Welcome Message – Dr. Harter


COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS COLLABORATIVE



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COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS COLLABORATIVE


Request for Professional Development or Expenditure Approval

Please check one: ___Study Trip (personnel costs) ___Professional Development ___Expenditure ___Other

Revised March 12, 2013



For the expenditure(s) described below, our academy requests funding support.

This expenditure request needs to be:

  1. Completed by academy lead/designee

  2. Recommended by the site principal (electronic approval is satisfactory)

  3. Submitted electronically to Delmy Cornejo

This form should either precede or accompany any study trip request packet (which should also be submitted to Delmy Cornejo)

Upon electronic receipt, the CCRC Office will notify you electronically.

For PD, remit approved agenda, sign-in/out sheets and time cards to the CCRC Office.

WHO:

School/Academy Name(s):

Staff in Attendance or Staff Impacted by the Expenditure:

Section 1

WHEN:

Day(s)/Date(s) of meeting (if applicable):

Hours per person requested:

Section 2

WHERE:

Location of activity:

Section 3

WHAT:
Title of Staff Development/Expenditure Item/Event:

Section 4

HOW:

For study trips, give the destination, the number of students, the number of adults/substitutes requested, the date, admission cost per participant, transportation cost, total cost for the study trip, and expected outcomes for attendees.(complete Sections 1-7)

For PD/conferences, please attach formal agenda.(complete Sections 1-8)

For materials/supplies, travel/conference or a study trip, list the objectives and give a detailed description of your request

For supplies, list the per item cost, the number of items requested, shipping costs, applicable taxes, total request cost, and vendor’s information. (complete Sections 1-7)

For travel/conference, give the name, location, date, contact person’s information, estimated cost per participant including mileage, transportation, lodging, subsistence, plus the expected outcomes for attendees. (complete Sections 1-8)

Section 5

WHY/Justification for expense:

Alignment outcomes of the Academy Graduate Profile


Section 6




Alignment outcomes of the WCCUSD Graduate Profile


Graduate Profile

West Contra Costa Unified School District

The WCCUSD Graduate is a(n):

___Self-Directed Learner: Independently seeks and uses resources including teachers, peers, print and digital references to engage

in new learning toward academic, professional, and personal goals.


___SkilledCommunicator: Listens, comprehends, critiques, and communicates effectively by adapting to audience, task, purpose,

and discipline. Refines and applies core content knowledge through speaking and writing.


___Effective Collaborator: Works in teams to share ideas and responsibilities, solve problems, and achieve shared goals.

___Innovative Thinker: Thinks critically and creatively by making claims, assessing evidence and solutions and draws on multiple

perspectives when approaching complex issues and adapting to challenges.



___Quality Producer: Consistently produces high quality academic and professional products and performances that

Model reflection and revision, persistence and accountability.


___Responsible World Citizen: Exercises the rights and obligations of citizenship, engages in the local and global community

through application of content knowledge and cultural awareness. Seeks to understand other perspectives.


___Proficient User of Digital Media and Technology: Ethically and thoughtfully employs digital media and technology to analyze,

organize and process content to create quality products and performances.


___Health & Wellness Advocate: Demonstrates a commitment to the physical and mental health of self and others through

interpretation and application of a wide range of health information and practices.


(Draft 1/22/2013)

Section 7

Alignment to CCRC Goals (identified by number/s)

2012-2013 Areas of Focus for College & Career Readiness Collaborative:

(mark/highlight appropriate outcomes)

___ 1. Implement Pathway Quality Assessment System

___ 2. Build Distributive Leadership Capacity & Communication Systems

___ 3. Improve Secondary Instruction in Preparation for the Common Core State Standards & Beyond

___ 4. Develop Pathway Marketing Systems


Section 8

Submitted by (Academy Lead/Designee)




Position




Funding Source/Account #




Principal Recommendation via E-mail




Date Submitted




Please complete and return this form to Delmy Cornejo (dcornejo@wccusd.net) for processing. (revised 12 March 2013)

Section IV – Key Contact Information

Mike Aaronian CCRC maaronian@wccusd.net

Delmy Cornejo CCRC dcornejo@wccusd.net

Janet Haun ROP jhaun@cccoe.k12.ca.us

Cookie Teat ROP cteat@cccoe.k12.ca.us

Carmel Aguilar Budgets caguilar@wccusd.net

Mary Kitchen Bi-Tech mkitchen@wccusd.net

Patricia Clark CCASN patricia510@gmail.com

Kathy Harris ConnectEd kharris@connectedcalifornia.org

Dave Yanofsky ConnectEd dyanofsky@connectedcalifornia.org

Jerry Winthrop CDE jwinthrop@cde.ca.gov

Sasha Kirkman CCRC skirkman@wccusd.net

Ben Crosby CCRC bcrosby@wccusd.net

Section V – Calendars and Timelines

California Partnership Academy Timeline

*See Page 18 for Annual CPA Timeline

2012-2013 Lead Teacher Professional Development Calendar



*Locations vary, but will be communicated to lead teachers by the CCRC staff

  • September 13

  • October 18

  • November 15

  • December 13

  • January 24

  • February 28

  • March 28

  • April 18

  • May 2

  • June TBA

WCCUSD Academic Calendar 2012-13


New Teacher Orientation

August 15







Staff Development

August 16







Teacher Workday

August 17







First Day of School (Minimum Day)

August 20







Terence Martin Day (Memorial Day) (School is in Session)

August 23







Labor Day (District Holiday)

September 3







Back To School Night - Elementary (Minimum Day, Elementary Schools)

September 13







Back To School Night - Middle Schools (Minimum Day, Middle Schools)

September 20







Back To School Night - High Schools (Minimum Day, High Schools)

September 27







Classified Training Day & Staff Development (No School)

October 12







End of 1st Quarter

October 26







Minimum Day – Middle and High School (Mark Report Cards)

October 29







Minimum Day – Elementary and Middle Schools

October 31







Elementary Conference Day (No School, Elementary Students Only)

November 6







Elementary Parent Conferences (Minimum Days, Elementary Schools)

November 5,7,8,9







End of Trimester 1

November 8







Veterans' Day Holiday (District Holiday)

November 12







Minimum Day, All Schools

November 21







Thanksgiving Holidays (District Holidays)

November 22-23







Minimum Day, All Schools

December 14







Winter Recess (No School)

December 17- January 1







District Holidays

Dec. 24, 25, January 1







Classes Reconvene After Recess

January 2







End of 2nd Quarter

January 18







Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (District Holiday)

