotha, Germany and studied at Gottingen where he became professor of medicine in 1776. By his study of comparative skull measurements he established a quantitative basis for racial classification.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.27.1

27.2


27.3

FORMER REFERENCE: VI.6


NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 3
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:

3 Slips Good
CONTENTS:

Each slip has a title of a book, what might be a reference number and his signature.




30

BONAPARTE
FIRST NAME/S: Jerome
DATES: 1784-1860
OCCUPATION: Military Commander and King of Westphalia 1807-13
NAME OF RECIPIENT: Unknown
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:

Youngest brother of Napoleon. Given a high military command by Napoleon in the Prussian campaign. Fought at Waterloo and was exiled but returned to Paris in 1847. His nephew Napoleon III created him a marshal of France.


REFERENCE: WISFM 2003.35.28 (FILM 26: 10)
FORMER REFERENCE: II.6
NO. OF DOCUMENTS: 1
TYPE OF DOCUMENT/S: CONDITION:


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