Traditional eastern medicine and modern health



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University of Southern California

1HP450



Course Syllabus Fall 2014, Version 8/23/14; similar to 8/17/14

TRADITIONAL EASTERN MEDICINE AND MODERN HEALTH



Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Studies

Monday/Wednesday 10:00-11:50am

VKC 256
Faculty:

Julia Borovay, Dr.P.H.

Office hours: by appointment Mon/Wed after class

Alternative meeting times available by phone or online

borovay@usc.edu
The Chinese physician looks at a patient the way a painter looks at a landscape—as a particular arrangement of being, behavior, interaction, and life signs in which the essence of the whole can be seen.”(Kaptchuk, 2000, p.18)
Welcome and Introduction to HP 450: Welcome to HP450, Eastern (and Alternative) Medicine and Modern Health. I am your lecturer, Dr. Julia Borovay. My background is in medical anthropology and public health. In this course, we will be drawing on concepts of culture and communication to learn how most effectively to work with patients with medical beliefs and practices that may be very different from your own. I have designed HP450, as part of the HP Department, to provide strategies to further enhance and broaden your knowledge and skills for working in clinical settings with patients from differing cultural backgrounds in your future professional lives.
Course Description: This course introduces traditional Eastern and alternative medical views of health and illness and their relationship to Western biomedical practices. Topics we will cover include the concepts of balance between the human body and the natural environment, causes and diagnoses of disease, Qi, and specific Eastern and alternative medical therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, herbal medicine, and movement practices such as yoga and Qi Dong. We will examine differences between Eastern and Western health belief systems and practices, including issues related to culturally effective medical approaches, communication, and patient satisfaction and adherence to medical treatment plans.
Course Objectives: Upon course completion, you will be prepared to approach professional interactions with patients who incorporate traditional Eastern and alternative medical values into their personal health care with a strong foundation in the theories and practices upon which Eastern and alternative medicine is based. You will have an understanding of Eastern and alternative perspectives about the causes and symptoms of diseases and their diagnosis and treatment. You will be able to approach patient-practitioner interactions with culturally-based knowledge about the ways in which patients with Eastern and alternative medical beliefs maintain health, interpret disease episodes, seek health care, and integrate traditional Eastern and alternative medical practices with Western biomedicine.
Before We Get Started: HP450 is a 400-level course that involves academic library-based research, advanced writing skills or documented steps taken to improve your current writing, the development and enhancement of your public speaking skills, and a large number of collaborative group discussions and activities. Before deciding to take this class, assess the amount of time, effort, and energy that you will be required to invest in the course in light of your competing academic and personal demands, and determine if this class is the best choice for you this semester.
What This Class is Not:

  • This is not a lecture class. You will be expected to participate daily in group discussions, role plays, presentations, and activities.

  • This is not a class about particular formulae of Eastern and alternative herbal products and remedies. We will focus on the human, cultural aspects of the use of Eastern and alternative therapies and what that means for you as a future professional in a biomedical field.


What I Expect From You: I expect you to attend class consistently and on time, and to come to class each day filled with enthusiasm and prepared to participate fully in discussions and activities.
Methods of Instruction: My teaching strategy focuses on active learning, in which I alternate the “talking head” form of traditional lecture with activities and discussions in which I expect you to enthusiastically participate. I typically break the class time into approximately fifteen to twenty minute segments, generally (but not always) along the following lines:

  • Greeting, news, and opening discussion topic

  • Lecture

  • Five minute class break

  • Class activities

  • Follow-up discussion

  • Sum up

We will also have one very enchanting class field trip in which I hope everyone will be able to participate.


Required Course Text:

  • Kaptchuk TJ. The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine. 2000. New York: McGraw-Hill.

  • Supplemental readings and research articles as assigned. Research journal articles are available to you for free as a registered USC student electronically through the extensive USC library system. I do not post supplemental readings on Blackboard.


