What are Thinking Maps & why do they work?



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  • Welcome to Thinking Maps®
  • What are Thinking Maps & why do they work?
  • What is the purpose of each map?
  • What is the Memorial High School Thinking Maps plan?
  • How will I use the Thinking Maps?
  • What support will I get throughout the year to help me learn Thinking Maps?
  • TODAY’S AGENDA
  • Initial Training
  • First Day Back
  • Faculty Meetings
  • Time Line
  • Advisory Class
  • Website
  • Parent Letter
  • Second Follow Up
  • 9th Week
  • Student Product Displays
  • Teacher Survey
  • Second Eight Weeks
  • 8 Weeks Thinking Maps with
  • Frame of Reference and Color
  • Department Student Product Display
  • Introductory Period
  • 8 Weeks
  • Introduction of each map in advisories
  • Student Product Displays
  • CWTs
  • Weekly Bulletin
  • Emails
  • First Follow Up
  • 9th Week
  • Student Products Displays
  • Faculty Meetings
  • School Wide Closure
  • Teacher Surveys
  • Student Surveys
  • End Products
  • Third Follow Up
  • Student Products
  • Faculty Meetings
  • RTI Connection
  • Third Eight Weeks
  • 8 Weeks
  • Thinking Map Extensions
  • “Off the Map”
  • Student Product Displays
  • CWTs
  • Purpose:
  • To use Thinking Maps as a “common visual language” in your learning community for transferring thinking processes, integrating learning, and for continuously assessing progress.

What are Thinking Maps?

  • Developed in 1988 by Dr. David Hyerle
  • Each map is based on a cognitive skill such as comparing and contrasting, sequencing, classifying, and cause-effect reasoning
  • Can be utilized individually or in various combinations to form a common visual language for students and teachers at all grade levels, in all subjects
  • Used to improve the basics of reading, writing, and mathematics as well as for problem solving and the development of higher order thinking skills

What is the Difference?

Eight Different Maps

  • What are Thinking Maps and how are they different from Graphic Organizers?
  • Use a Circle Map to define Thinking Maps.
  • 80% of all information that comes into our brain is VISUAL
  • 40% of all nerve fibers connected to the brain are linked to the retina
  • 36,000 visual messages per hour may be registered by the eyes.
  • -Eric Jensen, Brain Based Learning
  • OVERVIEW
  • The Thinking Maps give a concrete visual pattern for an abstract cognitive skill.
  • “Thinking Maps store information the way the brain does.”
  • Pat Wolfe
  • July 2005
  • Lost
  • Lost
  • Long
  • Term
  • Memory
  • Building
  • Networks
  • Networks Extended
  • How the Brain Processes Information
  • Senses Register Information
  • Areas in the Brain
  • Filter Information
  • Emotion
  • Meaning
  • Page 242
  • Dendrites
  • Cell Body
  • Axon
  • Synapse
  • NEURONS THAT FIRE TOGETHER
  • GET WIRED TOGETHER.
  • THAT IS WHAT A PATTERN IS!
  • Thought process: Sequencing
  • When do you use sequencing in:
  • READING?
  • SOCIAL STUDIES?
  • SCIENCE?
  • MATH?
  • In every instance, you could use a
  • WRITING?
  • FLOW MAP
  • THE ARTS?
  • Middle School Social Studies
  • High School English
  • TEACHER / STUDENT INPUT
  • SET
  • PROCESSING
  • EXTENSION
  • CLOSURE
  • First Thinking Map
  • The Circle Map

Circle Map

  • Thinking Process: Defining in Context
  • Key Question: How are you defining this thing or idea?
  • Key Words and Phrases: List, define, tell everything you know, brainstorm, identify, relate prior knowledge, describe, explore the meaning
  • Design: the topic is in the middle, smaller circle. Everything you know about the topic is in the larger circle. A box, that may be included, around the entire map is a “Frame of Reference” that is used to answer the question “How did I learn this?” (The frame of reference can be used around any of the maps
  • Common Uses: Brainstorm for writing, used as a starting point during the prewriting stage, defining words, identifying audience and author’s point of view
  • Writing Mode: Point of View Essay
  • The Circle Map
  • Defining in Context
  • ?
  • sideburns
  • scarves
  • Cadillac
  • May still be alive
  • Abolitionist
  • Physical Change
  • Definition (in own words)
  • Characteristics
  • Examples
  • A change in size, shape, or state of matter
  • New materials are NOT formed
  • Ice melting
  • Breaking a glass
  • Cutting hair
  • Same matter present before and after change
  • Definition
  • Visual Representation
  • Personal Association or Characteristic
  • Triangle
  • with a 90
  • degree angle
  • Right
  • Triangle
  • Second Thinking Map
  • The Bubble Map

Bubble Map

  • Thinking Process: Describing Qualities; Characterization
  • Key Question: How are you describing this thing? What adjectives best describe it?
  • Key Words and Phrases: Describe, use vivid language, describe feelings, observe using the five senses
  • Design: The topic being described is in the center bubble. The outer bubbles contain adjectives and adjective phrases describing the topic.
  • Common Uses: Describing things, identifying qualities, character traits, attributes and/or properties of things. The Bubble Map is a tool for enriching students’ abilities to identify qualities and use descriptive words.
  • Writing Mode: Descriptive Writing
  • The Bubble Map
  • Describing
  • Science
  • Second Thinking Map
  • The Double Bubble Map

Double Bubble

  • Thinking Process: Comparing and Contrasting
  • Key Question: What are the similar and different qualities of these things?
  • Key Words and Phrases: Compare/contrast, discuss similarities and differences, prioritize essential characteristics, distinguish between, differentiate
  • Design: In the center circles are the words for the two things being compared and contrasted. In the middle bubbles, use terms to show similarities. In the outside bubbles, describe the differences. If there are too many similarities or differences, students should prioritize and keep only the most important.
  • Common Uses: A tool for comparing and contrasting two things.
  • Writing Mode: Comparison Essay
  • The Double Bubble Map
  • Comparing and Contrasting

Comparing enhances meaning

  • The square root function
  • A parabola

Useful Websites

  • Presentation created and modified using the following resources.
  • Examples of each map grades K-6
  • http://fdlrs.brevard.k12.fl.us/ThinkingMaps/default.html
  • Newsletters devoted to each Thinking Map
  • http://www.kcclc.org/thinkingmaps2?print-friendly=true
  • Chippewa Valley ELA Website
  • http://chippewavalleyela.pbworks.com


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