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. Accessed on January 12, 2016. Occasional linguistic adjustments to fit standard language marked with [ ].
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Useful language

Asking questions

What are the pros of using…?

What are the cons associated with…?

Can you tell me what’s positive/negative about using…?

Are there any positive/negative aspects regarding the use of…?

How can… harm the environment?

Providing information

The first/second/third problem with this energy source is that…

The main advantage/disadvantage of this source is that…

There is always the possibility that…

We can’t forget to mention that…

3 Read these excerpts about energy production in Brazil and, in your notebook, complete each of them with an energy source mentioned in activity 2.



Professor/a, sugere-se perguntar aos/às estudantes o que mais eles/elas sabem sobre os lugares mencionados na atividade.

a

ART: AMANDA SAVOINI; PHOTOS: A- WAGNER TAVARES/PULSAR IMAGENS, B- FOTOEMBER/ISTOCKPHOTO, C- VANDERLEI ALMEIDA/AFP

“[…] 150 MW Osório ______ Wind Farm in Rio Grande do Sul […] comprises 3 ______ wind farms: Osório, Sangradouro and Índios, with a total of 75 generators, and forms the largest ______ wind power generation complex in Latin America.”

Available at . Accessed on January 11, 2016. Suppressions for pedagogical purposes (omission of excerpts with inadequate language level or advertising) marked with […].



b

“The Itaipu hydroelectric power plant, with an installed capacity of 14,000 MW, ranks as the world’s second largest ______ hydropower plant. The project is located on the Paraná River, at the border between Brazil and Paraguay. The facility is operated by Itaipu Binacional.”



Excerpt from the text available at . Accessed on January 11, 2016.

c

“ power ______ Nuclear plants like Angra’s work in relatively small areas, with no gas emissions to warm up the atmosphere, and all of their waste is kept in facilities under permanent monitoring.”



Excerpt from the text available at . Accessed on January 11, 2016.
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d

“The Frade field is located 370 km off […] the coast of Rio de Janeiro in the Northern Campos Basin, Brazil. The heavy __________oil and gas field lies at a water depth of 1,128 m and is estimated to contain 200 m to 300 m barrels of recoverable ___________oil.”



Available at . Accessed on January 11, 2016. Suppressions for pedagogical purposes (omission of excerpts with inadequate language level or advertising) marked with […].

e

ART: AMANDA SAVOINI; PHOTOS: D- AFP, E- ALFFOTO/ISTOCKPHOTO

“A new renewable energy choice is booming in Brazil. The nation’s installed power in sugar cane __________biomass plants has reached 10 GW, according to data provided by the National Electric Energy Agency (ANEEL). This represents about 7 per cent of the total installed capacity in the South American country.”

Excerpt from the text available at . Accessed on January 24, 2016.

4 How much do you know about the energy sources mentioned in activities 2 and 3? Share your knowledge with your classmates. Professor/a, para a realização desta atividade sugere-se estimular os/as estudantes a recorrer ao uso de conhecimento de mundo, a notícias da mídia e ao que aprendem em Geografia e História.

5 Study these charts to answer the questions.



Professor/a, sugere-se revisar o gênero gráfico e seu propósito comunicativo (apresentar informações estatísticas de modo visual).



Brazilian Energy Matrix in 2014

Wood and vegetal coal 8.1%

Hydroelectricity 11.5%

Other renewables 4.2%

Oil and derivatives 39.4%

Main source of renewable energy

Sugarcane 15.7%

Other nonrenewables 0.6%

Uranium 1.3%

Coal 5.7%

Natural gas 13.5%

AMANDA SAVOINI

Information available at . Accessed on February 2, 2016.


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AMANDA SAVOINI

Information available at . Accessed on February 2, 2016.

Energy Supply Structure (%)

14

10



39.4

86

90



60.6

Brazil World OECD Nonrenewable Renewable



OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development)

“The OECD’s origins date back to 1960, when 18 European countries plus the United States and Canada joined forces to create an organisation dedicated to economic development.

Today [in 2016, its] 34 Member countries span the globe, from North and South America to Europe and Asia-Pacific. They include many of the world’s most advanced countries but also emerging countries like Mexico, Chile and Turkey.”

Excerpt from the text available at . Accessed on January 28, 2016. Occasional linguistic adjustments to fit standard language marked with [ ].

a Which energy sources are represented in the pie chart?

Sugarcane, oil and derivatives, uranium, coal, natural gas, wood and vegetable coal, hydroelectricity and other renewable/nonrenewable sources.

b How much energy comes from renewable/nonrenewable sources in Brazil?



39.4% of the energy comes from renewable sources and 60.6%, from nonrenewable sources.

c How does the Brazilian energy matrix compare to that of other groups in the chart?



The Brazilian energy supply structure uses more renewable sources as it is the only element in the second chart that presents a balance between renewable and nonrenewable source.

d Do these numbers surprise you? Why?



Respostas pessoais.

e In your opinion, why does Brazil use more sugarcane to produce energy than other countries? How does it reflect on the country’s energy matrix?



Professor/a, espera-se que os/as estudantes se apoiem nos conhecimentos históricos para essa reflexão. Segundo o site do Ministério da Agricultura, a cana-de-açúcar, introduzida no período colonial, é uma das principais culturas da economia brasileira. Além disso, o Brasil é o maior produtor de cana, de açúcar e de etanol do mundo. Assim, pode-se concluir que tal abundância é aproveitada na produção de energia, de forma que o país conquista, cada vez mais, o mercado externo com o uso do biocombustível como alternativa energética.

“Sugarcane ethanol and bioelectricity produced from leftover fibers, stalks and leaves make sugarcane the largest source of renewable energy in Brazil.”

Available at




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