University of Oxford Undergraduate Prospectus 2015 entry


Classics, Philosophy, Ancient History and Classical Archaeology



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Classics, Philosophy, Ancient History and Classical Archaeology


A BA in 4 years

UCAS codes: Q800 (Course I) or Q810 (Course II)


Course statistics for 2013 entry


Interviewed: 96%

Successful: 44%

Intake: 123

Entrance requirements


A-levels: AAA with As in Latin and Greek, if taken

Advanced Highers: AA/AAB, with As in Latin and Greek, if taken

IB: 39 (including core points) with 666 at HL and an aggregate of 13 in Latin and Greek, if taken

Or any other equivalent

For Course I, candidates should normally have Latin and/or Greek to A-level, Advanced Higher, or Higher Level in the IB or any other equivalent. Candidates with no experience (or more limited experience) of studying these languages should apply for Course II.

How to apply (see page 118) [Transcriber’s Note: page number of the printed edition. End of note]


Tests: CAT on 5 November 2014

Written Work: Two pieces


Tuition Fees for 2014


Home/EU: £9,000/year

No upfront costs: you can get a loan for the full amount

Grants, bursaries and scholarships available

More on student finance: p 120 [Transcriber’s Note: page number of the printed edition. End of note]


More Information


www.classics.ox.ac.uk

+44 (0) 1865 288372



reception@classics.ox.ac.uk

Oxford Open days


2 and 3 July, and 19 September 2014 ox.ac.uk/opendays

2 May 2014: Joint Classics open day in Cambridge


What is Classics?


Classics is the study of the languages, culture, history and thought of the civilisations of ancient Greece and Rome. It is one of the most varied and interdisciplinary of all subjects; based upon a wide range of options, the course offers the opportunity to study literature (epic, drama, historical writing and much else), the history and archaeology of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean, philosophy (both ancient and modern) and linguistics.

Classics at Oxford


Oxford has the largest Classics depart­ment in the world, with unparalleled teaching, library and museum resources and a range of extra-curricular activities, including performances of Greek plays and various societies.

The Oxford degree involves extensive study of the ancient languages, as many of the texts are read in the original. Some candidates applying to Oxford will be taking A-level (or equivalent) in either Latin or Greek or both, but we also welcome applications for Course II, which enables candidates to learn Greek or Latin from scratch (or, eventually, both).


Fieldwork/international opportunities


Fieldwork is not a requirement in any part of the course, but some under­graduates may receive financial assistance to travel to Italy or Greece, and to participate in archaeological excavations.

A typical weekly timetable


Your time is divided between lectures, tutorials and private study. Most of your work will be in preparation of essays for your tutorials, although the systematic reading of ancient texts, not necessarily aimed at any particular tutorial, also requires a considerable input of time and effort.

What are tutors looking for?


For information about the selection criteria please see: ox.ac.uk/criteria.

Tutors will not expect you to know obscure facts and will not be worried by gaps in your knowledge. They are looking for potential and an enquiring mind.


Related courses


Students interested in this course might also like to consider other Classics or Ancient History courses.

Department websites can be very useful when comparing courses.


Careers


The breadth of subjects studied and skills learned to a high level mean that Classics graduates are in great demand among employers. In recent years a high proportion of classicists have continued on to further study in their subject, or for other professional qualifications especially in law and teaching; graduates have entered occupations including accountancy, the Civil Service, finance, media and publishing. Recent Classics graduates include barristers and a junior desk editor for a publisher of children’s books.

Charles, who graduated in 1980, now works at Felsted School. He says: ‘I have taught Classics in both Independent Senior and Preparatory Schools and have also been a Headmaster. I am currently Academic Registrar and still teach Classics. I hope that I have passed on to my pupils some of the lessons I learned at Oxford through tutorials and seminars – the need for precision, a willingness to think “outside the box”, and a vibrant passion for the Classical World.’

Menai, who graduated in 1997, is now a project manager for Kent County Council. She says: ‘I joined Kingfisher Retail and subsequently WHSmith. I then worked for a charity and finally moved to local government. The training in logical thinking and a questioning approach I developed while studying for my degree have been invaluable. ’

For more information about careers after Oxford, please see p 122 [Transcriber’s Note: page number of the printed edition. End of note].

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LARGEST Classics Faculty in the world


As the largest faculty of Classics in the world Oxford can offer an unparalleled range of undergraduate (and graduate) courses, catering for a huge range of interests.

Course IA


(Latin and Greek, for those who have studied Latin and Greek to A-level or equivalent)

Terms 1–5 Courses


  • Homer’s Iliad

  • Virgil’s Aeneid

  • A special subject in Philosophy (ancient or modern)

  • A classical special subject: literary, historical, archaeological or philological

Work on the Greek and Latin languages

Terms 1–5 Assessments


First University examinations IA:

Ten papers, including four language papers (Latin and Greek)


Terms 6–12 Courses


Choose eight options from more than 80 in the following subjects (no area is compulsory); in most of these subjects it is possible to offer an undergraduate thesis in place of one of the papers:

  • Philosophy (choose up to five), ranging from Plato’s Republic to the Philosophy of mind: for a full range of options see: ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/philosophy.html

  • Greek and Latin literature (choose up to five)

  • Greek and Roman archaeology (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Philology and Linguistics (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Second classical language: Course II students can take up the second classical language if they wish (will count as two papers in the final exam)

Terms 6–12 Assessments


Final University examinations: eight exam subjects taken, with the possibility of offering one paper as a thesis. For some Literature options instead of a three- hour paper, assessment involves the composition of one long essay over a three-week period.

