What are the Graduation Standards?



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Instructions:



  1. Please circle the number that represents the student’s performance for each item. To PASS, the total score must be greater than or equal to a score of 13 AND no scores of “1” and not more than two scores of “2.”

  2. Essays PASS immediately (i.e., will not require a second reader) if:

    1. The total score is greater than or equal to 15 and the essay receives no 1’s.

    2. All items receive scores of 3 or 4.

  3. Essays receiving a score of 10 to 14 will need to be read by a second reader (see FAQ for details.)

  4. Essays will FAIL immediately (i.e., will not require a second reader) if: the total score is 9 or less OR if two or more items receive a score of 1.



Student name: ____________________________________________ Student ID #: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________ Course #: ____________________
Instructor name: __________________________________________ PASS / FAIL (circle one) revised 9–8-08

The Information Literacy Standard

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 


  1. THE ASSESSMENT


How do students meet the graduation standard in information literacy?

During their third or fourth year, students will identify a course with a scholarly research-project component (research paper, scholarly presentation citing sources, etc.) preferably within their program. The research project will serve as the assessment. If a course in their program is not available the project may be in an elective course. Other options are available if students find themselves in unusual circumstances.



Who initiates the assessment – students or faculty member?

Students are responsible for initiating the assessment. A student should ask their instructor to assess their scholarly research project based on the information literacy grading rubric.




  1. SCORING


How is the project scored?

The assessment is scored using the rubric, which is available on the portal and re-printed on the next page. The instructor will report scores to the registrar using the form available on the portal. Projects or presentations are awarded 1 to 4 points for each part of the information literacy standard (no half points may be used in scoring.) The sum of the five sections yields the student’s score. Scoring guidelines are at the top of the rubric.




  1. PREPARATION & REMEDIATION



How can students prepare for the assessment?

We encourage students to use the information literacy rubric when preparing all research projects and particularly the one they will present for assessment. Reviewing the TILT Tutorial (available on the LSC Library website) will familiarize students with basic information literacy concepts.


 

What happens if a student fails the assessment?

  • The instructor has the discretion to allow revision of the failing project or the creation of a new project paper.

  • The student may test twice. Before further retesting, a student must engage in some remedial activity.

  • Remedial activities include going over test results with the Library Director or Coordinator of Library Access Services; review of the TILT tutorial with associated quizzes (requires setup by library); and taking an information literacy workshop through Academic Support.

Information Literacy Standard Evaluation Form

Instructions: Please check the number of points that best represents the student’s performance for each item.

To PASS, the total score must be greater than or equal to a total score of 37 AND no scores of “1” and not more than two scores of “2”


I. Define a research topic and the information needed: Points

•The project accurately states the research question __1 __2 __3 __4

•There is evidence of an appropriate (per discipline) literature review __1 __2 __3 __4

•The project synthesizes appropriate sources relating to the research question __1 __2 __3 __4

•The project exhibits an in-depth understanding of the topic and research process __1 __2 __3 __4

II. Collect and organize information using a variety of sources:

•Student demonstrates the ability to formulate an appropriate research strategy __1 __2 __3 __4

•Student uses a variety of information sources and formats __1 __2 __3 __4

•The project demonstrates a sufficient review of relevant sources __1 __2 __3 __4



III. Critically evaluate information and sources:

•Information sources used are appropriate for the topic __1 __2 __3 __4

•The project addresses relevant perspectives on the topic __1 __2 __3 __4

•There is evidence that information sources cited are authoritative __1 __2 __3 __4



IV. Acknowledge and document research sources:

•The project clearly demonstrates the ability to differentiate between the author’s ideas and those of others __1 __2 __3 __4

•Sources are cited properly and legally using appropriate documentation style __1 __2 __3 __4

•The project is consistently formatted, properly adhering to appropriate style (APA, MLA, etc.) __1 __2 __3 __4


Student’s Name and ID: ________________________________________________________ Total Points:_____________

Instructor’s name (Print and sign): ________________________________________________________ PASS / FAIL (circle one)

Course Name, Number, and Section:____________________________________________________________________________________

9–12-08

The Quantitative Reasoning Standard
Frequently Asked Questions
I. THE ASSESSMENT
How do students meet the graduation standard in quantitative reasoning?

There are several means to complete this graduation standard depending on the student’s major. For most majors students complete an in-class assessment in a course in their major, most often in the junior year. Students who are Education majors satisfy this requirement by passing the Quantitative section of the Praxis I exam. (Students in other majors are also free to use the Praxis I exam to satisfy this requirement.) Students in Mathematics & Computer Science satisfy the assessment through their portfolio.