Grading Criteria: I evaluate your learning accomplishments in HP 450 based primarily on a point system of approximately 400 points, depending on how much material we cover, for 8 point-valued tasks in the class. However, I practice the art as well as the science of evaluation in teaching, so points alone will not necessarily determine your final course grade. I tend to assign grades more generously for students who do the following:

  • demonstrate engagement in class activities, discussions, and assignments

  • get documented assistance if I recommend it with the improvement of their writing skills

  • make an appointment to meet with me during my after-class office hours

  • attend class consistently and on time


NOTE: I may modify the following grade components and rubrics as needed during the course of the semester. If I do, I will notify you in writing of any modifications.
The following are the 8 point-valued course assignments:
1. Class Group Activities [approximately 80 points]: There will be an assortment of group activities scheduled for almost every class during the semester. Each class activity is worth between 2 and 6 points. Hone your drama skills and tap into your imagination, innate extroversion, social skills, and creativity for impromptu or rehearsed role plays, small group readings activities, interactive games, case studies discussions, and other active learning strategies.
*There can be no make-ups of the class group activities, because they must be conducted within your group during class time. There are no exceptions to this policy, regardless of the reason for an absence.
Grade Rubric for Class Group Activities:

Component Points



You participate fully and actively in each class’s group activities, discussions, and ole plays. You turn in your activity sheet for each activity, signed clearly with your printed full name and the date.

Good work: 2 to 6 pts, depending on the activity
Less active participation; you didn’t turn in your activity form; absent for any reason: 0 points

………………..

2. Midterm Exam [50 points]. There will be one midterm exam, with a multiple choice format. Scheduled tentatively at this point for 10/15/14.

……………….



3. Field Trip: [50 points] You will have the enchanting opportunity to visit the meditation grounds of the Self-Realization Center at the Lake Shrine in Pacific Palisades. We will schedule this field trip on a day and time so that as many students as possible will be able to attend. There will be a class activity at the Lake Shrine, and participation is worth 50 points. We will use class time to arrange car pooling among members of the class, with those of you fortunate enough to possess cars assisting those of you without access to transportation. (Those of you accepting a ride should chip in a few dollars for gas money in appreciation of the volunteer driver). If you cannot attend the field trip on the scheduled group date, I encourage you to visit the Self-Realization Center by yourself at a different time and to submit a time-identified, non-Photo-shopped photograph of yourself in a recognizable section of the Center for full make-up participation points.
Grade Rubric for the Class Field Trip:

Component Points



You arrive at the Lake Shrine at the time and on the day we select in class for maximum participation. You quietly engage with one or two other students in a small group as you explore the mediation grounds and participate in a class activity as you do so. As you leave the grounds, you turn in the activity form to me.
If you visit the Lake Shrine at a different time, you inform me in advance and arrange to bring a copy of the activity form with you. You quietly explore the meditative grounds. You have someone take an authentic, non-Photo-shopped photograph of you at a recognizable part of the Lake Shrine. You submit the photo and your activity sheet to me.

Full participation at the Lake Shrine: 50 pts
If you are not able to visit the Self-Realization Center, either with our group or on your own: 0 points. See me.


4. Lake Shrine Reflective Essay: [25 possible points] A thoughtful, well-written, grammatically flawless one-to-two page Reflective Essay describing your Lake Shrine experience is due a week after our field trip.
Grade Rubric for the Lake Shrine Reflective Essay:

Component Points



You compose and turn in a thoughtful, grammatically flawless, well-structured, college-level, one-to-two page, double-spaced, typed reflective essay of three-to-five paragraphs describing your experience at the Lake Shrine. What did you do? What did you observe? What feelings did you have during the experience? What did you bring away from the experience at the Lake Shrine? Did you learn something new, or relearn something you hadn’t thought about for a while? How might you apply your experience to future endeavors or goals?

Well-written, informative and thoughtful: 21 to 25 pts
Could be a more thoughtfully written essay: 15 to 20 pts
Writing is less than college level: 0 to 14 pts

………………..


