Umass amherst film & Video Course Guide



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UMASS AMHERST Film & Video Course Guide
Fall 2013
(Updated 03/07/2013)
Note: This guide is a work-in-progress. Course info may be subject to change.

ANTHRO 106—CULTURE THROUGH FILM
Kevin Anderson (but could change) Gen. Ed: G/SB

Lecture: M 6:00 – 9:00PM Cap: 264

With a discussion section (on Spire)

Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.  Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6

ANTHRO 306— VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Instructor: Jackie Urla Gen. Ed: G/SB

Lecture: Tu/Th 11:15AM-12:30PM Cap:


Lab: W 4 – 6PM

This course examines the politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the moving image.  We will be critically examining how information about cultural diversity is conveyed through visual images and we will examine the historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that have shaped these images.  Students will get an overview of the evolution of ethnographic film, and look at recent examples by minority artists and native peoples using television, film and video and tell their own stories. Our overall goal will be to better understand how visual images contribute to anthropology's project of fostering meaningful cross cultural understanding and communication.


Requirements: 2 take home essay exams, lectures and weekly attendance at screenings and screening reports. Anthro 104, 106 or some film studies background is helpful.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6
ART 230—PHOTOGRAPHY I

Instructor: TBA Cap: 14

Tu/Th 9:30AM – 12:15PM SAB Rm. 18

Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: none



ART 275—DIGITAL MEDIA: STILL IMAGE

Instructor: TBA Cap: 14

M/W 1:25 – 4:10PM SAB Rm. 16

This course explores the creative possibilities of digital image creation and manipulation.  Through demonstrations, creative technical assignments, students explore the digital workflow in independent projects involving sustained inquiry into self-selected theme.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: none


ART 330—PHOTOGRAPHY III

Instructor: Susan Jahoda Cap: 14

M/W 1:25 – 4:10PM SAB Rm. 240

This course focuses on employing and expanding upon previously learned technical and critical skills specific to students' individual interests, practices and ideas. Critiques, readings, lectures, labs.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: none


ART 345—DIGITAL MEDIA: PRINTMAKING

Instructor: Rosanne Retz Cap: 14

Tu/Th 9:30AM—12:15PM SAB Rm. 16

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: none
ART 374—INT. COMPUTER ANIMATION

Instructor: TBA Cap: 14

Tu/Th 4:00 – 5:55PM FAC Rm. 447

First half of a two-semester sequence. With studio. Principles and applications of computer animation using Crater and Alias Maya software in film, video, music, and technology. Introduction to 2D and 3D animation programs. Skills acquired in preparation for production in second semester. Emphasis on professionalism and quality. Prerequisites: ART 271, 297Q. Should be followed by 397, 3D Computer Animation.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8


ART 574—ANIMATION FUNDAMENTALS

Instructor: Patricia Galvis-Assmus Cap: 2

Tu/Th 9:30AM – 12:15PM FAC Rm. 447

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8
COMM 140—INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES Cap: 125

Instructor: Marty Norden

TBA

Lecture, lab (screening). This course offers an introduction to the study of film as a distinct medium. It introduces the ways in which film style, form, and genre contribute to the meaning and the experience of movies. Topics include film as industrial commodity, narrative and non-narrative form, aspects of style (e.g. composition, cinematography, editing, and sound), and the role of film as a cultural practice. Examples are drawn from new and classic films, from Hollywood and from around the world. This course is intended to serve as a basis for film studies courses you might take in the future. Course Eligibility*: Open to Juniors, Sophomores & Freshmen only. 75 seats are reserved for COMM Majors. Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: I, V



Five College Film Studies Major category: 1
Course Notes: This course was formerly numbered and titled COMM 240: Modes of Film Communication. If you have received credit for taking COMM 240, you will not receive credit for taking this course.
COMM 231—FILM & TELEVISION PRODUCTION CONCEPTS

Kevin Anderson Cap: 150

TBA

Lecture, discussion. This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and video production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting/pre-production, production and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting, lenses, types of film and videotape, crew organization and function, editing concepts, sound recording, etc. will be discussed, as well as creative functions such as dramatic and documentary structure, creating characters, acting for the screen, visualization and composition for the camera and more. Course Eligibility*: Open to COMM & Undeclared majors Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: I, V



Five College Film Studies Major category: 6
COMM 331-- PROGRAM PROCESS IN TELEVISION

David Maxcy

TBA Cap: 36

Lecture, studio. This course introduces concepts and techniques of television production through weekly lectures and lab meetings. During the first six weeks basic concepts and techniques are introduced in lecture. Students then break up into lab groups where, under the supervision of their lab instructor, they produce a short program which puts the concept of the week to work. During the rest of the course students work on two major projects: first, a short, narrative piece shot in single-camera, post-production style, and, second, a multiple camera piece shot live in the studio. Comm 331 is offered every fall and spring semester. (Course capacity is 36 Total/3 sections @ 12) Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8
COMM 340—HISTORY OF FILM I