January 21







Secondary Work Day (No School, Middle & High School Students Only)

January 22







Presidents' Week Recess (No School)

February 18-22







End of Trimester 2

March 1







Open House – Elementary Schools (Minimum Day, Elementary Schools)

March 7







Open House – Middle Schools (Minimum Day, Middle schools)

March 14







Open House – High Schools (Minimum Day, High schools)

March 21







Minimum Day – Middle and High School (Mark Report Cards)

March 29







End of 3rd Quarter

March 29







Spring Recess (No School)

April 1-5







District Holiday

April 1







Memorial Day (District Holiday)

May 27







Last Day of School (noon dismissal)

June 7







Section VI – Budgets

CPA Lead Teachers oversee their Academy Budget. Budgets, PRs, and POs are monitored and created in the District Bi-Tech system. Lead Teachers can be granted access to Bi-Tech by contacting Mike Aaronian. There is also training opportunities for lead teachers to learn how to navigate the Bi-Tech system, contact Mike Aaronian for more information.

Budget information is part of the Letter of Intent completed at the end of each school year, AND the End of Project report due August 31st.

For CPA programs, there are clear guidelines:

*No more than 40 percent should be allocated for personnel costs (line items 1000, 2000, and 3000 inclusive)

*No more than 25 percent should be allocated for technology.

*Field trips should be instructional in nature and tied to the career area of the academy



Planning Your Budget:

 Evaluate the progress of the Academy each year. Use the CPA funds for time to

evaluate for program improvement.
 Include input from your Advisory Committee when developing the Academy’s

budget for the upcoming year. Carefully plan expenditures of the grant funds, as

well as the district and business partner matches for the success of the Academy

and the students.


 The CPA grant funds are supplemental in nature, use these funds for

activities/items over and above what is offered at the school site as part of every

student’s standard curriculum.
 Make sure that your budget forms are completed thoroughly and accurately and

that the narrative portion is included with enough detail to show a good picture of

planned expenditures.
 Make sure the budget includes the appropriate signatures from the principal and

the district business manager.

*Be careful NOT to supplant activities or items, such as:


    • Annual allocated classroom supplies for ALL school classrooms

    • Standard classroom textbooks

    • Teaching salaries

Budget Categories

CPA budgets are organized around the types of funds. Below is a brief summary of the budget classifications:

1000 Certificated Personnel Salaries (District) or Partner Time (Bus.)

2000 Classified Personnel Salaries

3000 Employee Benefits

4000 Books and Supplies

5000 Services and Other Operating Expenses/Travel and Conferences

6000 Capital Outlay (Refer to District for capital outlay dollar threshold)

7000 Indirect Rate (CDE approved rates apply. Visit CDE Web site at: http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/ac/ic)

Sample CPA Budget Narrative

*A complete CPA budget includes the budget form and the budget narrative. The narrative explains the numbers shown on the budget form. Carmel Aguilar (caguilar@wccusd.net; ext. 11138) in the Fiscal Department will support you with getting accurate budget numbers. The sample below is a BUDGET NARRATIVE, which is completed by each Academy Lead Teacher.



EXAMPLES ONLY: The descriptions and line items may or may not apply to your specific CPA program. This example pertains to a Biotechnology Academy


Object Code

CPA GRANT FUNDS NARRATIVE

DISTRICT MATCH NARRATIVE

BUSINESS MATCH NARRATIVE

1000

$4,000 = Extra time for curriculum development

$1,082 substitute time

$10,000 = 1/6 coordinator time to plan, coordinate, & oversee academy components/activities

$18,285 = Class size reduction costs

$2,640 = Subs for planning time

$4,000 = 8 days site administration support above normal responsibilities

$4,000 = After school Tutoring Program



$4,775 = Estimated value of advisory committee meetings

$20,000 = Estimated value of classroom speakers

$11,000 = Estimated value of mentor coordination

$18,000 = Estimated value of partners’ time in job shadowing coordination/ activities

2000

$3,300 Part-time secretary: 20 weeks, provides general support







3000

Certificated Benefits (approx.): Certificated time @ 25% = $3,500

Classified Benefits:

Part-time secretary @ 8% =$825


$8,750 = 25% benefits for above costs




4000

$9,750 = Anatomical models for Health studies; DNA lab and teaching activity lab

$5,000 = 2 laptops @ $1,250; 1 laser printer @ $2,500


$6,500 = Supplemental CTE textbooks for the health class & health-oriented literature books for English

$4,000 = Computer software for academy

$1,000 = award certificates/pins

$3,500 = Printing costs for marketing material, i.e. brochures/presentations and parent correspondence

$1,750 = Uniform shirts

$1,750 = Academy promotional items, such as cups, pens, health-related items, and plaques

$6,000 = Donated computers/software

$5,500 = Donated Bio Rhythm machine

5000

Example: (Travel & Conf.):

$550 = Site Coordinator to attend HS Regional Support Workshop

$3,500 = 3 academy staff to attend annual conference, March 2008

$20,755 = Field Trips for:

10th- [trips w/location/description]*

11th- [trips w/location/description]* 12th- [trips w/location/description]*

Example (Subcontract Info):



$5,000 = 2 trainers to provide 15 days of research-based, health tech. training

$500 = facility rental cost for advisory meeting

$3,000 = Van/bus transportation for field trips

$4,000 = Travel/conference costs for academy staff to attend professional development activities

$3,250 = Rental costs for academy recognition activities

$10,000 = Rental costs of facility for academy staff professional development activities and student events ceremonies

$2,225 = food for student events/ceremonies


6000

$12,460 = Cost of DNA Separator (includes filtering equipment for chemical lab)

$8,000 = 1 Network Server

$8,075 = Renovate and enlarge lab to accommodate academy technical class




7000

Indirect: For indirect approved rate, visit CDE Web site at: http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/ac/ic/

Note: indirect is not charged on line item 6000

Total: = $2,778









Examples of District Match


  • Smaller class size

  • Extra preps for Academy Coordinator(s) and teachers

  • Release time for curriculum development, program planning, and team building

  • Counselor assignment for supplemental Academy-only activities or smaller counselor-to-student ratio than other counselors

  • Additional staff and administrative hours spent on CPA events/needs that are not provided for other programs/students

  • Staff development, in-services, and workshops related to the Academy

  • Transportation for field trips, to postsecondary classes, to internships, and job shadowing locations

  • Program activities applied using any part of another grant (Perkins, Smaller Learning Communities, Agriculture Incentive Grant, Prop 1D, etc.)

