Unit Plan Brave New World By Aldous Huxley



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Unit Plan
Brave New World

By Aldous Huxley

Chapters 16-18

Will Schaub

SED 525EN

Fall 2008

Prof. Kathleen Rowlands

Table of Contents
1. Unit Introduction p. 3

2. Unit Planning Overview p. 6

3. BNW Lesson Plan Day 1 p. 10

4. BNW Lesson Plan Day 3 p. 15

5. BNW Lesson Plan Day 4 p. 20

6. BNW Lesson Plan Day 6 p. 23

7. BNW Lesson Plan Day 9 p. 28

8. Unit Assessment Tools p. 32

8. Final Written Assessment and Rubric p. 33

9. Unit Planning Commentary p. 34

Unit Plan Introduction

Course: 12th Grade English- Modern Literature

Unit Topic: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley: Chapters 16-18
Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, is the centerpiece of the 12th Grade Modern Literature course I teach at John Francis Polytechnic High School. We operate on a block schedule in which 16 weeks of instruction are compressed into eight weeks: 95-minute classes, five days a week. The course is supplemented with short stories (e.g. “The Veldt” by Ray Bradbury), poetry, and critical viewings of films and television episodes reflecting the themes identified and discussed in Brave New World. This two-week unit focuses on the final three chapters (16-18).
This unit addresses the following English-Language Area Content Standards for California Public Schools:

Reading 2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author's arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.
Literary Response and Analysis 3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim.
Writing 1.3 Structure ideas and arguments in a sustained, persuasive, and sophisticated way and support them with precise and relevant examples.
Speaking Applications 2.3 Deliver oral responses to literature.

Unit Objectives:


• When asked about themes debated in Chapter 16, SWBAT discuss the role of art, history, liberty, and happiness in society.

• When discussing societal values, SWBAT compare and contrast the World State to our society.

• When assigned a theme from the text, SWBAT cite three pieces of textual evidence where the theme is discussed,

• In making an oral argument, SWBAT make a persuasive case demonstrating knowledge of ethos, pathos, and/or logos.

• In making a movie poster for Brave New World, SWBAT demonstrate understanding of theme, mood, and genre in their artistic decisions.

• When asked Huxley’s social commentary in BNW, SWBAT state a position and support it with textual examples.

• SWBAT explain Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and identify examples in the text BNW.

• SWBAT relate themes from BNW to the film Gattaca.

• When asked about social commentaries in BNW, SWBAT identify multiple examples and reference in text.

• SWBAT display knowledge of BNW in a short persuasive essay from the POV of a character in the text.


The unit provides students with integrated experiences on all four areas of English-Language Arts: Reading, Writing, Talking and Listening. It frames instruction by first establishing what the students already know in these targeted areas. On day one the students are asked to define key terms and identify themes presented in the text. This will inform me where we should begin the discussion of theme and social commentary.
We do not have extensive technology available to us in our classroom. Specifically, we have no computer projector, so PowerPoint presentations are impossible. We do, however, have a television and a DVD player so we can view scenes from the film Brave New World and other films with relevant content. Titles I’ve identified for potential viewing include The Island, Gattica, and Total Recall. I plan to have the students spend one class designing and constructing a movie poster for Brave New World as a way to use Gardner’s multiple intelligences to understand the themes of the book and concepts such as tone, mood, symbolism, and imagery.
Group work, pair sharing, class discussion, debate, in-class and prepared writing will be combined to allow all students to participate and access the curriculum. Students are asked to show knowledge of the material, and to analyze, discuss, evaluate, and make personal connections to the themes presented in the book to address the higher intelligences in Bloom’s Taxonomy.
The lessons are designed to connect written responses to the reading, incorporating appropriate scaffolding and modeling. Group work and pair sharing will be used to give students practice crystallizing and articulating their thoughts as well as the opportunity to listen and learn from their classmates. Written, oral, and artistic evaluations will assess the students’ understanding. The summative assessment will be an in-class written work designed to allow me to determine the students’ proficiency in each of the targeted Content Standards. To properly respond to the prompt, the students will need to understand the themes presented in the book and the social commentary Huxley is making. They will also need to demonstrate knowledge of persuasive techniques (ethos, pathos, logos), speaker, audience, and purpose in crafting their persuasive argument.