5. Eastern and Alternative Medicine in the News [20 points]. You are expected to share with the class an item of interest in the news and popular media related to the topic of Eastern and alternative medicine. The article must relate to the human, cultural aspect of the non-biomedical practice, remedy, or belief. Clip or print out the item and bring it to class to share with the rest of us. A sign-up list will be made available early in the semester, with spaces for two or three people to sign up for each of the dates listed. You will be expected to stand and address the class, and to orally summarize the article—don’t just read it aloud. If you happen to bring the same item as does another person [on the same day or on another day], the second speaker to summarize the same media item will be expected to address a slightly different angle of the same article. You will both receive the points.
Grade Rubric for the Eastern and Alternative Medicine in the News:

Component Points



You come prepared on the day your relevant popular news article is scheduled to be shared with the class. You stand up, face the audience, maintain eye contact, and present the main points of your news item. You do not simply read the item to the other students. You make sure the item relates to the human, cultural aspect of Eastern or alternative medicine—it is not simply a biomedical article describing a biophysiological or pharmaceutical discovery or a simple description of an Eastern or alternative practice. You take the time to read the article in advance and to highlight the main points. You turn it in to me when you are done.

Relevant article; summarized with good speaking skills; turned in copy of article; 20 pts
You forgot your date or the article; poor speaking skills; article not relevant to our class: 0 pts

………………..



6. Five-Step Research Poster Presentation: Three Perspectives on Eastern and Alternative Medicine [100 points]: This is the biggest and most important semester-long assignment you will have in HP450. You are expected to research, prepare, and share with the class information you have gathered on an Eastern or alternative medical remedy or practice that is of interest to you. It involves five consecutive steps, each building on the step preceding it, culminating in a seven-page written narrative, the creative design of a professional conference-style research poster, and the presentation of your research to the class.
*IMPORTANT: We are not trying to decide whether a particular Eastern or alternative remedy or practice “works”. We are looking at the reasons why people use that remedy or practice, and applying that knowledge to the enhancement of patient-practitioner interactions in a biomedical setting.
*Also Important: Please DO NOT ingest any unfamiliar herbal products or participate in uncomfortable Eastern or alternative medical therapies as part of your research for this class project.
The Research Poster Presentation process is divided up into five separately graded steps, each building on the step that preceded it, due at progressive intervals during the semester:

The Five Steps for Choosing, Researching, Designing, and Presenting Your Research Poster:
Step 1: Brainstorm: you participate during class in brainstorming possible topics [not a

graded activity (tentatively scheduled for 9/10/14)]


Step 2: Identify Your Research Topic: You identify your selected research topic on a

sign-up list [5 points (due 9/17/14)]


Step 3: Topic Description (with References Cited): You turn in a single page,

typed and double–spaced, brief but coherent, grammatically flawless, college-level description of your selected Eastern or alternative remedy or practice. You explain WHY you chose the topic. You list the accurately formatted reference citations and attach photocopies or print-outs of the first two pages of each of FOUR reference resources about your selected topic. (Note: you do not summarize the four articles at this point) [20 points (due 10/01/14)]:


a. Two articles representing the popular media perspective about your topic. The articles may be published either online, in a newspaper or magazine, or from another similar popular source. These popular media articles are expected to address the human, cultural aspect of an Eastern and alternative medical remedy or practice and why people make use of it—they cannot be simply descriptions of a particular practice or substance. Photocopy or print out and attach the first two pages of each article.
b. Two academic reference articles representing the biomedical perspective about your topic. Each of the two articles must have been published in a professional academic medical, nursing, anthropological, or public health journal within the last 10 years (between 2004 and 2014). Websites and magazine articles may NOT substitute for these academic journal articles. The two academic journal articles are expected to address the same remedy or practice that is presented in your two popular media articles, and to provide a second perspective on why people make use of it; they cannot present a purely bio-physiological study of a particular biochemical substance. *Citations MUST be in AMA (American Medical Association) format. Photocopy or print out and attach the first two pages of each article.
Tip: To be sure that an article is a published academic article, check that it is abstracted online on PubMed (pubmed.gov).
*Note: It will be challenging to find these academic articles; please plan on devoting an appropriate amount of your time early in the semester to this aspect of the assignment. You will access the full-text articles through the USC library system, available to you for free as USC student. Depending on the topic you choose, these articles may not always be easy to find. If you realize that you cannot find enough appropriate articles on your topic, it’s time to choose a different topic. See me.
Step 4: Narrative Text (with Reference Summaries): You compose a well-written,

grammatically flawless, 7 page, double-spaced, college-level narrative text for your Research Poster, based on and enhancing the text you turned in for the previous Step 2: Topic Description. [25 points (due 10/29/14)]