Can assignments, problems, or other material be given to students in advance of the assessment?

Yes. Quantitative reasoning needs to be practiced in many situations if the student is going to meet the standard. Many classes provide opportunities for students to combine subject area reasoning and quantitative skills. Students may be given assignments using the same format as the assessment so they will be familiar with the style of questions and expected responses. Students need to be encouraged to think about the reasoning process as well as the end result. They may not do well on the assessment without understanding the rubric.


Can the actual assessment questions be given in advance?

No.
Can the assessment be a part of an existing exam?

Yes. This assessment should be considered to be an integral part of the course and not an add-

on.
If the student is not submitting a portfolio, must the assessment be proctored?

Yes.
II. SCORING
How is the assessment scored?

The assessment is scored using the rubric, which is available on the portal and re-printed here. Assessments are awarded 1 to 4 points for each part of the information literacy standard (no half points may be used in scoring.) The sum of the four sections yields the student’s score. The scoring guidelines are at the bottom of the rubric.


How are scores reported?

Instructors of courses in which the quantitative reasoning standard assessment is embedded will report pass/fail scores to the registrar using Web Services.


III. PREPARATION & REMEDIATION
How can students prepare for the assessment?

Students who will not be taking an in-class assessment or the Praxis should take MAT 1060 Problem Solving. There are also sample questions in the Quantitative Reasoning section on the portal site.


What if a student fails the assessment?

  • The instructor has the discretion to allow:

    • a retake of the course-based assessment

    • an alternative course-based assessment




  • The student may take the online quantitative reasoning test administered

during the fall and spring semesters if all other options are unavailable.


  • The student may test twice. Before further re-testing, a student must engage in some remedial activity.




  • Remedial activities include:




    • Working with the Developmental Math Coordinator;

    • Enrolling in a quantitative reasoning mini course;

    • Taking a quantitative reasoning workshop through Academic Support;

    • Retaking (or auditing) MAT 1060:

    • Discussing possible accommodations with Academic Support (in cases of a learning disability).

After successful completion of remedial activities, the student may re-test.



Quantitative Reasoning Standard Evaluation Form




1

2

3

4


#1 Select and perform appropriate procedures to solve mathematical problems arising in various disciplines.

1

Procedures and performance are not appropriate and not performed correctly.



2

Procedure is inappropriate though performed correctly; it is not clear that the problem was understood.



3

Selection of procedures is appropriate and shows understanding of the problem, but procedures are not performed correctly or logic of selection is not clear.



4

Logic of selection and selection are both appropriate and show understanding of the problem. Procedures are performed correctly and lead to a correct solution.




#2 Interpret quantitative information accurately.

1

Quantitative information is not interpreted.



2

Quantitative information is not accurately interpreted or interpretation leads to unreasonable conclusions.



3

Quantitative information is interpreted accurately but no relevant conclusions are drawn or applied.



4

Quantitative information is interpreted accurately and relevance of interpretation is clear. Reasonable conclusions are stated based on the information.




#3 Present quantitative information effectively.

1

Presentation of quantitative information is unclear and misrepresents data.



2

Presentation of information is clear but inaccurate and does not communicate relevance.



3

Presentation of quantitative information is clear and accurate but does not clearly communicate relevance.



4

Presentation of quantitative information is clear and accurate, and effectively indicates relevance of information.



#4 Evaluate the reasonableness of quantitative conclusions.


1

Fails to use quantitative logic to evaluate conclusions.



2

Inaccurately evaluates conclusions using quantitative logic.



3

Accurately but not completely evaluates conclusions using quantitative logic



4

Accurately and completely evaluates reasonableness of conclusions using quantitative logic.




Instructions: Please circle the number that represents the student’s performance for each item.

To PASS, the total score must be greater than or equal to 12 and all items must receive a score of 3 or 4.

Student name: ____________________________________________ Student ID #: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________ Course #: ____________________
Instructor name: __________________________________________ PASS / FAIL (circle one) 10/29/08

The Oral Communications Standard

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 


  1. THE ASSESSMENT


How do students meet the graduation standard in oral communication?

To meet the oral communication standard, students must be assessed twice, most often in the junior year. Most typically, the student will be assessed in two separate courses by two separate instructors. Occasionally, a student may be evaluated by two instructors for the same presentation. To complete this standard, the student must receive two passing scores on the presentation(s). A third option for assessment is a student’s presentation to a campus group about a field experience as long as there is an instructor and an audience present.