Name: Will Schaub
Unit Plan Overview
Unit Topic: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Chapters 16-18 Course: 12th Grade English- Modern Literature
Standards addressed:

Reading 2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author's arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.

Literary Response and Analysis 3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim.

Writing 1.3 Structure ideas and arguments in a sustained, persuasive, and sophisticated way and support them with precise and relevant examples.



Speaking Applications 2.3 Deliver oral responses to literature.





Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Objectives


When asked about themes debated in Chapter 16, SWBAT discuss the role of art, history, liberty, and happiness in society.

When discussing societal values, SWBAT compare and contrast the World State to our society.

When assigned a theme from the text, SWBAT cite three pieces of textual evidence where the theme is discussed,

In making an oral argument, SWBAT make a persuasive case demonstrating knowledge of ethos, pathos, and/or logos.

In making a movie poster for Brave New World, SWBAT demonstrate understanding of theme, mood, and genre in their artistic decisions.

Summary of Student Activities


1) Define Key Terms: Cyprus Experiment, Malthusian Theory, Iceberg Model, and Violent Passion Surrogate (VPS).
2) Fill in definitions in New Vocabulary sheet
3) Complete Dialectical Graphic Organizer in regards to social debate between Mustapha Mond and John the Savage.

1) Pair share about dialectical organizer.
2) Quickwrite: “What makes you happy?”
3) Venn diagram: Source of Happiness. BNW vs. Our Society.

1) Lit Circles- Chapter 16.
2) Class discussion about lit circle findings.
3) Cite 3 references in the text to one theme from the list.

1) Quickwrite: “How does society condition us?”
2) Discuss with class. List points on board.
3) Group work: BNW Survivor. In Lit Groups, each member plays a character: Bernard, Lenina, Helmholtz, John, or Linda. One gets sent to Iceland. Each argues to stay. Take vote. Share results and reasoning.

1) Class discussion of movie poster components.
2) Groups make movie poster for BNW with consideration to: genre, audience, tone, mood, imagery, hook, tag line, etc.
3) Present posters to class

Assessment


Graphic Organizer will be checked.

Read quickwrites and check Venn diagram to establish baseline understanding of concepts.

Lit circle accountability forms will be collected and reviewed for understanding of the chapter.

Informal assessment of persuasive techniques in group work.

Assessment of posters and design-making process as presented to class.






Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

Day 10

Objectives


When asked Huxley’s social commentary in BNW, SWBAT state a position and support it with textual examples.

SWBAT explain Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and identify examples in the text BNW.

SWBAT relate themes from BNW to the film Gattaca.

When asked about social commentaries in BNW, SWBAT identify multiple examples and reference in text.

SWBAT display knowledge of BNW in a short persuasive essay from the POV of a character in the text.

Summary of Student Activities


1) Who Said It? Handout.
2) Discuss as class
3) Vocabulary Bingo

1) Ethos, Pathos, & Logos Handout

- personal definition

- class definition

- example in text


2) Find your own examples
3) John v. Mustapha Mond

- study exchange on p. 240

- Ethos, Pathos, Logos? Where?


1) Preview key terms from film

- DNA


- Genetic code

- Genetic screening

- Genetic engineering
2) Screen Gattaca for the students
3) Gattaca discussion questions (if time allows)


1) Discuss Gattaca, relate to BNW. Hand in questions.
2) Jigsaw: Huxley’s Social Commentaries

• Art/Literature

• Independent Thought

• God/Religion

• Individual vs. Society

• Nature of Happiness



1) Review written assessment prompt and rubric
2) Timed writing assessment
3) Final thoughts on BNW

Assessment


Handout will be collected and checked for understanding.