Include the following sections:



1. Introduction (2 ½ pages)

  • The Remedy or Practice: Eloquently, objectively, and accurately describe the remedy or practice you researched (1 page)

  • Reasons Why the Remedy or Practice is Used: Eloquently, objectively, and accurately explain the reasons why people make use of this remedy or practice (1 page)

  • Why I Chose to Research This Topic: Eloquently, objectively, and accurately explain your personal interest and motivation for choosing to research this remedy or practice (½ page)

2. Perspectives (4 pages)

  • Perspective #1: The Popular Media. Eloquently, objectively, and accurately summarize in your own words the main points of your two popular media references. Summarize the two articles separately. Focus on what the articles say about WHY people make use of the remedy or practice. Include the accurate citations for the two articles. (1 page)

  • Perspective #2. The Academic Literature. Eloquently, objectively, and accurately summarize in your own words the main points of your two academic journal articles. Summarize the two articles separately. *Do not use the articles’ abstracts for this section: you must use your own words. Focus on what the articles say about WHY people make use of the remedy or practice. Include the accurate citations for the two articles. (2 pages)

  • Perspective #3. Your Informed Perspective. Eloquently, objectively, and accurately summarize your own perspective about why people make use of the remedy or practice, now that you have spent the semester researching the topic. Describe how knowledge about the remedy or practice and the reasons why people make use of it can be applied to working with patients in a biomedical setting. Avoid trying to determine whether or not the remedy or practice “works”. (1 page)

3. Future Directions (½ page): Eloquently, objectively, and accurately compose

a description of three separate suggestions for future research about your topic. (½ page)


Step 5: The Research Poster Presentation. You design a creative, visually informative,

professional-level research poster that uses the narrative text to present the three perspectives on your selected Eastern or alternative remedy or practice, why people make use of it, and how knowing about it can be applied to working with patients in a biomedical setting. You present your data on the date scheduled to multiple small groups of fellow-classmates and to me, who will evaluate your presentation and poster design, in a simulated professional conference poster session.[50 pts (due in November according to the sign-up schedule)]



Grade Rubric for the Five-Step Research Poster Presentation:
Component Points

Step 1. Brainstorm topic ideas

…………………………………………………………………………………….

Step 2. Identify Your Research Topic

……………………………………………………………………………………..

Step 3. Topic Description

………………………………………………………………………………………

Step 4. Narrative Text
……………………………………………………………………………………..

Step 5. Research Poster Presentation




0 pts [not graded](9/10/14)

……………………….

5 pts (9/17/14)

…………………………

Instructions are followed; it is a well-written description of the topic and your reasons for choosing it; correct citations of all four articles are included; photocopies as instructed are included: 20 pts (due10/01/14)
*Anything less than excellent: points deducted

…………………………

Instructions are followed; it is a well-written narrative; correct reference citations; contains the required four (a-d) components: 25 pts (due 10/29/14)
*Anything less than excellent: points deducted
…………………………..