  • Administrative time specifically applied to supporting/coordinating the Academy

  • Substitute costs to support program activities

  • Equipment purchased for the academy

  • Instructional and classified assistants for academy-only projects that are over and above normal workload.

  • A Partnership Academy Regional Occupation Program (ROP) class can be counted as a district match if the funding for this class is allocated from the district and if the ROP class is Academy-pure, meaning that it is being offered to only academy students as a class for the Partnership Academy.

Bi-Tech General Information

To make purchase requisitions and purchase orders from your CPA budget, you will use the District purchasing system – Bi-Tech. The link below will take you to the District Purchasing Department web page, where detailed procedures and forms are available for download. The District typically provides several training sessions on the Bi-Tech system each school year, and it is to your benefit to attend these sessions. You may contact the purchasing department for information on these training sessions, or contact Mike Aaronian to express your interest in this training. At most school sites, the office staff will have someone responsible for making purchase orders, and they are an invaluable resource in the purchasing and receiving processes. Delmy Cornejo at the CCRC office is also available to answer questions regarding the Bi-Tech system, but it is ultimately the responsibility of the Academy Lead. Within the purchasing department, Mary Kitchen (510-231-1191) is usually your best contact person. She is extremely knowledgeable about the systems, forms, training, and procedures necessary to effectively make, track, and receive purchases.

Link to the Purchasing Department Web Page:

http://www.wccusd.net/page/333



Section VII – Academy Operations - The CCASN Toolbox

One of the best resources for supporting you in your efforts to lead an academy is the College & Career Academy Support Network at the University of California at Berkeley. CCCASN has developed the Toolbox, an online collection of tools and resources. The link to the toolbox is:

http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/toolbox.php

In this section of the Lead Teacher Handbook, you can learn about the different categories of the CCCASN Toolbox and view samples from each section. It is strongly encouraged that you visit and use the CCCASN website frequently, as it is the mission of CCCASN to support you and your academy team. Here are the main sections of the CCCASN Toolbox:



  • Mentorships and Internships

  • Academy Structures

  • Teacher Selection and Teaching

  • Student Recruitment and Selection

  • Student Contracts, Interventions and Recognitions

  • Partnerships with Employers and Community

  • Parent Involvement

  • Connection to Higher Education

  • Tracking Progress

The Mentorships and Internships Section:

In this section of the CCCASN toolbox, you will find an abundance of resources supporting mentorships and internships. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=7 . The sample resource below, “Planning Your Mentorship”, talks about potential mentor/mentee goals and measurements that you might consider.

“Planning Your Mentorship:

You have goals for this experience, so perhaps the student mentee does, too. They may be quite different. The challenge is for you and the student to plan an experience that reaches both sets of goals. Mentorship activities can be flexible, but they are more successful when mentors and mentees have something to work on together; it gives them more direction. Completing the student/mentor contract gives you a tangible focus for the relationship.

Examples of goals for mentees are:

• Learn specific skills. Example: "I want to know how to write a business letter, or how to use the main branch of the public library."

• Gain an overview of careers. Example: "I want to learn more about careers in business education, science, engineering, health, law, banking, law enforcement, social services, television, theater, military, and/or accounting. “I would like to gain an understanding of what an accountant or engineer does day-to-day and what skills and training are required."

• Improved personal growth. Example: "I hope to become more comfortable in communication with adults. “I will improve my study habits; will complete all homework and turn it in on time, will spend time reading for an hour and not watch TV!”

Examples of goals for mentors are:

• Help the mentee grow/learn in specified ways. Example: Help the mentee gain confidence in his/her abilities. Teach the mentee about mentor's work or work in another field.

• Help mentee to explore the career field of their interest

• Introduce mentee to post-secondary education options

• Help mentee explore scholarship and financial aid options for college

• Help mentee qualify for a better paying job or a job in the career focus area

• Assist mentee to improve in specific learning or study skills

• Introduce mentee to new cultural experiences

Measurements might include:

• Mentee improves his/her grades due to learning and study skills we addressed

• Mentee can make informed career decisions based on research and knowledge about career options

• Mentee engages in two or three job interviews and feels more confident with each one

• Mentee attends a ballet, opera, and museum event with mentor this year”

The Academy Structures Section:

This section of the CCCASN toolbox contains a collection of resources that relate to the structure of your academy. There are resources ranging from potential academy requirements to student information forms. The direct link to this section is:

http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=8

The sample resource below describes what requirements might be for an incoming student into your academy.

“Academy Requirements

The Academy is a three-year accelerated learning program. Once accepted, students will be required to remain in the Academy for at least one year (two semesters). Attendance or behavioral problems will result in a transfer to an alternative education program.

Academic courses with the Academy meet California State University and the University of California requirements for admission.

Upon high school graduation, students will receive a specialized high school diploma and will have the option of attending college, receiving advanced technical training or going directly into employment in business and industry.

Student elective classes will be determined by the Academy requirements.

Students may be required to attend special summer programs in pre-algebra, English and computer skills and/or make up necessary graduation requirements. Summer apprenticeships and training programs will be required as well.

Academic achievement is the highest priority for the Partnership Academies! Tutoring, make-up sessions, working with the business partners, meeting your mentor, and community service projects must have first priority over other activities.”

Teacher Selection and Teaching

The Teacher Selection and Teaching section of the CCCASN toolbox includes resources related to forming teacher teams as well as a few resources for teacher collaboration. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=9. The sample resource below is the “Teacher Information Form” and might be useful when trying to recruit a teacher to join your Academy/Pathway teacher team.