Short response: who wins the debate on p. 240? Why? (See if students identify ethos, pathos, logos or if they just state opinion.)

Gattaca discussion questions to be completed as homework and handed in.

Informal assessment of discussion in expert groups and home groups.

Written assessment will be evaluated for content and execution. (See rubric.)


DAILY LESSON PLAN
Teacher’s Name: Will Schaub Class/Period: Modern Literature, Period 2

Unit: BNW Chapters 16-18, Day 1 Date: 12-8-08

Agenda: 1) Define Key Terms, 2) Vocabulary List, 3) Dialectical Organizer

California Content Standards: Literary Response and Analysis 3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim. Reading 1.0 Students apply knowledge of word origins to determine the meaning of new words encountered in reading materials and use those words accurately.

Objectives: When asked about the themes debated in Chapter 16 of Brave New World, SWBAT discuss the role of art, history, liberty, and happiness in society.

Materials Needed: Overhead projector, transparency, BNW, New Vocabulary handout,

Activities:

Time

Teacher Procedures

Student Responsibilities

15 min.

On the overhead projector, write the key terms Cyprus Experiment, Malthusian Theory, Iceberg Model, and Violent Passion Surrogate. Have students locate where each term is found in these chapters. Guide class discussion and write agreed upon definitions and page numbers on the transparency.

Students will look up the key terms in their texts and discuss definitions and significance. They will copy the class definitions and page numbers from the transparency.

30 min.

Hand out New Vocabulary list. Have students write in their own definitions to all words they’re familiar with. For the remaining words (there will be plenty) they can use dictionaries, consult with each other, whatever they need to understand the meaning. (Note: no complicated dictionary definitions.)

Students will fill in their own definitions to all words they are familiar with. For the remaining words, they will consult with each other and look in the dictionary to determine meaning.

15 min.

Go over entire list to ensure that students have correct definitions and understandings of all new vocabulary words. (40 in all.)

Students will fill in any remaining definitions they weren’t able to find, make additions, corrections, and ask any questions about specific words.

30 min.

Model on the overhead projector how to make a Dialectical Organizer for the themes debated by Mustapha Mond and John in Chapter 16. Have them use their texts to go through the chapter and identify the issues debated by the two characters. Model a few for them then have them continue on their own. (Themes include: appreciation of history, heroism, liberty, truth, happiness, social stability, drama, art, individual rights, societal responsibility, science, and equality.) The two agree on almost nothing. The students should be able to identify some of these disagreements.

Students will make a Dialectical Organizer on their paper contrasting the positions taken in Chapter 16 by Mustapha Mond and John. They’ll copy the first few examples from the overhead projector, then, using their books, they will look for further examples themselves.



Homework: Complete the Dialectical Organizer for Chapter 16 and turn in. Graded on a 10 point scale.
Assessment or Evaluation: I’ll check their organizers for comprehension and ability to identify the issues presented in the chapter. We’ll revisit the vocabulary words next week in Vocabulary Bingo.
Lesson Plan Commentary/Reflection: This will be our fifth week on Brave New World, and we’ve been working on understanding the underlying message the whole time. I hope the students will be able to identify the issues debated in the chapter. The social and philosophical discussion is very straightforward and blatant in Chapters 16 and 17, and the students should be able to identify what the issues are and how the two characters feel. What continues to be a challenge for them is identifying what Huxley’s greater point is. A few of the students have identified that the book is speculating about the future of our own society but most have not. 31 of my 33 students are English Language Learners and for many of them simply deciphering the plot is a challenge.