Course IB


(Latin and Greek, for those who have studied only Latin to A-level or equivalent)

Terms 1–5 Courses


  • Homer’s Iliad

  • Virgil’s Aeneid

  • Texts and contexts: integrating literary, archaeological material

  • A special subject in Philosophy (ancient or modern)

  • A classical special subject: literary, historical, archaeological or philological

Work on the Greek and Latin languages

Terms 1–5 Assessments


First University examinations IB:

Ten papers, including four language papers (Greek language work at a less advanced level than IA, Latin at the same level as IA)


Terms 6–12 Courses


Choose eight options from more than 80 in the following subjects (no area is compulsory); in most of these subjects it is possible to offer an undergraduate thesis in place of one of the papers:

  • Greek and Roman history (choose up to five): some are period papers, others topic-based

  • Philosophy (choose up to five), ranging from Plato’s Republic to the Philosophy of mind: for a full range of options see: ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/philosophy.html

  • Greek and Latin literature (choose up to five)

  • Greek and Roman archaeology (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Philology and Linguistics (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Second classical language: Course II students can take up the second classical language if they wish (will count as two papers in the final exam)

Terms 6–12 Assessments


Final University examinations: eight exam subjects taken, with the possibility of offering one paper as a thesis. For some Literature options instead of a three- hour paper, assessment involves the composition of one long essay over a three-week period.

Course IC


(Latin and Greek, for those who have studied only Greek to A-level or equivalent)

Terms 1–5 Courses


  • Homer’s Iliad

  • Virgil’s Aeneid

  • Texts and contexts: integrating literary, archaeological material

  • A special subject in Philosophy (ancient or modern)

  • A classical special subject: literary, historical, archaeological or philological

Work on the Greek and Latin languages

Terms 1–5 Assessments


First University examinations IC:

Ten papers, including four language papers (Latin language work at a less advanced level than IA, Greek at the same level as IA)


Terms 6–12 Courses


Choose eight options from more than 80 in the following subjects (no area is compulsory); in most of these subjects it is possible to offer an undergraduate thesis in place of one of the papers:

  • Greek and Roman history (choose up to five): some are period papers, others topic-based

  • Philosophy (choose up to five), ranging from Plato’s Republic to the Philosophy of mind: for a full range of options see: ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/philosophy.html

  • Greek and Latin literature (choose up to five)

  • Greek and Roman archaeology (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Philology and Linguistics (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Second classical language: Course II students can take up the second classical language if they wish (will count as two papers in the final exam)

Terms 6–12 Assessments


Final University examinations: eight exam subjects taken, with the possibility of offering one paper as a thesis. For some Literature options instead of a three- hour paper, assessment involves the composition of one long essay over a three-week period.

Course IIA


(Latin only, for those who have not studied Greek or Latin to A-level or equivalent)

Terms 1–5 Courses


  • Virgil’s Aeneid

  • Special subjects and Texts and contexts as Course I

  • Work on the Latin language

Terms 1–5 Assessments


First University examinations IIA:

Seven papers, including two language papers


Terms 6–12 Courses


Choose eight options from more than 80 in the following subjects (no area is compulsory); in most of these subjects it is possible to offer an undergraduate thesis in place of one of the papers:

  • Greek and Roman history (choose up to five): some are period papers, others topic-based

  • Philosophy (choose up to five), ranging from Plato’s Republic to the Philosophy of mind: for a full range of options see: ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/philosophy.html

  • Greek and Latin literature (choose up to five)

  • Greek and Roman archaeology (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Philology and Linguistics (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Second classical language: Course II students can take up the second classical language if they wish (will count as two papers in the final exam)

Terms 6–12 Assessments


Final University examinations: As Course I, but Latin only, unless you take optional second classical language

Course IIB


(Greek only, for those who have not studied Latin or Greek to A-level or equivalent)

Terms 1–5 Courses


  • Homer’s Iliad

  • Special subjects and Texts and contexts as Course I

  • Work on the Greek language

Terms 1–5 Assessments


First University examinations IIB:

Seven papers, including two language papers


Terms 6–12 Courses


Choose eight options from more than 80 in the following subjects (no area is compulsory); in most of these subjects it is possible to offer an undergraduate thesis in place of one of the papers:

  • Greek and Roman history (choose up to five): some are period papers, others topic-based

  • Philosophy (choose up to five), ranging from Plato’s Republic to the Philosophy of mind: for a full range of options see: ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/philosophy.html

  • Greek and Latin literature (choose up to five)

  • Greek and Roman archaeology (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Philology and Linguistics (choose up to two, plus a thesis if you wish)

  • Second classical language: Course II students can take up the second classical language if they wish (will count as two papers in the final exam)

Terms 6–12 Assessments


Final University examinations: As Course I, but Greek only, unless you take optional second classical language

Student statement


Classics opens so many doors which a lot of people don’t often realise...it’s the skills you learn whilst studying it that can be applied then to life beyond Oxford and beyond study. Poppy

Listen to more at ox.ac.uk/courses

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