“Teacher Information

Form
Overview:



The Academy will be a school-within-a-school that will use an interdisciplinary team approach to learning. Selected students* will progress through this three-year program with the same Academy staff which will consist of selected teachers from the fields of math, science, language arts, and social studies.
Goals:

All Academies share one common goal:

To work cooperatively with local business/industry within the framework of the public schools to provide a bridge to carry students from education to employment and/or higher education.
OBJECTIVES:

As a replication it has been proven that students participating in Academy programs have developed:

improved attitudes towards school and learning

improved academic performance

improved self-esteem

job and work skills

knowledge of the world of work

viable career paths
KEY PROGRAM FEATURES:

Inter-related academic and technical courses tailored to the needs and career interests of the students

Small class size

Easy access to tutoring and individual instructional attention

Counseling services from a specially assigned counselor

Careful monitoring of individual student performance and attendance

Frequent contact between the school and parents

First-hand exposure to career information through fieldtrips, guest speakers, a mentor program, and industry-loaned instructors

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF:

The classroom teachers and the specially assigned counselor who are in direct daily contact with the students have an enormous influence on Academy students and are crucial to the success of the program. Teachers selected for these programs have:

the opportunity to perform new professional roles, such as coordinating with industry

common, and often extra, release (or preparation) periods

the esprit de corps of a small, well-integrated department

the opportunity for professional grown, such as acquiring skills in electronics, computer operation, and management

the opportunity to develop curriculum, and create and implement innovative instructional approaches

the sense of accomplishment and stimulation that comes from being part of a program that dramatically changes student outlook and performance

increased involvement with students and parents on a personal level
SUMMARY:

Research has demonstrated that high school students who are under-achievers can profit from a close identity with a supportive group of teachers and peers. The Academy approach provides this structure.


Student Recruitment and Selection

This section of the Toolbox provides some resources around recruiting students into your Academy/Pathway. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=10. The sample resource below might be shared with parents whose student has expressed an interest in joining your Academy/Pathway.

“Parent Intro

Letter


Date:
Parent Name

Parent Street Address

City, State, ZIP

Dear Parents:


Your freshman student has indicated interest in and/or has been recommended for the Partnership Academy Program. He/she will be interviewed in a few weeks for enrollment into the program. Out of the names we have been given, 50 will be chosen for next year’s sophomore class.
The Academy staff has talked with most of the students about the Academy. The students were instructed to share that information with you, the parents. Since some of them may not have done that, we are writing you this letter and including an informational brochure so that you might become acquainted with the program.
Basically, the Academy shows students how their school subjects are related to the world of work. It provides an excellent background for students who are interested in pursuing further training, education, or work in careers if fields of their interests and goals. Students are closely monitored in smaller classes. Attendance, achievement, improvement, and high school graduation are major priorities. Students who meet the requirements are given job opportunities at industry sites.
If your student is accepted into the program, you will be invited to a follow-up meeting in mid-May. A letter will be sent to you regarding this.

If you are interested in learning more about this program as it relates to your student, please call:

Teacher/Director/Counselor

Telephone Number”


Student Contracts, Interventions and Recognitions

Check out this section of the Toolbox to get ideas around student contracts, interventions and recognitions. The direct link to this section of the Toolbox is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=11. The sample resource below is an example of a student contract that could be used for an intervention.

“Breach of Student Contract

Student Name: ________________________________ Date: ___________________


Upon enrollment in this Partnership Academy, you signed an agreement that indicated your agreement, and commitment to, the following standards:
Academic Performance:

It is expected that students in the Academy seek out assistance in courses in which they perceive a need for help. Teachers within the Academy have regularly scheduled office hours and are available at other times upon request. Students who receive a grade below a “C” in any class must request tutoring from the instructor and may be required to attend after-school tutoring.


Attendance:

Attendance at school is always imperative. In the Academy it is that much more important because of our commitment to the industry partners and our community to educate future workers and professionals. It is expected that Academy students will have exemplary attendance.


Professional Behavior and Attitude:

Since we frequently interface with the industry community, it is important that behavior and attitude reflect knowledge about our specific pathway. We expect



  1. Behavior that respects the rules and regulations of that industry

  2. A professional demeanor and appearance

  3. An attitude of enthusiasm and seriousness regarding school, the Academy program, and each student’s goals.

The Academy staff has expressed concern regarding your progress toward achieving these goals. The following must be addressed to ensure your continued enrollment in the Academy program:


The following are suggestions for improvement:
I agree to address the above mentioned concerns.
Student Signature: _______________________________________

Date: __________________


Parent(s)

Signature: _________________________________________________________________”


Partnerships with Employers and Community

This section of the handbook contains several tools for engaging with employers and your community. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=15. The sample resource below provides some tips to employers around working with teenagers.

“GUIDELINES FOR BUSINESS/INDUSTRY PARTICIPANTS

1. Hands-on activities are the best. Students learn by doing.

2. Give your student some sample job descriptors for yourself and others in your department.

3. Remember that shyness or false bravado is often used as a defense mechanism- don't take it personally.

4. Think of ways to have your student feel comfortable in a new and unfamiliar environment, e.g.:

• Introduction to co-workers

• Outline of how the first day will look

• Location of restrooms

5. Use your student's name and make sure the student knows and remembers yours (supply your business card).

6. Set up an activity that creates a sense of independence, e.g.:

• Have the student make a phone call for you to set up an appointment or research a topic.

• Allow the student to follow a piece of paperwork through its normal cycle in your department.

• Set up a scavenger hunt that requires the student to go to several locations to get some information for you.

7. Schedule a break for your student- eat lunch with them.

8. Most of all, have fun!”

 

Parent Involvement

The Parent Involvement section of the CCCASN Toolbox has great ideas for getting parents involved with your program. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=12. The sample resource below is an approach to getting feedback from parents about your program.

“Parent


Survey

Parent Name: ____________________________________________

Student Name: ___________________________________________ Grade: _______
Dear Parent:
The following survey is to help us determine the impact of the Academy program on the students enrolled. The goals of the Academy are to help students make informed career decisions, to prepare them with knowledge and skills needed to succeed in post-secondary education, and to prepare them with employable skills. Please let us know how we are doing so that we can create a valid and valuable program for our students.
Please rate these statements using the following scale by placing a check-mark in the column expressing your opinion.

Please circle the answer that best describes your opinion and provide written explanation below each statement.


This program has helped prepare my child for success in college.
Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

This program has helped prepare my child for success in the workplace.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

This program has provided my child with opportunities to explore career options.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

This program has provided a support structure not found in the traditional high school setting.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

The school-within-a-school, 3-year Academy structure has provided continuity and focus to the high school experience.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

The integration of curriculum between subjects through projects, application of academy theory to industry situations, and coordination between the Academy teaching team has made the learning process more meaningful to and better understood by your child.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree

I would recommend the Academy to other parents for their children.


Strongly Agree / Agree / Somewhat Agree /Disagree”
Please rate your overall satisfaction with the Academy. Circle one of the following:

Exceeds Expectations/ Meets Expectations/ Needs Improvement/ Unacceptable

Please list ways in which you have participated in the Academy program and/or Parents’ Club (speaker, chaperone, judge at event, awards, advisory, fundraising, etc.):

If you have any additional comments or recommendations you would like to make, please list them below:

Thank you for helping us to evaluate and improve our program. If you have any questions, please contact:

Name:


Telephone:”

Connection to Higher Education

Making connections to higher education can be challenging for students. Check out this section of the Toolbox for ideas and tools for assisting with making those connections. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=16. The sample resource below provides a list of questions that students and mentors could discuss around college and career planning.