BNW Vocabulary List


Word

Definition

Callow




Geniality




Viviparous




Effusive




Prodigious




Heinous




Maudlin




Portentous




Furtive




Heretical




Indissolubly




Cordiality




Tremulous




Abstemious




Atonement




Reparation




Quaff




Parody




Paroxysm




Abjectly




Magnanimity




Resonance




Innocuous




Surreptitious




Cadge




Imperious




Pallid




Soliloquize




Indefatigably




Sibilant




Deferential




Rudimentary




Sententious




Florid




Zealous




Porous




Sultry




Duly




Apoplectic




Curtly




Suffuse




Tactile




Squalid




Inscrutable




Incongruous




Truculent




Crevice




Scamper




Stigma





DAILY LESSON PLAN
Teacher’s Name: Will Schaub Class/Period: Modern Literature, Period 2

Unit: BNW Chapters 16-18, Day 3 Date: 12-10-08

Agenda: 1) Lit Circles Chapter 16, 2) Class Discussion, 3) Citing Themes in Text

California Content Standards: Reading 2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author’s arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.

Objectives: When assigned a theme in Brave New World, SWBAT cite three pieces of textual evidence where the theme is discussed.

Materials Needed: BNW, Lit Circle Accountability Forms, Paper & Pen

Activities:

Time

Teacher Procedures

Student Responsibilities

40 min.

Have students get into their Lit Circles to discuss Chapter 16 as per their prepared roles. Remind them that they each must fill out their portion of the Accountability Form and/or attach their work. (This is a dense chapter with many issues discussed.) Circulate during group work to assess understanding, keep students on task, and answer any questions.

Students will get into their Lit Circles and discuss Chapter 16 from the point of view of the roles they’ve prepared. They will each fill in their individual portions of the Accountability Form and each group will answer the group questions on the form. They will attach any work to the form as necessary.

20 min.

Lead the class in a discussion of the Lit Circle findings. Have individual circles share the questions the Director brought in. What did they learn? Which passages were identified? What was their significance? (With prodding, these conversations can be very enlightening with the students doing virtually all of the intellectual work.) Guide students in connecting these themes to Huxley’s commentary. What’s it all mean?

The Lit Circles will share the issues discussed in their groups and what was discovered. (The intellectual debate of the book comes to a head in Chapters 16 and 17. There may be considerable debate about the positions put forth by the characters in these chapters.) They will hand in all their work.

30 min.

While still in their lit circles, have students identify passages relating to specific themes- each group member with a different theme. Discussion Directors: history, Passage Masters: happiness, Connectors: social stability, Illustrators: art, Graphic Designers: equality. Have them cite the passage and page number. Encourage them to work independently.

Students will use their texts to find specific passages dealing with their given topic. They will need to cite the page number and beginning and ending of the passage. They are to work alone and hand in their papers before leaving.



Homework: Read and take notes on Chapter 17.
Assessment or Evaluation: I’ll check their Lit Circle Accountability Forms. 5 points for everyone who was present and participated. I’ll also check their citing work. 5 points if completed. Each of these pieces of work will inform me on their understanding of the chapter and the issues being discussed by the characters.
Lesson Plan Commentary/Reflection: Chapters 16 and 17 are quite dense. Huxley really lays out his arguments here and it’s important to me that the students understand not only what’s happening but why Huxley bothered to write the book. I’ve had good success thus far with the lit circles. The accountability form seems to be an effective tool to encourage them to do the reading and discuss the significance. The citing work is an attempt to make them go back and study the text. The concept of rereading material still seems like a foreign concept to my kids. This exercise makes them reread the passages and analyze them for meaning.

Literature Circles
Group #: Date:
Book:
Chapter(s):
Discussion Director

Name:____________________

List at least 2 open-ended questions about today’s reading. Discuss in the group.

Passage Master

Name:_____________________

Identify at least 1 passage by page # and opening and closing words from today’s reading. Why’d you pick it? Discuss in the group.
Connector

Name:_____________________

Make at least 1 connection between today’s reading and your own life. Discuss in the group.


