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. Accessed on January 19, 2016. Suppressions for pedagogical purposes (omission of excerpts with inadequate language level or advertising) marked with […]. Occasional linguistic adjustments to fit standard language marked with [ ].

a What happened to Malala in October 2012?



She was shot on the left side of her forehead by the Taliban.

b According to Malala, is Islam against female education?



No. Islam says that it is not only each girl’s right to get education, it is actually their duty and responsibility.

c Based on Malala’s speech, what can we say about the relationship between violence and education? Can Malala’s words apply to the Brazilian scenario?



Professor/a, espera-se que os/as estudantes percebam que Malala menciona a necessidade da paz para a educação, citando exemplos de países como o Paquistão e o Afeganistão, que sofrem com o terrorismo e as guerras constantes, privando muitas crianças do direito à educação. Nesse sentido, é possível estabelecer uma comparação com o Brasil. Em diversas comunidades de cidades como Rio de Janeiro e São Paulo, escolas são obrigadas a fechar temporariamente por conta de uma “guerra urbana”, em grande parte associada ao tráfico de drogas. Esse tipo de situação é extremamente prejudicial à educação das crianças e dos adolescentes desses locais.

d How does Malala’s speech relate to the reflection “Is education a privilege or a right?”



Professor/a, espera-se que os/as estudantes notem que o discurso de Malala denuncia o atual estado de privilégio que o acesso à escolarização assume em certos locais e advoga pela educação como um direito humano. Seu discurso é um convite à participação de todos/as na luta pela igualdade de oportunidades no acesso à educação, fundamental para a construção de uma cultura de paz em um cenário global ainda muito marcado pela violência e pela discriminação.

e How important can activists and social workers be for the development of society?



Professor/a, sugere-se chamar a atenção dos/as estudantes para o papel que ativistas humanitários/as e assistentes sociais podem desempenhar na luta por igualdade de oportunidades e dignidade, muitas vezes representando aqueles/aquelas que ainda não têm condições de falar por si, por estarem envolvidos/as em relações de opressão e dominação.

10 Have you ever done anything to help your community? If so, what was it? How do you think you and your classmates can contribute to the quality of life of other people near you?



Respostas pessoais.

Exploring further

The stories of the people in this section teach us that there is no minimum or maximum age to start fighting for a change. Find stories of young people who are making a difference in your community, city or country. Share your findings with your classmates.


Página 163

LINGUISTIC LITERACY

Gender equality

Ciências Humanas

1 Discuss in groups: what do these words mean?



Professor/a, os/as estudantes poderão confirmar suas respostas na atividade 2.

a feminism

b patriarchy

c misogyny

d sexism

e misandry

2 In your notebook, match the words from activity 1 to their definitions below. Then compare these definitions to your answers in activity 1.

I “Hatred or mistrust of men.” e

II “The belief that one gender is superior to the other, especially that men are superior to women.” d

III “A doctrine advocating social, political, and economic rights for women equal to those of men.” a

IV “Hatred or mistrust of women.” c

V “A form of social organization in which a male is the head of the family and descent, kinship, and title are traced through the male line.” b

Available at (American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.); www.thefreedictionary.com/sexism (American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.); (Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.); (American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.); (Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014.). Accessed on February 5, 2015.

3 Look at the picture. What do you know about this woman?



Respostas pessoais. Professor/a, informações adicionais sobre Emma Watson encontram-se no Guia Didático, página 248.

MIGUEL ROJO/AFP

4 You are going to read an extract from a speech delivered by Emma Watson at a special event for the HeForShe campaign in 2014. What do you think this campaign is about? Discuss with a partner.

Respostas pessoais. Professor/a, espera-se que os/as estudantes percebam, com base no título da campanha e, posteriormente, na leitura do discurso de Emma Watson, que se trata de uma ação pela igualdade de gêneros. De acordo com o discurso, o objetivo da campanha é “end gender inequality”.
Página 164

5 Now read the extract and check your predictions.

“[…] Today we are launching a campaign called HeForShe.

I am reaching out to you because we need your help. We want to end gender inequality and, to do this, we need everyone involved.

This is the first campaign of its kind at the UN: we want to try and galvanize as many men and boys as possible to be advocates for change. And we don’t just want to talk about it – we want to try and make sure that it’s tangible.

I was appointed as Goodwill Ambassador for UN Women six months ago and the more I’ve spoken about feminism, the more I have realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating. If there is one thing I know for certain, it is that this has to stop.

For the record, feminism, by definition, is the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.

I started questioning gender-based assumptions a long time ago. When I was eight, I was confused at being called ‘bossy’ because I wanted to direct the plays that we would put on for our parents. But the boys were not.

When at 14, I started to be sexualised by certain elements of the media.

When at 15, my girlfriends started dropping out of their beloved sports teams because they didn’t want to appear ‘muscly’.

When at 18, my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided that I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that ‘feminism’ has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating and anti-men, unattractive even.

Why has the word become such an uncomfortable one?

I am from Britain and I think it is right that

I am paid the same as my male counterparts.