“CAREER PLANNING PROCESS

Students and mentors should go over the following questions together:

1. What are some aspects about your personality that should be considered when choosing a career area for yourself?

2. What are the factors that you consider important when choosing a career (i.e., money, time, education, job functions, geographic location, etc.)?

3. Choose three occupational areas of interest

4. Identify the factors that made these areas interesting to you (i.e., you like working with people, you like a fast pace, you like managing finances and records, you like to draw, you like the technology, etc.)

5. What level of employment is your ultimate career goal? Where do you want to be when you are at the top of your career?

6. What level of employment is your first career goal (i.e., do you want to first aim towards a beginning or technical level job and continue your education while you work? Or do you want to complete your education first and enter your career at a higher level?)

7. How many years of education and how much expense are you and your family willing and/or able to contribute towards your education- Will you need a job?

8. At this point, do a realistic evaluation of your own ability and willingness to proceed with the plan you have formulated thus far. If you have any doubts, go back and start at the beginning to determine where you might need to alter your answers and your plan.

9. Choose two careers that meet all of the parameters that you have determined are important to you and explain why you chose them- These will be the careers for which we research colleges and scholarships and apply for entrance in the fall. Please discuss this in depth with your family before making this selection.”

 

Tracking Progress

In the Tracking Progress section of the CCCASN Toolbox, you will find a wide variety of resources for keeping track of student progress. The direct link to this section is: http://CCASN.berkeley.edu/resources.php?c=17. The sample resource provided might give you some ideas on how to monitor student progress during a work based learning experience.

“Worksite Monitoring Report

Employer: ____________________________________ Supervisor: ___________________

Are the following forms (or copies of them) on file and available at the worksite?

Time sheets Emergency contact information

Work schedule TB clearance, if appropriate

Signed parental consent
Is the worksite safe?

Does the student have an assigned place to check in?

Are there any major concerns from the Supervisor?

Are there any major concerns from the student?

How is the student doing?

(attendance, progress, areas of improvement, strengths, weaknesses)


Comments:


Worksite Evaluator Signature: _______________________________ Date: ___________”

Section VIII – Working with ConnectEd California

ConnectEd is the District Partner in Linked Learning implementation, and provides resources and professional development for pathway teams and educational leaders. This section will provide a collection of resources developed by ConnectEd for their District Partners.

Pathway Community of Practice Continuum (Draft, 2012)



Pathway Community of Practice Continuum – Collaborative Team Cycle of Inquiry and Improvement
Collaborative teams in Linked Learning pathways can use this tool to understand the design of high quality, outcome-aligned performance tasks and units of instruction and the creation of a collaborative culture of continuous improvement, to assess current status as a learning-focused community of practice, to set specific goals, to reflect on progress and the results of their efforts, and to identify support needs.


Identifying and Using Learning Outcomes

Academic and CTE teachers work with colleagues on their pathway team, and with district and industry partners, to create clear pathway, course and project outcomes aligned with academic content, Common Core and CTE standards. These outcomes guide their pathway’s program of study and their assessment, curricular and instructional planning.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Pathway outcomes…




Pathway outcomes…




Pathway outcomes...




include knowledge and skills from more than one domain: academic, career, or 21st century




include academic, career, and 21st century knowledge and skills




integrate academic, career, and 21st century knowledge and skills within the context of the pathway theme










align with either the school’s or district’s graduate outcomes.




align with both the school’s and district’s graduate outcomes










partially reflect the measurable performance level necessary for college and career readiness.




fully reflect Common Core and CTE standards, and the level of performance necessary for college and career readiness.










are partially articulated across the grade levels, forming progress benchmarks




are fully articulated across the grade levels through progress benchmarks




include some key standards




Include all key standards appropriate to the pathway




Include all key standards appropriate to the pathway




Implicitly inform the program of study, curriculum, instruction, and assessment




partially guide the design of the pathway’s program of study, instructional and assessment




fully drive the pathway’s program of study, instruction and assessment




Course and project outcomes are largely independent of pathway outcomes




50% of pathway teachers use pathway outcomes to drive curriculum and assessment through aligned course and project outcomes




100% of pathway teachers use aligned course and project outcomes to drive curriculum and assessment in single classes and across the pathway




School personnel can generally refer to pathway outcomes




School personnel can describe the pathways and explain generally how outcomes are supported within the program of study, curriculum, and assessment




Teachers describe how a specific skill or standard assessed connects to pathways outcomes




Students and industry partners can make general reference to pathway outcomes.




When asked, students can generally describe how their work addresses a pathway outcome.




Students can articulate where they are in the process toward outcome mastery



















Developing and Using Common Criteria and Rubrics:

Academic and CTE teachers collaborate with colleagues on their team, and with district and industry partners when appropriate to select the outcomes-aligned criteria and language in common rubrics that they will use to judge the quality of student products and performances.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Teachers design/adapt rubrics:




Teachers design/adapt common rubrics:




Teachers design/adapt common rubrics:




that are checklists that describe task completion





with quantitative criteria language that does not address task complexity and quality of student work




with descriptive language to address task complexity and quality of student work as a means to show learning




that are project-specific, typically in isolation from each other




that are aligned to pathway, school, or district outcomes




that are aligned to pathway, school, and district outcomes




are independent of pathway outcomes




that are aligned to key standards




that are aligned to key standards





that they write by themselves in isolation




in collaboration with colleagues




with help from students and industry partners
















that, when appropriate, are validated by industry partners as representing what it means to perform well for that criteria










to score one or two tasks with shared criteria




use more than two common tasks that are designed to score multiple tasks with shared criteria





  • as a formative learning tool for students




as a formative learning tool for students




which students use them for self-assessment and to assess anchors/exemplars in order to internalize quality criteria and levels


Designing Assessment Tasks:

Academic and CTE teachers, collaborate with industry and other partners to design authentic performance assessment tasks for projects and courses by which students will demonstrate their progress towards and defend their mastery of course, pathway and district graduate outcomes, as measured on common rubrics.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Performance assessment tasks:




Performance assessment tasks:




Performance assessment tasks:




are designed by a single teacher for individual classroom use.