Illustrator

Name:______________________

Share a visual you’ve found or created that relates to today’s reading. Share it with the group. Attach it to this sheet to hand in.

Graphic Designer

Name:______________________

Identify the major concepts from today’s reading. Present them to the group in a graphic (visual) design. Discuss with the group. Attach it to this sheet to hand in.
Things that went well:

Things we need help with:

Members who were absent or did not participate:


On a scale of 0-5 points, our group should receive:_____ Why?
All group members must sign:

1)_________________________

2)_________________________
3)_________________________
4)_________________________
5)_________________________


DAILY LESSON PLAN
Teacher’s Name: Will Schaub Class/Period: Modern Literature, Period 2

Unit: BNW Chapters 16-18, Day 4 Date: 12-11-08

Agenda: 1) Journal – quickwrite, 2) Class Discussion, 3) BNW Survivor, 4) Discuss who won. Why?

California Content Standards: Literary Response and Analysis 3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim. Speaking Applications 2.3 Deliver oral responses to literature.

Objectives: When speaking about Brave New World, SWBAT make a persuasive case demonstrating knowledge of ethos, pathos, and logos.

Materials Needed: Journals, BNW, Paper & Pen

Activities:

Time

Teacher Procedures

Student Responsibilities

15 min.

Have students quickwrite in their journals about the prompt: How does society condition us?

Students will respond to the prompt in their journals.

15 min.

Have student share their thoughts with the class. (We’ve discussed conditioning in BNW before so they should have something to say. If students are initially shy, try asking how many boys wear dresses. Why not?) List the points on the board.

Students will share their thoughts about aspects of our society that condition our behaviors.

40 min.

Introduce class to BNW Survivor. Have students get into their lit groups. The scenario is that Mustapha Mond is sending one character to Iceland and the group must vote which character goes. Each student in the group will play the role of Bernard, Lenina, John, Helmholtz, or Linda. Each has a turn to argue their case for staying. When each character has spoken, they vote by secret ballot to see who’s exiled.

Students get into their groups and pick which character they will play. All 5 characters must be represented. They have 10 minutes to prepare their argument, then each character has 5 minutes to make his or her case for staying in society. After each character has spoken, they’ll take a vote by secret ballot to see who’s voted out of society.

20 min.

Poll the groups to see who was exiled. Is it the same character in each group? Why did people vote the way they did? Did some students make good use of ethos, pathos, and logos?

Groups will report which character was voted out of society and why. They’ll offer their rationale for their voting and discover if there were particular arguing techniques that were successful.



Homework: Bring any art supplies, magazines, etc. that you may want for tomorrow’s poster-making activity.
Assessment or Evaluation: Assessment of students’ persuasive techniques will be informal observation. I’ll collect the students’ writing journals at the end of the semester and students will get 5 participation points for every journal entry completed.
Lesson Plan Commentary/Reflection: I’m trying to help the students connect the issues in BNW to their own life experience. I’ve heard them say things like, “In the book, they don’t even know about God,” with no inkling that a belief in God could be considered a conditioned belief. This is also an extension of my semester-long effort to get them to see that what we’re studying in the classroom is not hermetically sealed from the real world. I find an article or two a week in the newspaper dealing with something we’ve studied to try to bridge the chasm between their world and the world of academia. The Survivor game should be fun (I’ve never tried it before), and I hope it will help them to continue to develop their persuasive skills. We’ve covered ethos, pathos, and logos at the beginning of the term, so they should be familiar with the terms and what they mean. The final writing assessment will require them to demonstrate knowledge of these techniques, so I’m trying to give them some opportunities to develop these skills.

DAILY LESSON PLAN
Teacher’s Name: Will Schaub Class/Period: Modern Literature, Period 2

Unit: BNW Chapters 16-18, Day 6 Date: 12-15-08

Agenda: 1) Who Said It? handout, 2) Class Review, 3) Vocabulary Bingo

California Content Standards: Reading 2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author’s arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.

