Where are my little wolves?



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Date12.05.2017
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In Pat Mora’ essay “Remembering Lobo,” Mora describes her aunt, who she and her siblings affectionately called, “Lobo,” which means “wolf” in Spanish. Although the nickname predated the essay, Mora’s image of the “wolf” helps to clarify the dominant impression she wishes to make on the reader. The wolf brings two paradoxical images come to mind: the wolf pack and the lone wolf. Both images help to show different aspects of Lobo’s personality. The first image, the wolf pack, is developed from the beginning of the essay. Mora describes Lobo’s entering their home, calling out, “Where are my lobitos?” Where are my little wolves? This image is like that of the mother wolf surrounded by pups as she nurses and protects them. This idea is developed throughout the rest of the essay as Mora gives other examples of Lobo’s generosity and affection for her family. The other, seemingly contrary image of the wolf is the “lone wolf,” the animal that runs alone and makes his or her own rules in the world. Although Lobo seems extremely connected with her family, she also fits into this second “wolf” image in some ways. Mora’s examples show us a woman who speaks her mind and does what she wants. Mora refers to her as her “spinster aunt” and later reveals that Lobo never married, showing this independent spirit. Even on her death bed she made her own rules. She refused to conform to socially acceptable behavior and keep her voice down, but instead spoke her mind about her doctors’ incompetence. In conclusion, Pat Mora shows the reader Lobo’s unique personality by blending both aspects of the traditional image of the wolf.

In Pat Mora’ essay “Remembering Lobo,” Mora describes her aunt, who she and her siblings affectionately called, “Lobo,” which means “wolf” in Spanish. Although the nickname predated the essay, Mora’s image of the “wolf” helps to clarify the dominant impression she wishes to make on the reader. The wolf brings two paradoxical images come to mind: the wolf pack and the lone wolf. Both images help to show different aspects of Lobo’s personality. The first image, the wolf pack, is developed from the beginning of the essay. Mora describes Lobo’s entering their home, calling out, “Where are my lobitos?” Where are my little wolves? This image is like that of the mother wolf surrounded by pups as she nurses and protects them. This idea is developed throughout the rest of the essay as Mora gives other examples of Lobo’s generosity and affection for her family. The other, seemingly contrary image of the wolf is the “lone wolf,” the animal that runs alone and makes his or her own rules in the world. Although Lobo seems extremely connected with her family, she also fits into this second “wolf” image in some ways. Mora’s examples show us a woman who speaks her mind and does what she wants. Mora refers to her as her “spinster aunt” and later reveals that Lobo never married, showing this independent spirit. Even on her death bed she made her own rules. She refused to conform to socially acceptable behavior and keep her voice down, but instead spoke her mind about her doctors’ incompetence. In conclusion, Pat Mora shows the reader Lobo’s unique personality by blending both aspects of the traditional image of the wolf.

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