are designed by an interdisciplinary teacher team for application in multiple subject areas




are designed by the interdisciplinary teacher teams with industry partners for application in multiple subject areas




are aligned to project-specific rubrics




are aligned to pathway outcomes and common rubrics




are intentionally aligned to pathway outcomes and common rubrics, mindful of past patterns of student learning










lead to a culminating event at the course level or grade level




lead to a culminating event at the course level or grade level with clearly aligned to pathway outcomes




are designed to have students complete a performance task once and their grade is recorded




are designed to have students receive feedback about a task and have at least one opportunity to revise and reflect upon their work




allow students to have multiple opportunities to revise and perform the task and reflect upon their progress toward pathway outcomes










provide some, but not all of the following information: knowledge, materials, timeline, parameters, product or performance




provide clear instructions, including the knowledge and materials needed, timeline, and models of performance or product students are to create










provide a somewhat realistic context





provide as realistic a context as possible










provide some differentiated access to task, though some aspects may be more difficult for some students to obtain




comprise a system of scaffolded and rigorous performance assessments that culminate in a clear body of work that shows demonstration of mastery of all aspects of the pathway’s grade level benchmarks at the end of the year




that culminate with the class or teacher as audience





include an internal audience or consequence in the design of performance assessments




ensure quality by:

    • including a broader audience or client beyond the school

    • requiring some form of public exhibition

    • requiring critique by teachers as well as students and external industry partners using a shared set of rigor and quality indicators

Designing Units of Instruction:

Academic and CTE teachers collaborate with industry and other partners to design integrated units of instruction that reflect the five linked learning behaviors of learning and teaching (BLTs) and through which students demonstrate proficiency on the performance assessment tasks as measured by the rubric.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Individual teachers:




Pathway teams:




Pathway teams:




design and implement single-discipline project-based units





collaboratively align and integrate themes and essential questions with either other academic disciplines or industry partners




collaboratively align and integrate themes, essential questions, multiple content areas and learning beyond the classroom (e.g. work-based learning) into the core of the multidisciplinary project




use elements of the Linked Learning Learning & Teaching Framework in the design of projects




partially align units of instruction to pathway outcomes





align units of instruction to the pathway outcomes, planning with the end in mind.





assess student work upon culmination of student learning




develop formative assessments while teaching the unit to monitor student learning




develop in advance formative assessments to be used at specific points throughout the unit to monitor learning




design units with discipline-specific projects




link the design of project based units of instruction to the expectations of the performance assessments




design the units so students get practice and have support meeting the demands of the performance task.










some modeling of proficient performances or products provided for students




ensure units provide exemplars/anchors to inform students and teachers about what “good” looks like




use their own instructional strategies to support student mastery of course outcomes




begin to discuss and project teams try shared instructional strategies




collaborate and agree to use shared instructional strategies throughout the entire pathway and collect data on implementation and impact of strategies
Designing Formative Assessments to Monitor Learning:

Pathway teachers design short-cycle formative assessments to be used during their units of instruction to (a) identify students who need additional time and support for learning; (b) use patterns in student learning to discover strengths and weaknesses in curriculum and our individual teaching; and (c) measure individual and common progress toward pathway outcomes and key standards, (d) provide corrective feedback to students so they can revise and refine their work

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)



Teachers monitor learning:



Teachers monitor learning:



Teachers monitor learning:



sporadically during the task or lessons



before the end of a task through formative assessments



by using formative assessments to note progress toward the end outcomes and plan the next action to address student learning needs



at the end of a task or a set of lessons through quizzes or tests



by collecting data that measures daily instruction and informs of student progress towards culminating outcome



by collecting data from formative assessments and by involving students in self-assessment to understand their progress toward the end outcomes, their learning needs, and plan their next action



and view the data it yields as an indicator of student learning only



to note their strengths and weaknesses in the curriculum and in their teaching



by using the results of formative assessments to improve the curriculum and their teaching












in order to revise their units of instruction by incorporating feedback from all of the stakeholders (students, industry partners, pathway co-teachers)



Glossary


Term

Definition

Common Rubrics




Backwards Planning

The teacher starts with outcomes for the students and then plans the curriculum to lead toward those outcomes.

Formative Assessment

Assessment that provides feedback to the teacher and to students for the purpose of improving instruction and learning. Frequently referred to as “assessment FOR learning”. Formative assessment includes minute-by-minute monitoring of student learning, checking for understanding, diagnostic and progress monitoring assessments, and pre-assessments, and student self-assessments.

Learning Outcome (or Learning Target)

The academic knowledge, behaviors, and skills that students (or others) are expected to learn and demonstrate. Learning outcomes can be created for a specific lesson, task or project, for a course, or for a student’s career in a pathway or school.

Multidisciplinary Project

When working on multi-disciplinary projects, students are charged with finding viable solutions to real problems, or with achieving specific individual or group outcomes, through units of instruction that are horizontally aligned in several disciplines.

Performance-Based Assessment (ConnectEd’s definition)

A form of testing that requires students to perform a task rather than select an answer from a ready-made list. It is an activity that requires to construct a response, create a product, or to perform a demonstration. The more it reflects a “real world” situation, the more authentic it is.

Performance Assessment (Envision’s definition)

A multi-step assignment that asks students to create a response or product in order to demonstrate and measure complex skills.

Performance Mapping

The process of determining and representing performance criteria within a purposely designed course and pathway scope and sequence.

Portfolio

A systematic and organized collection of a student’s work that exhibits to others the direct evidence of a student’s efforts, achievements, and progress toward learning outcomes over a period of time.  The collection should involve the student in selection of its contents, and should include information about the performance criteria, the rubric of criteria for judging merit, and evidence of student self-reflection or evaluation.

Portfolio Assessment

A portfolio becomes a portfolio assessment when (1) the assessment purpose is defined; (2) criteria or methods are made clear for determining what is put into the portfolio, by whom, and when; and (3) criteria for assessing either the collection or individual pieces of work are identified and used to make judgments about performance. Portfolios can be designed to assess student progress, effort, and/or achievement, and encourage students to reflect on their learning.

Rubric

A rubric is an important teaching and assessment tool that clearly defines for the student, teacher, and others a range of performance and/or product quality for specific criteria linked to student learning outcomes. Rubrics have performance criteria, levels and descriptors.

Performance Criteria: Criteria define the attributes of the performance and/or product being assessed on the rubric.

Performance Levels: Levels define the scale for scoring performance and/or product quality.

Performance Descriptors: Descriptors specifically define the attributes of the performance or product for each criterion, at each level of quality.