Reading 1.0 Students apply knowledge of word origins to determine the meaning of new words encountered in reading materials and use those words accurately.

Objectives: When discussing social issues presented in Brave New World, SWBAT cite examples debated by Mustapha Mond and John the savage.

Materials Needed: Who Said It? handout, BNW, Vocabulary Bingo sheet, New Vocabulary List

Activities:

Time

Teacher Procedures

Student Responsibilities

45 min.

Hand out the sheet Who Said It? Have students work individually to identify the speaker for each quote, note the page number, and state the significance. (All the quotes are from Chapters 16-18, but this will probably be a challenge for many students.)

Students will use their texts to identify the speaker for each quote, cite the page number, and state the significance of the quote.

15 min.

When the students have completed their sheets, go over the list and identify the speakers and importance of each quote. (These are the big themes of the book. If they can speak intelligently on this, they’ll be prepared for the final writing assessment.)

Students will share their thoughts about the identities of the speakers and the significance of each quote.

30 min.

Hand out the Vocabulary Bingo sheet. Have the students take out their vocabulary list and randomly write one definition in each of the 24 open squares on their Bingo sheet. They can pick whatever 24 definitions they want and put them in any squares. When they’ve finished, read aloud a word from the vocabulary list and write it on the board. If a student has the definition for that word on their sheet, they’ll mark it. Continue reading words aloud and writing them on the board until someone gets a row or a column filled. Check their sheet against the list on the board to make sure they actually have Bingo. (Many of the words are challenging. They can use their vocabulary list if you want.)

Students will randomly fill definitions from their vocabulary list into the 24 open squares on their Bingo sheets. They can pick any 24 definitions they want and write them in whatever squares they want. When they hear a word from the vocabulary list, they’ll check to see if they have the definition on their Bingo sheet. If they do, they’ll mark it. When they have a row or a column filled (or a diagonal), they win.



Homework: Read Chapter 18.
Assessment or Evaluation: The Who Said It handout will be collected and checked for understanding. 10 points, if completed.
Lesson Plan Commentary/Reflection: The handout is another attempt to make the students reread the material and analyze its meaning. It’s a rather laborious process, and 10 quotes is a lot for them to comment on, but if I assign it as homework only a handful of my students would do it. If they can identify the significance of these quotes, the final writing assessment should be a breeze for them. The vocabulary Bingo is just a fun way to make them look at those words again. Almost all of my students are English Learners and their academic language is not strong. I don’t expect them to incorporate many of these words into their daily dialogue, but they should be exposed to them and have some idea about their meaning. I plan to offer homework passes to individual winners as motivation for them to participate.

Who Said It?

Brave New World

Chapters 16-18
For each of the following quotes you must:

Identify the speaker.

Find it in the text and cite the page number.

Explain what it means and why it’s significant.


1) “Beauty’s attractive, and we don’t want people to be attracted by old things. We want them to like the new ones.”
2) “But that’s the price we have to pay for stability. You’ve got to choose between happiness and what people used to call high art.”
3) “Why don’t you make everybody and Alpha Double Plus while you’re at it?”
4) “You cannot pour upper-caste champagne-surrogate onto lower-caste bottles. It’s obvious theoretically. But it has also been proved in actual practice. The result of the Cyprus experiment was convincing.”
5) “He’s being sent to an island. That’s to say, he’s being sent to a place where he’ll meet the most interesting wet of men and women to be found anywhere in the world.”
6) “But God’s the reason for everything noble and fine and heroic.”
7) “In a properly organized society like ours, nobody has any opportunities for being noble or heroic. Conditions have got to be thoroughly unstable before the occasion can arise.”
8) “Anyone can be virtuous now. You can carry at least half your morality about in a bottle. Christianity without tears- that’s what soma is.”
9) “I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness, I want sin.”
10) “I shall go away tomorrow too. Anywhere. I don’t care. So long as I can be alone.”