Anne Ciecko Cap: 50

TBA


Lecture, lab (screening). A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950. In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television. Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors, other students by permission of instructor Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 2


COMM 397B—ST: INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO DIRECTING

David Macxy Cap: 10

TBA

Lecture, studio. Students will learn basic concepts and techniques of studio television production, with a focus on directing live programs in a full-scale studio facility on the UMASS campus. The course includes lecture presentations, production exercises, script-writing projects, and studio production projects. Each student will write, produce, and direct two live studio productions. Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior, Junior & Sophomore Communication majors only. Course Notes: If have taken COMM 433 you CANNOT take this course. Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V



Five College Film Studies Major category: 8
COMM 397CC—SEMINAR- INTRO TO VIDEO ART PRODUCTION

TBA Cap: 10

This course will introduce students to a wide range of narrative, experimental and documentary strategies. Students will gain experience in basic production techniques and will learn to think about and look. Course requirements include the completion of three video production assignments and one longer final project. The course will include workshops in lighting, final cut pro, and sound recording and mixing.

Course Eligibility*: Instructor Consent Required

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8



COMM 441—PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF FILM STYLE PRODUCTION

Instructor: Kevin Anderson Cap: 12

TBA

Lecture, studio. Hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using 16 mm film cameras and/or digital video camcorders (electronic field production) and non-linear (computer-based) editing. Students learn concepts of pre-production, shot composition, lighting, visual story telling, continuity editing, and production and post-production audio as they plan, shoot, and edit exercises and complete projects.



Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8


COMM 493E—SEMINAR-SCREENWRITING

Bruce Geisler Cap: 20

TBA

Lecture, discussion. An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films, and more. Written work includes three screenwriting projects. The focus is on writing for narrative films and, to a limited extent, TV programs.



Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors only.

Prerequisites: COMM film course

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 8


COMM 493F—SEMINAR-FILM DOCUMENTARY Cap: 20

Bruce Geisler

TBA

This course combines critical analysis with a hands-on introduction to producing a documentary. Students will view, analyze, and critique a range of documentary films, to further their understanding of the documentarian's craft and art. Students will also do pre-production (research and scripting) on their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, use of archival sources, etc.



Course Prerequisite: COMM 231 or COMM 240 or COMM 340 or COMM 342 or COMM 493E or consent of instructor.

Course Eligibility*: Open to Senior & Junior Communication majors

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 4


COMM 497AB—ST-HOLLYWOOD FILM, DIVERSITY AND ADAPTATION

Demetria Shabazz Cap: 25

TBA

Lecture, discussion. This course aims to inspire the development of a critical vocabulary for analysis of the formal conventions of film, especially as they bear on literary discourse. In addition, this course will focus on cinematic and literary works that articulate or express specific notions of American identity in terms of race, class, and gender. This class will look specifically at how the film industry negotiates specific literary narratives about identity within American society as a means of adapting the texts to the big screen.



Course Eligibility*: Senior and Junior Communication majors or by permission of instructor

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6,7
COMP-LIT 350—FRENCH FILM

Instructors: Catherine Portuges, Kathryn Lachman Cap: 120

The development of French film from the 1930s and its relations to French society. Analysis and reading of specific films, the ideology of different film practices, and relevant aspects of film theory, including questions of representations. Films by directors such as Vigo, Carné, Renoir, Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Truffaut, Ackerman, Kurys, Tavernier. Course taught in English (with screenings).

Course Eligibility*: All majors; no prerequisites

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 5


COMP-LIT 381—SELF-REFLECTIVE AVANT-GARDE FILM

Instructor: Don Levine Gen. Ed: AT

M 3:35 – 7:00 PM Cap: 96

Modern origins of experimentation in film and literature in avant-garde schools such as Expressionism and Surrealism, with contemporary results of this heritage. Whether film is the most modern of the media, the results of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike, and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic, and socially critical or anarchic.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIA, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6


COMP-LIT 391B—DYSTOPIAN FUTURES IN FILM AND FICTION

Instructor: Daphne Patai Cap:

Lecture: Tu 4:00 -7:00 PM

Discussion: Th 4:15-5:00 PM

Literature and film provide us with entertainment, pleasure, and stimulation. But dystopias -- in addition to working at that level -- express and address some of our most urgent fears and worries about our future. What does it mean to be human in an ever more technological society? How does society organize itself in a post-industrial age? What happens to individuals in a world whose culture is ever more homogeneous and driven by consumerism? What is the future of the human body? Are humans still linked to the natural world? What is the likely fate of our planet? What are the dangers of science and technology to a species whose emotions and wisdom may not keep up with its knowledge? What methods of social, economic, and political control will postmodern societies depend on? What space will exist for non-conformists? What is the role of religion in maintaining social order? These are only a few of the crucial issues to be explored in this course.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6 (component)
HEBREW 344 – HEBREW THROUGH THE MEDIA I