Summative Assessment

A culminating assessment, which gives information on students' mastery of content, knowledge, or skills. Frequently referred to as “assessment OF learning”.

Program of Study Worksheet






9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

ACADEMIC CORE

English













Mathematics













Science













History/Social Science













Language Other
Than English













Visual and
Performing Arts













TECHNICAL CORE

Technical Courses















WORK-BASED

Work-based Learning Opportunities













SUPPORT SERVICES

Support Services and Personal-ization













INTEGRATED CURRICULUM

Integrated Curriculum













Gap Analysis Worksheet

Gap Analysis Worksheet: To be used in conjunction with the Rubric for Linked Learning Pathway Certification

To facilitate team collaboration and shared leadership, each certification criteria section is color coded with a page break between each section.




Pathway: Lead: School: District:

1. PATHWAY DESIGN

The pathway is designed with a structure, governance, and program of study that provide all students with opportunities for both postsecondary and career success.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


1.1

Design Structure

1.1.1. Pathway theme


Pathway theme is either (1) defined narrowly and, as such, limits postsecondary and/or career options for participants, or (2) is not designed to accommodate a full range of students regardless of their prior academic achievement and/or postsecondary aspirations.

Pathway represents a theme that is broad enough to appeal to and engage any student, regardless of his or her prior academic achievement and postsecondary aspirations. The theme has been selected based on at least student interest and one other criterion.

Pathway represents a theme that is broad enough to appeal to and engage any student, regardless of his or her prior academic achievement and postsecondary aspirations. The theme has been thoughtfully selected based on student interest and several other criteria, which may include teacher expertise, regional workforce needs, existence of related career and technical education (CTE) course sequences, articulation opportunities with nearby postsecondary institutions, and the interest of industry partners.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.2. Program of study


Pathway consists of a program of study that either (1) is not coherent, (2) spans less than 3 years, (3) includes fewer than three academic courses and one technical course per grade level, or (4) is not sequenced and coordinated.

Pathway consists of a coherent program of study that spans at least grades 10–12 and includes at least three core academic courses and one technical course (or equivalent) in each grade level. By design, the curriculum is sequenced and coordinated.

Pathway consists of a coherent 4-year program of study that includes core academic courses and at least one technical course at each grade level. By design, the curriculum is sequenced and coordinated.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.3. Student recruitment and selection


Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process either (1) is not formalized, (2) does not provide open access, (3) assigns students, or (4) yields a demographic distribution that is substantially different than that of the school and district.

Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process is formalized and ensures open access to students who volunteer for the pathway based on their interests. Pathway demographics reflect relatively well (within 20 percent of racial/ethnic, gender, and achievement groups) those of the school and district.

Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process is formalized and ensures open access to students who volunteer for the pathway based on their interests. Pathway demographics reflect almost exactly those of the school and district.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.4. Cohort scheduling


Cohort scheduling is not implemented at a level that allows the vast majority of pathway students to participate in multidisciplinary projects.

Pathway students participate as a cohort in the academic and technical courses that are part of the Program of Study to enable flexible use of class time and instructional methodologies that promote multidisciplinary projects and work-based learning experiences.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides daily collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.5. Staff collaboration


Pathway staff either (1) do not operate as a professional learning community, (2) do not meet regularly, or (3) do not make effective use of collaboration time.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides weekly collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides daily collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.6. Pathway preparation and orientation


Students enter into a pathway with little or no orientation or transition services.

The pathway provides an orientation and other transition services for incoming students preferably beginning in middle school and involving parents.

For two or more years prior to pathway entry, parents and students are informed of pathway options and are exposed to a sequence of activities to ensure appropriate pathway selection, preparation, and smooth transition.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.7. Postsecondary articulation


Pathway may have connections with local postsecondary institutions, but formal agreements are either lacking or limited.

Pathway promotes a seamless transition at least to local community college(s) by putting in place articulation agreements, dual- enrollment, and/or other formal and informal activities. Articulation with other institutions is planned or in progress.

Pathway assures a seamless transition to multiple postsecondary education and training options through articulation agreements, dual- enrollment, and other formal and informal activities.










1.2

Governance

1.2.1. Advisory board with broad representation


An advisory board may exist, but either (1) is not active, (2) meets infrequently, (3) doesn’t serve in an advisory capacity, or (4) includes limited stakeholders.

An active advisory board meets at least quarterly to set policies, develop resources, and advise the Program of Study. It includes representation from several involved stakeholders, including employers, educators, and community partners.

An active advisory board meets monthly to set policies, develop resources, and advise the Program of Study. It includes representation from involved employers, students, parents, higher education and community partners, pathway staff, and district and site administration.













Pathway: Lead: School: District:

2. Engaged Learning

In supportive learning communities, students meet technical and academic standards and college entrance requirements through real-world applications, integrated project-/problem-based instruction, authentic assessments, and work-based learning.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


2.1 Standards-Aligned

Curriculum

2.1.1. Academic core


The academic curriculum is not rigorous enough to lead to student mastery on standardized tests or other authentic assessment measures.

The academic curriculum is aligned to state standards and designed to lead to student mastery on standardized tests as well as on more authentic assessment measures.

The academic curriculum is aligned to state standards and demonstrated to lead to student mastery on standardized tests as well as on more authentic assessment measures.










2.1 Standards-Aligned Curriculum

2.1.2. Technical core



The technical courses either (1) are limited to fewer than three courses or (2) are not aligned to state CTE or industry standards.

A sequence or cluster of three or more technical courses (or their equivalent) is aligned to state CTE standards and/or industry standards.

A sequence or cluster of six or more technical courses is aligned to state CTE standards and/or industry standards. Multiple sequences offer specialization options for students.










2.2 Preparation for Postsecondary Options

2.2.1. Postsecondary preparatory curriculum



The pathway Program of Study does not adequately prepare students for success—without remediation—in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.

The pathway Program of Study prepares students for success—without remediation— in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.

As evidenced by several years of data, the pathway Program of Study prepares students for success—without remediation—in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.










2.2 Preparation for Postsecondary Options

2.2.2. Technical component



A sequence or cluster of technical courses either (1) consists of fewer than three courses, (2) delivers basic or advanced industry knowledge and skills, but not both, (3) does not adequately emphasize industry-related knowledge and skills, or (4) does not use authentic applications.

A sequence or cluster of three or more technical courses delivers basic and advanced industry knowledge and skills. The focus is on preparing youth for high-skill, high-wage employment by emphasizing industry-related knowledge and skills, using authentic applications that bring learning to life.