I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and the decisions that will affect my life. I think it is right that, socially, I am afforded the same respect as men. But, sadly, I can say that there is no one country in the world where all women can expect to receive these rights. No country in the world can yet say that they have achieved gender equality. These rights, I consider to be human rights, but I am one of the lucky ones. My life is a sheer privilege because my parents didn’t love me less because I was born a daughter. My school did not limit me because I was a girl. My mentors didn’t assume I would go less far because I might give birth to a child one day. These influencers were the gender equality ambassadors that made me who I am today. They may not know it, but they are the inadvertent feminists who are changing the world today. We need more of those.

And if you still hate the word, it is not the word that is important: it’s the idea and the ambition behind it. Because not all women have received the same rights that I have. In fact, statistically, very few have been.
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In 1997, Hillary Clinton made a famous speech in Beijing about women’s rights. Sadly, many of the things that she wanted to change are still true today. But what stood out for me the most was that less than 30 percent of the audience were male. How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?

Men, I would like to take this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue too. Because, to date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society despite my needing his presence as a child as much as my mother’s. I’ve seen young men suffering from mental illness, unable to ask for help for fear it would make them look less of a [man] – in fact, in the UK, suicide is the biggest killer of men between 20 to 49, eclipsing road accidents, cancer and coronary heart disease. I’ve seen men made fragile and insecure by a distorted sense of what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality either.

We don’t often talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes, but I can see that they are and that, when they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence.

If men don’t have to be aggressive in order to be accepted, women won’t feel compelled to be submissive. If men don’t have to control, women won’t have to be controlled. Both men and women should feel free to be sensitive. Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all perceive gender on a spectrum, instead of two sets of opposing ideals. If we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by who we are, we can all be freer. And this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom. […]

You might be thinking: who is this Harry Potter girl and what is she doing speaking at the UN? And it’s a really good question. I’ve been asking myself the same thing. All I know is I care about this problem and I want to make it better. […]

If you believe in equality, you might be one of those inadvertent feminists that I spoke of earlier. And for this I applaud you. We are struggling for a uniting world, but the good news is that we have a uniting movement. It is called HeForShe. I am inviting you to step forward, to be seen and to ask yourself: if not me, who? If not now, when? Thank you very, very much.”

Source: . Accessed on January 20, 2016. Suppressions for pedagogical purposes (omission of excerpts with inadequate language level or advertising) marked with […].

Occasional linguistic adjustments to fit standard language marked with [ ].

6 Read the text again and do these activities in your notebook.

a To whom is the campaign directed?

To men and boys.

b How does Emma Watson define “feminism”? Why has this word become unpopular and uncomfortable?



It is the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes. However, feminism has become mistakenly synonymous with women who are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and even unattractive. It is also misinterpreted as hatred of men.

c Find in the text examples of situations that show gender inequality.



Professor/a, os exemplos estão sublinhados ao longo do próprio texto.
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7 This excerpt was taken from the speech in activity 5. Read it and discuss with a partner: why is it important for men to take part in the feminist movement? How could this change both women’s lives and their own?



Professor/a, espera-se que os/as estudantes percebam que o movimento feminista não defende a superioridade do gênero feminino sobre o masculino, mas a igualdade de gênero e o fim dos estereótipos de masculino e feminino, que afetam também os homens, no sentido de reprimir sua sensibilidade, ao tratá-la como característica feminina a ser suprimida.

If men don’t have to be aggressive in order to be accepted, women won’t feel compelled to be submissive. If men don’t have to control, women won’t have to be controlled. Both men and women should feel free to be sensitive. Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all perceive gender on a spectrum, instead of two sets of opposing ideals.”

AMANDA SAVOINI

Discuss

How have you been affected by gender inequality?

Consider what you learned about women’s rights in the “Contextualization” section. How have women’s rights changed in your community? How would you like them to change in the future?

LINGUISTIC LITERACY

Talking about what others have said: reported speech

Professor/a, o uso dos discursos direto e indireto é sistematizado no “Language reference”, página 201. Sugere-se usar a seção a seu critério.

1 These texts talk about the repercussions of Emma Watson’s speech.



Read them, then discuss the questions with a partner.

Ciências Humanas Linguagens



Emma Watson

Women’s rights work

Watson has promoted education for girls, visiting Bangladesh and Zambia to do so. In July 2014, she was appointed as a UN Women Goodwill Ambassador. In September that year, an admittedly nervous Watson delivered an address at UN Headquarters in New York City to launch the UN Women campaign HeForShe, which calls for men to advocate for gender equality. In that speech she said she began questioning gender-based assumptions at age eight when she was called “bossy” (a trait she has attributed to her being a “perfectionist”) whilst boys were not, and at 14 when she was “sexualised by certain elements of the media”.

Watson’s speech also called feminism “the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities” and declared that the perception of “man-hating” is something that “has to stop”. Watson later said she received threats within 12 hours of making the speech, which left her “raging… If they were trying to put me off (of doing this work), it did the opposite”. In 2015, Malala Yousafzai told Watson she decided to call herself a feminist after hearing Watson’s speech. […]

WIKIPEDIA.ORG/REPRODUCTION



Excerpt from the text available at


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