VOCABULARY BINGO


B

I

N

G

O












































































DAILY LESSON PLAN
Teacher’s Name: Will Schaub Class/Period: Modern Literature, Period 2

Unit: BNW Chapters 16-18, Day 9 Date: 12-18-08

Agenda: 1) Gattaca questions, 2) Expert groups, 3) Home groups, 4) Class discussion

California Content Standards: Literary Response and Analysis 3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim.

Objectives: When asked about social commentary in Brave New World, SWBAT identify multiple examples and reference the text.

Materials Needed: Gattaca questions, BNW

Activities:

Time

Teacher Procedures

Student Responsibilities

15 min.

Have the students get out their Gattaca movie questions and review them as a class. What did they get out of the movie? Can they relate it to the themes presented in BNW?

Students will share their responses to the Gattaca questions. They’ll discuss their opinions about the message of the movie and cite specific details from the film to support their positions.

30 min.

Have students get into a Jigsaw study group. Assign all Discussion Directors the expert group looking at Art & Literature, Passage Masters: Independent Thought, Connectors: God & Religion, Illustrators: Individuals vs. Society, and Graphic Designers: Happiness. Have each expert group gather together with their texts to study their topics in Chapters 16-18. They’ll have 30 minutes to identify passages dealing with their topic, what Huxley is saying, and discuss how to teach it to their home groups.

Students will break into five expert groups discussing the topics: Art & Literature, Independent Thought, God & Religion, Individuals vs. Society, and Happiness. They’ll research their topic together, identifying passages in the text where it’s discussed, what Huxley’s intention is, and how to teach their topic to their home teams.

30 min.

Have students reassemble in their Lit Circle groups, which should have a member from each of the expert groups. Instruct them to take turns teaching their home group about the topic they studied with their expert groups. They won’t have the prompt, but you can advise them that this is very pertinent to the writing they’ll have to do tomorrow.

Students will reconfigure into their home lit circle groups. They’ll take turns teaching the group what they’ve studied in their expert groups. They’ll want to take notes to use in their final writing assessment tomorrow.

15 min.

Ask the class what they’ve learned about these topics. Remind them that tomorrow will be an in class writing assignment that will draw on everything we’ve studied in Brave New World. Ask students to list some topics that we’ve covered. Write the list on the board.

Students will discuss the themes from the expert groups and what was learned. They’ll brainstorm themes and topics discussed thus far in Brave New World. They’ll copy to list that is compiled on the board.



Homework: Review Brave New World text and all notes.
Assessment or Evaluation: I’ll check the Gattaca questions. 10 points, if completed. I’ll informally assess the discussion in the expert and home groups. Tomorrow’s writing assignment will reveal what they know and what I could have taught better.
Lesson Plan Commentary/Reflection: It’s a very collaborative day. The Jigsaw should be a good way to cover each topic in detail if the students take the work seriously. I am concerned that we’re getting close to the holidays and my students sometimes decide to check out early. The writing assessment is a fairly hefty chunk of their grade though, and their last chance to improve their score. The final assessment isn’t a particularly intimidating prompt, so if they’ve done the reading and paid attention in class, they should be fine.

Gattaca Discussion Questions
1) What type of “head start” do the people in the movie give to their unborn children?
2) How is discrimination portrayed in the movie? Who is discriminated against and why? How is it like our own society? How is it different?
3) There are currently tests to genetically screen patients for a predisposition for diseases such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. The list is growing rapidly. What are the potential benefits from this genetic screening? What are the potential problems?
4) What message does the movie send about genetic profiling?
5) What message does the movie send about people with disabilities?
6) How do the themes explored in Gattaca relate to those in Brave New World? Is there a similar message? If so, what is it?