Excellent, creative, informative poster design; instructions were followed; original and imaginative; appropriate visual elements relate to the topic; demonstration of good public speaking skills within the scheduled poster session time frames: 50 pts (due in November according to the sign-up schedule)


*Anything less than excellent: points deducted



*What Not To Do for the Research Poster Project: Here is what I, as your professor, especially do not want to see in this assignment, and for which I will deduct varying numbers of points:
1) Biomedical criticism or dismissal of the Eastern or alternative practice—because most biomedical articles are critical or dismissive of Eastern and alternative medical practices. This is not what we are looking for. We are looking for the human, cultural perspective of why people use Eastern or alternative therapies. Both the popular and the biomedical articles you use must address reasons WHY people use these therapies and what that means for biomedical practice. I will deduct points for any articles turned in for this component of the project that do not address reasons why people use the remedy or practice you are researching.
2) A description of your own opinion about whether or not the remedy or practice “works”. This is not what we are looking for. The focus is on why people use that remedy or practice and how knowledge about those reasons can enhance biomedical practice. I will deduct points for narrative components that simply try to assess whether or not a particular remedy or practice “works”.
3) A messy, poorly designed, unimaginative research poster without effective visual embellishments that illustrate the topic; a poster that has the appearance of being thrown together at the last minute; substandard public speaking skills; poor time management in your research poster presentation; writing levels that are less than 400-level college work.

…………………………



7. Final Exam [50 points]: The University requires that all instructors adhere to the final examination schedule. The final exam is mandatory for all students. The final exam focuses on the second half of the semester, but may contain some questions referring to the subject of Eastern and alternative medicine on a more semester-wide level. Most of the final exam will be in multiple-choice format. The final exam is scheduled for Monday, December 15th, 8:00-10:00am in this classroom.

………………………..



8. Final Reflective Essay [25 points]: You will compose and turn in on the day of the final exam a thoughtful, well-written, grammatically flawless, typed, one-to-two page Final Reflective Essay describing what you have taken away from your experience in HP450. I am most interested in knowing how you might plan to apply your learning experience in HP450 to your future career and professional goals. NOTE: I am NOT looking for praise for the class or for myself, but for a thoughtful assessment of what you feel you have learned about Eastern and Alternative Medicine and how you might be able to apply it to your own future plans.
Grade Rubric for the Final Reflective Essay:
Component Points

You compose and turn in a thoughtful, grammatically flawless, well-structured, college-level, one-to-two page, double-spaced, typed reflective essay describing what you have learned about Eastern and Alternative Medicine this semester and how you envision applying what you’ve learned to your future academic and career plans.


Well-written, thoughtful, & informative: 21 to 25 pts
Could be a more thoughtfully written essay: 15 to 20 pts
Writing is less than college level: 0 to 14 pts

…………………….

Grades: Letter grades are assigned according to the following USC standard formula:

93-100% = A 90-92% = A- 87-89% = B+

83-86% = B 80-82% = B- 77-79% = C+

73-76% = C 70-72% = C- 67-69% = D+

63-66% = D 60-62% = D- <60% = F
Summary of Grade Points for the Eight Course Tasks for HP450:


Task

Points Possible/%

Due Dates

1. Class group activities

Est. 80 pts [approx. 20%]

ongoing

2. Midterm Exam

50 pts [12.5%]

10/15/14 [tentative date]

3. Field Trip

50 pts [12.5%]

Around 10/20/14. Schedule to be arranged in class

4. Reflective Essay on Lake Shrine experience

25 pts [6%]

Due one week after the field trip

5. Eastern & Alternative Medicine in the News

20 pts [5%]

Due on the date you select in the sign-up schedule

6. Five-Step Research Poster Presentation:

1. Brainstorm

2. Identify Your Research Topic

3. Topic Description

4. Narrative Text

5. Research Poster Presentation



100 pts total [25%]

1. not graded

2. 5 pts

3. 20 pts

4. 25 pts

5. 50 pts


1. 9/10/14

2. 9/17/14

3. 10/01/14

4. 10/29/14

5. As scheduled on one of 3 days:

11/12/14; 11/17/14; or 11/19/14.