 

Who initiates the assessment – the student or the faculty member?

Unlike the standards for writing or quantitative reasoning, in which a specific course in a major is identified as the location for the assessment, the oral communication standard can be assessed by any instructor in any class where an oral presentation is required. Students should ask the instructor to evaluate him/her for this standard. Unlike the other standards, most faculty members will have the opportunity to assess students.


Can the presentation be a part of an existing assignment?

Yes. Such an assessment could be an integral part of the course, and not an add-on. For example, a student could be assessed in any course where an oral presentation is routinely required in the course.


However, in the interest of giving students options to complete this standard, a student could request an opportunity to make an oral presentation in a class where a presentation is not required, but such a presentation would need to fit with the instructional purpose of the class.

 

Does the presentation have to be done in class?

No, but there needs to be an audience and an evaluating instructor. For example, a student’s presentation to a campus group about a field experience could be assessed as long as there is an instructor and an audience present.

 

How long is the presentation?

The student should be making a presentation that is a minimum of five minutes in length.

  

What are the logistics of initiating an assessment – and what must the instructor do?

The student needs to make this request before the class; that is, the student should not come to class and ask to be evaluated that day in that class. An instructor can require that a student make a request 48 hours in advance.
Given that a student will make a request in advance, the instructor needs to download the evaluation form from the portal to use in class to grade the presentation. The evaluation form is also printed in this booklet.

 
Can an instructor give students the rubric in advance?

Yes, we encourage instructors to do so. Students will find it helpful to see this rubric in many courses, and to have it used as an evaluation tool for other oral assignments.
Can the student use audio-visual aids and other tools?

Yes. Students routinely use PowerPoint and other materials when they give a presentation. We expect that students will use the tools and materials they would normally use.

 


  1. SCORING


How is the assessment scored?

The presentation is scored by the faculty who observe the presentation, using the evaluation form which is available on the portal. The student should provide that form to each evaluating faculty ahead of time. Each part of the standard is awarded 1 to 4 points. Every student must pass (a score of 3 or 4) on Parts I and II. The student can only receive one score of 2 on Parts III through VII. A student fails if s/he receives a score of 1 on any part of the evaluation. No ½ points may be used in scoring.

 

How are scores reported?

The instructor should use the evaluation form provided in this booklet. The evaluation forms are also available on the portal in the Graduation Standards organization (Go to the button on the left side labeled “FORMS”). The form looks very much like the grading rubric. On it, the instructor will record whether the student passed or failed. The instructor should send the completed form to the registrar. The result will be posted on the student’s file in Colleague. The hard copy of the form will be retained in the student’s file in the registrar’s office.




  1. PREPARATION & REMEDIATION


How can students prepare for the assessment?

Students can prepare for the assessment by practicing good presentation techniques in all their courses or by enrolling in Expository Speaking.


What happens if a student fails the assessment?

 If a student fails the assessment, the evaluating instructor should:



  • Sit down with the student and explain how the presentation fell short, using the rubric.

  • Counsel the student to talk to Academic Support or their advisor about ways to work on their speaking.

  • Suggest the student enroll in Expository Speaking.

  

 Oral Communications Standard Evaluation Form

Low ……………………High

I. Clarity of Purpose: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

Understands point of presentation

Aware of the rhetorical situation

Presentation is convincing

II. Overall organization: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

Shape and structure clear

Transitions present and clear

Presentation is cohesive

III. Supporting evidence: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

References are evident

References used appropriately

References are appropriate to topic

IV. Language & Syntax: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

Uses language appropriate to topic

Uses terms correctly and in context

Uses no colloquialisms or street language

V. Delivery: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

Smooth presentation with no dysfluencies

Speaks clearly and loudly

Appears confident

VI. Audience Engagement: ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4

Does not read from notes or paper

Makes Eye Contact

Responds to audience's reactions/needs

___________________________________________________________________

 

VII. Use of Supportive Technology or Materials (optional) ____1 ____2 ____3 ____4



Materials enhance presentation

Materials are appropriate to topic

Materials are professional & well-planned

 

Note: In order to successfully pass the Oral Competency Graduation Standard students must pass both Category I and II, and can only receive one “2” (fail) in any other category, including VII (if and when supports are used.) A score of “1” in any category is an automatic fail for this assessment. Passing grades for each category are either “3” or “4”.



