University of Nottingham Economic and Social Research Council


L34111 Researching Public Policy and Management (10 Credits)



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L34111 Researching Public Policy and Management (10 Credits)

Module convenors: Dr Pauline Jas

School of Sociology and Social


Policy, Law and Social Sciences
Building.

Pauline.jas@nottingham.ac.uk

Taught by: Lecture

When taught: Semester two

Wednesday 18 May, 1115 UP Tower Building 9.30 – 17.00. Thursday 19 May, Room A11 Highfields House, 9.30 – 17.00.

Assessment: 2,000 word essay

Assessment submission:

Assessment format:

12 noon, Thursday 9 June 2016. Students need to submit the hard copy to the letterbox located in the glass panel that can be found on the wall at the School of Sociology and Social Policy Reception, B Floor, Law & Social Sciences Building, University Park.

Please follow the university guidelines:



www.nottingham.ac.uk/studentservices/documents/planning-and-preparing-to-write-assignments.pdf

Pre-requisites: None

Module Alison.Haigh@nottingham.ac.uk
administrator:

This module covers some of the main approaches to researching public policy and public management. The module will consider the role of theory in policy-related studies and then explore the pros and cons of the following designs/methods: comparative research (in particular cross-country research), researching networks and governance arrangements, use of performance indicators, elite interviewing and the evaluation of policies and cost-benefit analysis. The module will use case studies to illustrate the designs, methodologies and methods discussed.



Please note, this is an interdisciplinary module that is open to students from across the social sciences. If you have any doubts about whether the course is suitable for your needs or level of study, please contact a course Convenor before registering.



B74MMR Mixed Methods in Health Research (10 Credits)

Module convenors:

Dr Denis Walsh

School of Health Sciences Division of Midwifery, Floor 12, Tower Block, Park Campus denis.walsh@nottingham.ac.uk



Dr Jo Cooper

Trust HQ, 3rd Floor

City Hospital Campus

joanne.cooper3@nuh.nhs.uk


Taught by: Lecture and Seminar

When taught: Thursday 19 May, C1071, QMC South Block, 10.00 – 15.30

Friday 20 May, C1072, QMC South Block, 10.00 – 15.30



Assessment: 2000 word assignment + 500 word reflection

Please check Moodle for submission instructions.
Assessment submission:

Assessment format:


Please follow the university guidelines:

www.nottingham.ac.uk/studentservices/documents/planning-and-preparing-to-write-assignments.pdf

Pre-requisites: M14152 Foundations in Qualitative Research or equivalent to be determined by convenor

Module Lisa.Burr@nottingham.ac.uk
Administrator:

The module is one of a number of modules offered as part of the University’s ESRC doctoral training centre. This module will explore the philosophical and practical foundations for using mixed methods in health research. Mixed methods research will be explored by considering issues around conceptualising and designing mixed methods research to selecting methods, analysing and interpreting data and reporting findings. In common with the other advanced modules offered by the ESRC DTC the module is offered as a two day workshop with additional guided reading and work.

Please note, this is an interdisciplinary module that is open to students from across the social sciences. If you have any doubts about whether the course is suitable for your needs or level of study, please contact a course Convenor before registering.


Q34724 Corpus Linguistics (10 Credits)




Module To be confirmed

convenors:

School of English

A Floor, Trent Building, Park Campus

Taught by: Lecture and workshop

When taught: Monday 18 April 2016, 9am – 2pm in LASS A25 Thursday 21 April 2016, 12noon – 5pm in LASS A25

2000 word assignment
Assessment:

Assessment submission:

Assessment format:

Friday 10 June 2016 by 14.00. Please submit two hard copies via the assessment box in the School of English corridor, outside A95 Trent Building.



Please follow the School’s guidelines:

https://workspace.nottingham.ac.uk/display/english/Producing+Asse ssed+Coursework

Pre-requisites: M14151 Research Design, Practice & Ethics, or M14150 Philosophy of Research/Social Science, or equivalent as judged by the convenor

Module liz.dennis@nottingham.ac.uk

administrator:

The module is one of a number of modules offered as part of the University’s ESRC doctoral training centre. Corpus linguistics provides methods for the study of collections of electronic texts (written texts, including literary texts, material from the internet, transcripts of spoken language, etc.). This module will explore fundamental methods in corpus linguistics, introduce basic concepts and give students the opportunity to complete hands-on tasks in the computer lab using corpus software such as WordSmith Tools. In common with the other advanced modules offered by the ESRC DTC the module is offered as a two-day workshop with additional guided reading and work.



Please note, this is an interdisciplinary module that is open to students from across the social sciences. If you have any doubts about whether the course is suitable for your needs or level of study, please contact the course convenor before registering.