Instructor: Bolozky Cap: 16

TuTh 11:15AM-12:30PM

Instruction of Hebrew through the use of: clips from Israeli feature films

and from other video sources (TV programs, documentaries, etc.); radio

broadcasts, popular songs and other audio recordings; newspaper items; and

multimedia computer programs. Most materials will be web-based, some on

CD's/DVD's. When available, the resources used will include interactive

assignments. Prerequisite: HEBREW 120 or 126 A variety of proficiency levels will be

accommodated, but at least two semesters of Hebrew are required.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: none


ITALIAN 497AF/5697AF – THE “MAESTRI:” ANTONIONI AND FELLINI

Instructor: Malaguti Cap: 50

TuTh 2:30-3:45PM; Th 5:00-7:30PM

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V



JOURNAL 393F—JOURNALISTS IN THE MOVIES
Instructor: Katzenbach Cap: 25
Tu 4:00-7:00PM
They can be heroes; they can be villains. They can be ruthless; they can be sympathetic. They can be right; they can be wrong - and perhaps sometimes a bit of both. Since the first film director yelled "Action!" on a studio back lot, journalists of all sorts - local reporters, television news crews, even foreign correspondents - have been staples of the Hollywood milieu. The movies that have emerged have done much to define how people view journalists and continue to inform those opinions - both positive and negative - today. In an examination of selected films from the 1930s to current times, this class will explore perceptions of reporters, and reporters' choices through the prism of the big screen. Films to be seen will range from All The President's Men to The Year of Living Dangerously. Readings likely to include such works as Schanberg: The Death and Life of Dith Pran; Caputo: Means of Escape. Open to Journalism, Communicaiton & Film Studies majors.

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6 (component)
JUDAIC 344 - FILM AND SOCIETY IN ISRAEL

Instructor: Olga Gershenson Cap: 25

W 4:40-7:30PM

This course uses film to discuss Israeli society. Topics include:

foundation of Israel, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Holocaust survivors,

religion, gender, and interethnic relations. All film showings are with

English subtitles. No prerequisites. (Gen. Ed. 4 CR)

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6 (component)
SPANISH  397PP  ST-SPANISH CINEMA
Instructor: Jose Ornelas     Cap: 27

Th 4:00 - 6:30PM

Analysis of several films by some of the most important Spanish directors from the sixties to the early XXI Century, in the context of Spanish history, society, culture and politics. Special attention will be given to films by Buñuel, Saura and Almodóvar, the three most acclaimed Spanish film directors of the 20th Century. The following topics will be analyzed: representation of gender, history, national identity and the Spanish Civil War; filmic narrative; role of religion; sexual and sociopolitical repression; violence and transgression; (de)construction of myths, symbols and conventions associated with the church, bullfighting, machismo; and other topics. All films will be streamed. Requirements: Mid-term, Final, 3 short essays and several readings.

Course Eligibility*:  All majors; no prerequisites


Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category:  IIB, V
Five College Film Studies Major category:  5

SPANISH  497FB  ST-FROM BOOK TO SCREEN  

Barbara Zecchi   Cap:

Tu 4:00 - 6:30PM

This course looks at film adaptation in Spain. Taught in Spanish

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6,7


Fall 2013 UMASS GRADUATE FILM COURSES
COMM 593B—FASHION, MEDIA, CULTURE, STYLE

Anne Ciecko Cap:

TBA

Open to Undergraduates?



(if so, Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IV, V)

Five College Film Studies Major category: 6,7


COMM 593D—ADVANCED SCREENWRITING

Bruce Geisler Cap:

TBA

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies certificated category: IV, V



Five College Film Studies Major category: 8,7
COMP-LIT 695A—INTERNATIONAL FILM NOIR

Instructor: Don Levine Cap: 15

W 3:35-7:30PM

Often referred to as the only indigenous American film style, "film noir" in its very appellation reveals that its major effects (for certain modern conceptions of cinema) lay elsewhere. We will examine film noir in its American heyday (1945-1957) and how it came to be a major propelling force in the new European cinema of the 1960's (Godard, and the Cahiers du cinema).

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V

Five College Film Studies Major category: 4,7


ITALIAN 497AF/5697AF – THE “MAESTRI:” ANTONIONI AND FELLINI

Instructor: Malaguti Cap: 50



TuTh 2:30-3:45PM; Th 5:00-7:30PM

Undergraduate UMass Film Studies Certificate category: IIB, IV, V

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