Unit Evaluation Tools:
• Mustapha Mond/John the Savage Dialectical Concept Map

• Happiness Quickwrite

• Happiness Venn Diagram

• Chapter 16 Literature Circle Accountability Form

• Movie Poster and Presentation

• Who Said It? – Handout

• Short Written Response to p. 240

Gattaca Discussion Questions

• Final Written Assessment
For a discussion of the formative and summative assessment tools listed above, please see the Unit Plan Commentary.
Brave New World Writing Assignment
Having completed Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, reflect on the themes we’ve discussed in considering the following hypothetical exchange:
Before leaving society to live in the lighthouse, John (the Savage) goes to Lenina and attempts to convince her to join him.
Assignment: Write a short (1-2 page) narrative from either John’s or Lenina’s POV.

Why does John want to leave society? Why does he want Lenina to go with him? How will he convince her to go? Does she want to join him? Why or why not? Will she convince him to stay? If so, how?


Some points you might consider in your argument are your character’s position on:
Religion

• Truth


• Freedom

• Independent thought

• Community responsibility

• Happiness

• Security and stability

• Personal feelings for the other


You may use your text if you wish.



REQUIREMENTS

MAX POINTS

YOUR POINTS


Presents a persuasive argument.


10





Use of Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos.


10





Accurately reflects character’s world view.


10





Demonstrates knowledge of character’s personal history.


10




Demonstrates knowledge of speaker, audience, and purpose.


10





MUGS (Mechanic, Usage, Grammar, & Syntax)


10





TOTAL


60





You have 45 minutes. Staple this sheet to your writing and hand it in.

Unit Planning Commentary

Brave New World, Chapters 16-18
The central focus of this unit is to encourage my students to identify the themes and social issues presented by the characters in the text and to make a reasoned assumption about the commentary Huxley is making. Brave New World is clearly a cautionary warning about the consequences our society may be heading toward as a result of moral decay, the breakdown of the family unit, an overdependence on science and technology, and the gradual replacement of thought provoking art with brainless diversions. It also sounds a clear warning bell against the perils of communism and the subordination of individuals’ rights. For my particular students, however, none of this is self-evident. They’ve explained to me that they read literally and don’t like to analyze. Although I sympathize with them, my students need to know that every author writes for a purpose and it’s our job to find meaning in the text.

The unit starts with the pre-reading activities of defining key terms and new vocabulary words. The complexity of discussion increases as we begin to identify the themes discussed in the text and attempt to relate them to our experience in our own society. Work in the Literature Circles and analysis of specific passages begins to teach to the higher intelligences in Bloom’s Taxonomy. In Days 3,6, and 9, I’ve scheduled activities that require the students to re-read the text and analyze specific passages for significance. To accommodate students with differing strengths in Gardner’s multiple intelligences, I’ve scheduled activities that allow students to demonstrate understanding using the visual arts and oral presentations. I’ve scheduled films, graphic organizers, group work, and games to give students of various learning styles access to the material. Nearly all of my students are English Learners so I’ve scheduled lessons to introduce new vocabulary words and engaging ways to become more familiar with academic language. I spend time everyday explaining instructions and material as thoroughly as I can to ensure that all of my students understand.



The assessment tools incorporated into this unit plan provide my students a variety of ways to demonstrate understanding of the material. For the visual learners there are Dialectical Organizers and Venn Diagrams. For the visual artistic learners there is the movie poster and the illustration and graphic design built in to the Literature Circle Accountability Form. For my students with strength in logic and analysis there are quickwrites about the nature of happiness and societal conditioning. And for the linguistic learners there are written responses. The final writing assessment may prove a challenge to some of my English Learners, but I’ve provided many other assessment tools for them to demonstrate their content knowledge. The prompt is not overly academic and should not prove to be too intimidating for them. I specifically chose content standards for this unit that would address reading, writing, speaking, and listening, and I feel that I’ve designed lessons that teach to each of these areas.





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