 

Student name: _______________________Student ID #: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________

 

Course #: ____________________ Instructor name: __________________________



 

PASS / FAIL (circle one)



(Revised 2-5-09)

Appendix A

Courses in which Graduation Standards can be assessed for Bachelor’s Degree Students

DEGREE

PROGRAM 

Writing

Quantitative Reasoning

Information

Literacy

ORAL

COMMUNICATION1

Animation/Illustration

ARH 2011 or

ARH 2012


ART 2070

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Atmospheric Sciences

ATM-2020

ATM 4712




ATM 3140

ATM 4712

ATM 3332

ATM 4712


Business

BUS 3250

BUS 3360


BUS 3230

BUS 4260


Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Online Business Program

BUS 3250

BUS 3230

BUS 3150

BUS 4060

Cinema Production

FLM 3010 or

FLM3610


VID3060

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

CIS

CIS 4990

CIS 4990

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Design

ARH 2011

ARH 2012

DES 3111 or

DES 3112


Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Education

EDU 3315 & EDU 3325


Quantitative Reasoning: Independently arranged

EDU 3540 & EDU 3325


EDU 3540

Electronic Journalism Arts

EJA 3030

EJA 2050

EJA 4850


EJA 3030

EJA 4020


EJA 4020

EJA 4851 or

Oral presentation w/in any course


English

ENG 2020*

ENG 3010


ENG 3010

Or

See department chair*



Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation**

Oral presentation w/in any course

Exercise Science

XSC 4071


XSC 3120

XSC 4072

XSC 3150, 4071 or 4072, or any other 3000 or 4000 level XSC course with an oral presentation

Human Services

PSY 2812

PSY 2411

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Liberal Studies

See Liberal Studies Coordinator

See Liberal Studies Coordinator

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Mathematics

MAT 4990

CIS3050 Algorithms and Data Structures

CIS4120 System Analysis and Design

Oral presentation w/in any course

Mountain Recreation Management

MRM 4740

MRM 2120

MRM 4740


MRM 4740

MRM 3050, MRM 3110, or oral presentation w/in any course

MBI

MUS 3350

MUS 3330


MBI 4720

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Natural Sciences

(including Env.Sci. & Sustainability)



BIO 4040

GEY 2112

PHY 2032


BIO 4040

GEY 3110


PHY 2032

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Psychology

PSY 2812

PSY 2411

Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course

Social Sciences

(including Crim Justice)



SSC 4740

SSC 3020

SSC 4720

SSC 4720

Visual Communications

ARH 2011 or

ARH 2012


DES 3111 or

DES 3112


Any course w/a written or oral research paper or presentation

Oral presentation w/in any course



 In addition to assessments completed within a course, an alternative option for assessment is a student’s presentation to a campus group about a field experience as long as there is an instructor and an audience present.
*For students under Catalog requirements prior to 2009-10 (English majors.)

**A research analysis is required in ENG2250 which is an option for English majors to meet the Information Literacy Standard.



Appendix B

Graduation Standards Assessments for Associate Degree Students


DEGREE

Writing2

Quantitative Reasoning

Information

Literacy

ORAL

COMMUNICATION3

A.A. and A.S.

ENG 1052

MAT 1060 or

MAT 2021 or

ACC 2122 or


ENG 1052

Oral presentation w/in any course

A.A.S.

ENG 1052

MAT 1111 or

ENG 1052

Oral presentation w/in any course


Appendix C
Graduation Standards Alternative Assessment Application
This form must be completed and signed by your advisor or the department chair of your major in order for you to be eligible to take an alternative assessment for the Information Literacy, Quantitative Reasoning or Writing Standards. You must complete separate applications for each assessment.
To be completed by the Student
Name: Date:

 

Standard (select one):



Information Literacy

Quantitative Reasoning

Writing

 

What is your major?



 

Class standing?


a. Freshman b. Sophomore c. Junior d. Senior

 

When do you plan to graduate? (Date)



 

Degree? (A.S., A.A., A.A.S., B.A., B.S., B.F.A.)

 

Why are you unable to complete an assessment within your major? (Explain)



 

 How many times have you tested for this graduation standard?

 

 

What have you done to prepare for this test?



 

  

To be completed by Advisor or Department Chair

 

Why is this student unable to be assessed within their department/major?



 

  

Name: Date:________________



1


2 The Writing, Information Literacy, and Quantitative Reasoning standards are satisfied if the student receives a final grade of C- or better in the course listed above.

3 In addition to assessments completed within a course, an alternative option for assessment is a student’s presentation to a campus group about a field experience as long as there is an instructor and an audience present.



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