A sequence or cluster of six or more technical courses delivers basic and advanced industry knowledge and skills. The focus is on preparing youth for high-skill, high-wage employment by emphasizing industry-related knowledge and skills, using authentic applications that bring learning to life.










2.3 Real-World Relevance

2.3.1. Real-world relevance




Attempts at delivering academic core courses using career-related applications either lack authenticity or lower student expectations.

Academic core courses deliver standards- based content through authentic, career- or industry-related applications. Pathways alter how core academic subjects are taught; they do not lower expectations about what is taught.

Academic core courses deliver standards-based content through complex, authentic, career- or industry-related applications. Students interact regularly with industry partners. Student assessment incorporates both academic and industry standards.










2.4 Integrated Curriculum

2.4.1. Multidisciplinary integrated curriculum



Use of inquiry-based instruction is not yet common practice among many pathway teachers and/or regular teachers. This approach actively fosters student development of communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st-Century Skills.

Pathway teachers commonly use inquiry- based instruction that enables students to experience authentic theme-based situations that require integrating knowledge and skills from several disciplines. This approach fosters communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st- Century Skills.

A good portion of the pathway curriculum is delivered through inquiry-based instruction that enables students to experience authentic theme- based situations that are integrated and multidisciplinary. Through this approach, students master communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st-Century Skills, which are assessed and reported.










2.4 Integrated Curriculum

2.4.2. Curricular alignment



There is relatively little curricular alignment across disciplines and/or grade levels.

Teachers collaborate within and across disciplines and grade levels to provide students with a coordinated, coherent curriculum.

Teachers use formalized processes and structures to collaborate within and across disciplines and grade levels to provide students with a highly coordinated, coherent curriculum.










2.5 Instruction and Assessment

2.5.1. Project-/Problem-based approach



Pathway students may participate in multidisciplinary projects, but they are either infrequent, include few disciplines, or are brief (i.e., days).

Each year, pathway students participate in at least two extended (2- to 4-week) multidisciplinary projects that integrate academic and technical course content. Additional projects are planned or in development.

Each year, pathway students participate in several extended multidisciplinary projects that integrate academic and technical course content.










2.5 Instruction and Assessment

2.5.2. Authentic assessment



Pathway teachers rely almost exclusively on traditional or standardized assessments to measure student success, and they make little effort to design and use more authentic assessments.

To complement traditional or standardized student assessments, pathway teachers periodically design and use a variety of assessments to gain an accurate understanding of student learning. Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate skills and knowledge through real-world application.

To complement traditional and standardized student assessments, pathway teachers regularly design and use a variety of assessments to gain an accurate understanding of student learning. Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of skills and knowledge through real-world application.










2.6 Work-Based Learning (WBL)

2.6.1. Coordinated, sequenced, and scaled work-based learning (WBL)



Work-based learning (WBL) experiences are available to a limited number of pathway students. Plans are being developed to expand these opportunities.

Pathway offers one or more WBL experiences to a large percentage of pathway students. Pathway has plans and resources to substantially expand WBL experiences in the next year or two so that they become more coordinated, sequenced, and scaled.

Pathway offers real-world learning opportunities to all pathway students through a 4-year coordinated and structured sequence of WBL experiences that progresses in duration and intensity and increases student expectations and independence.










2.6 Work-Based Learning (WBL)

2.6.2. Connected to academic and technical coursework



Students are left to their own devices

to make connections between WBL experiences and classroom learning.



At least in limited ways (e.g., through reflection), WBL experiences do not occur in a vacuum: they are connected to and reinforce classroom learning.

In an intentional and structured way, WBL experiences and classroom learning mutually reinforce one another.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.1. Supportive atmosphere




Pathway promotes personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and/or strong student- teacher relationships, but not necessarily all three.

Pathway maintains personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and strong teacher-student relationships. Students feel supported.

Pathway maintains personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and strong teacher-student relationships. Students feel supported, highly valued, and part of a family.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.2. Student engagement



Pathway staff attempt to create, but have not fully succeeded in doing so, a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning.

Pathway staff consciously and consistently work to create a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning, both in and out of the school setting.

Evidence suggests that staff have succeeded in creating a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning, both in and out of the school setting.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.3. Differentiated instruction



Daily instruction may be differentiated by some teachers some of the time, but doing so is based on individual teacher training and inclination, rather than pathway staff collaboration and coordination.

In a somewhat routine way, daily instruction is designed with the knowledge that students vary in their preferred method of gaining information, understanding ideas, and demonstrating mastery. Some pathway teachers use multiple methods of presenting course content and assessing student learning to address each student’s learning needs.

Through formalized processes, daily instruction is designed with the knowledge that students vary in their preferred method of gaining information, understanding ideas, and demonstrating mastery. All pathway teachers regularly use multiple methods of presenting course content and assessing student learning to address each student’s learning needs.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.4. Academic intervention



Academic interventions are emerging and serve the needs of some students, but more must be done to address a range of needs for students.

Pathway students performing below grade level are supported by a range of services, which may include supplemental instruction, tutoring, credit recovery, before- and/or after- school programs, and academic support programs.

Pathway students performing below grade level are supported by a range of services that, to the extent possible, are provided within the pathway and use the pathway’s theme to motivate and engage students in learning. Evidence has demonstrated that these interventions have yielded substantial gains in student achievement.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.5. Guidance and counseling



Pathway students are served by counselors, but they may be assigned alphabetically or by grade level, rather than by pathway.

Pathway has a designated counselor who knows pathway students and is familiar with the unique characteristics and needs of the pathway. The counselor participates actively in pathway team meetings.

Pathway has a designated counselor who knows pathway students well and is familiar with the unique characteristics and needs of the pathway. The counselor participates actively in pathway team meetings. The counselor plays a lead role in recruiting students, coordinating interventions, and aligning course selection and WBL experiences with student interests, among other roles.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.6. College and career planning



Each pathway student has a 4-year pathway Program of Study, but it may neither extend down to middle school nor ahead to postsecondary education, training, and career pursuits.

Each pathway student has a multiyear college and career plan that is informed by a range of college and career planning activities, extends through high school, and guides decisions about postsecondary education, training, and career pursuits.

Each pathway student has an 8- to 10-year college and career plan that establishes a throughline from middle school career exploration activities to postsecondary degree attainment and career pursuits. It is informed by a robust set of college and career planning activities.











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