L34095, L34115 Doing Ethnography (10 Credits)

Module convenors:
Dr Stephen Timmons (L34115)


Dr Samuel Okyere (L34095)

School of Sociology and Social Policy, Law and Social Sciences Building. Samuel.Okyere@nottingham.ac.u k

Nottingham University Business School stephen.timmons@nottingham.ac. uk

Taught by: Lecture and workshops

When taught: Please note that courses will be filled depending on demand commencing with L34095

L34095: Monday 6 and Tuesday 7 June 9.30 – 17.00, D137 Portland Building.

Assessment: 2,000 word essay

L34115: Thursday 2 and Friday 3 June, 09.30 – 17.00, Room TBC



Assessment submission:
Please follow the university guidelines:

www.nottingham.ac.uk/studentservices/documents/planning-and-preparing-to-write-assignments.pdf


Assessment format:

L34095: Submission deadline 12 noon, Thursday 28 June 2016. Students need to submit the hard copy to the letterbox located in the glass panel that can be found on the wall at the School of Sociology and Social Policy Reception, B Floor, Law & Social Sciences Building, University Park.

L34115: Essay submission deadline to be confirmed. Please submit to Andrea Tomlinson, A73 Postgraduate Office, North Business School.


Pre-requisites: M14152 Foundations in Qualitative Methods or equivalent to be determined by the convenor.

Module

administrators:

L34095:

Alison.Haigh@nottingham.ac.uk

L34115:

Amanda.Shacklock@nottingham.a c.uk

This module considers in detail 'ethnography' as a qualitative research method. It explores the underlying principles and practices of the approach, which, broadly speaking, involves studying people 'at first hand', in detail, usually at length and in the context in which they live, work, play etc. It will explore:

  • Key concepts and approaches

  • Important ethnographic studies

  • Critiques, strengths and weaknesses

  • Designing and planning your own ethnographic study.

Students will experience a range of learning methods including lectures, workshops, film viewings, student presentations and group work. The course will explore the historic development of the ethnographic tradition from its inception in the field of anthropology (e.g. Malinowski), early use in sociology (including the Chicago School's research into urban sociology). It will consider the contested terrain of defining what constitutes ethnographic research and how it has been conceptualised and theorised, paying particular attention to researcher subjectivity and how this impacts 'hands-on' research. Data-collection methods including interviewing, participant observation, text collection and photography will be explored in great detail, and students will be required to design a study with the above considerations in mind.



Please note, this is an interdisciplinary module that is open to students from across the social sciences. If you have any doubts about whether the course is suitable for your needs or level of study, please contact a course Convenor before registering.




M14160 Intermediate Quantitative Analysis (10 Credits)

Module convenor: Dr Anja Neundorf

School of Politics & International Relations


Room C17 Law & Social Sciences Building
anja.neundorf@nottingham.ac.uk

Taught by: Seminars and Computer Lab

When taught: Thursday 2 and Friday 3 June 2016

Venues to be confirmed via moodle and the course handbook



Assessment: 2000 word assignment

Assessment submission:

Assessment format:

Submission deadline Thursday 23 June 2016. Coursework should be submitted to the School of Politics and International Relations, Law & Social Sciences Building, University Park.

Please follow the university guidelines:



www.nottingham.ac.uk/studentservices/documents/planning-and-preparing-to-write-assignments.pdf

Pre-requisites: M14153 Fundamentals of Quantitative Analysis or equivalent to be determined by convenor. Stata working knowledge required.

Module Carole.yates@nottingham.ac.uk
administrator:

Categorical dependent variables such as turnout (yes, no), educational attainment (GCSE, A-levels, degree), or opinions measured using Likert scales (e.g. 1=absolutely disagree; 5=absolutely agree) are very common in research and, consequently, models for analysing these variables are now standard research tools.



This is a two-day course that will introduce students to specific issues of quantitative data analysis using such non-continues dependent variables. The lecture component of the module will explore the most common issues that arise when examining categorical data. This includes different forms of choice models such as binary logit models, ordinal logit models, as well as multinomial logit models. As part of the statistical theory, we will also cover maximum likelihood estimation.

By the end of this two-day course, students will be able to read articles that employ such logit models. In addition, they will be able to use these models in their own research. You can only learn statistics by doing statistics. This is why this module includes a laboratory component, where you will learn to apply these techniques to the analysis of discipline specific data. The practical skills include hands-on analysis of categorical data in Stata, as well as extensive training in the interpretation of logit results. Using a range

of the most popular survey data sets including the British Election Study and the European Social Survey.

The module should provide the skills necessary to take one or more survey data sets, and conduct the data management and analysis necessary to conduct a full-scale research project.

Your coursework assignment will be based on the need to actually implement these methods with real data. Thus, your goal will be to apply one of the methods you will have learnt on these data to answer questions about whether some variable X affect a categorical dependent variable Y.



Please note, this is an interdisciplinary module that is open to students from across the social sciences. If you have any doubts about whether the course is suitable for your needs or level of study, please contact a course Convenor before registering


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