7. Final exam

50 pts [12.5%]

12/15/14 8:00-10:00am in this room

[written in stone]



8. Written Reflection on Eastern and Alternative Medicine and your own future professional plans

25 pts [6%]

12/15/14

Total

Est. 400 points





Course Policies
Participation: You are expected to arrive on time, remain for the entire class period, and to engage in active, thoughtful, respectful class participation. Everyone is expected to contribute to class discussions.
Reading: You are expected to access a copy of the textbook, which we will be using for point-valued class activities. You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assigned reading for that day, both of the textbook and of the academic reference articles listed in the Syllabus. You can access these assigned articles via the University’s library resources; I will NOT post the articles on Blackboard. During class, you are expected to be prepared to discuss important points from the readings. It is your choice how much to contribute to active participation in discussions, but I have found that students who excel in my class take the time to critically read in advance the assigned reading material. I will take your level of preparation and participation in discussions of the readings into consideration when assigning final grades for the class.
Controversy and Respect: This course covers a wide range of cultural issues, some of which may be controversial. You are expected to be courteous and respectful to fellow students, professors, and guest speakers. If you anticipate ethical or religious objections to any of the material covered in this course, please speak with me within the first two weeks of the semester.
Distractions: Please do not use your class time to read the student newspaper, check Facebook, or do homework from other classes. Yes, unbelievably, this has really happened. I reluctantly subtract class points for students who choose to utilize our class time for purposes other than our class. I deduct 3 points the first time I observe a student engrossed in work other than that of HP450 during class time, and I deduct 5 points for each subsequent time that I see the same student choosing to utilize our class time unwisely. This will be uncomfortable for both of us, so please do everything possible to avoid this situation.
Important Guidelines for Electronic Devices (Laptop Computers, iPads, and iPhones, etc.): In previous classes, some students have chosen to make inappropriate use of their electronic equipment. They are a distraction to me, to guest speakers, and to other students in the class. Because of this unfortunate trend, NO electronic equipment may be used during HP450 class time. Most course lecture materials will be available on Blackboard, reducing the need for you to take copious notes on an electronic device. Cell phones/laptops/iPads/other electronic devices must be turned off and put away in your backpack or bag and under your desk during class time. Please see me if you wish to discuss this issue. Again, I deduct class points for students who choose to use utilize our class time for purposes other than HP450. I deduct 3 points the first time I observe a student using an electronic device during class time, and I deduct 5 points for each subsequent time I observe the same student choosing to utilize our class time unwisely. Again, this will be uncomfortable for both of us, so please do everything possible to avoid this situation.
Sleeping in Class: I am aware that you have a demanding school schedule and that you might not be getting an adequate amount of sleep at night. It can be very easy to quietly fall asleep in class. However, for the purposes of HP450, I expect your active participation in the lectures, activities, and discussions. It is distracting both to me and to nearby students when a member of the class has apparent difficulty staying awake during class. Attempts to disguise one’s slumber under a lowered hat brim or behind a strategically placed backpack are rarely successful. If you feel that the challenge of remaining alert during the class lectures, discussions, and activities is overwhelming, please feel free to stand or move around the classroom, or, if necessary, step out of class until you feel prepared to continue. I may not deduct points if I observe you sleeping in class, but I will certainly attract your attention to wake you up. This will be uncomfortable for both of us, so please do everything possible to avoid this situation.
Food in Class: You may consume beverages in class. Small snacks such as fruit, crackers, or energy bars are acceptable as long as the unwrapping or peeling process isn’t overly long, noisy, odiferous/smelly, or otherwise disruptive to nearby class members. Do not bring salads or sandwiches to consume in class, as it is a distraction to others. Always clear all traces of your snack to appropriate trash and recycling receptacles before or immediately after you leave the classroom.

Policy on late work and absences: Punctual, consistent attendance is required for this class. In real life, illnesses and emergencies happen, and the occasional absence or tardiness may be unavoidable. You are an adult and there is no need to explain to me the circumstances that lead to your occasional absence from class. However, please be aware that group activities take place in nearly every class, and these cannot be made up, no matter how dire or extenuating the circumstances---precisely because they are group activities. There are approximately 100 class points invested in these group activities, so missing one or two should not jeopardize your final grade for the course. Absences or tardiness that result in the loss of points for three or more group activities, however, can start to accumulate and may ultimately impact your course grade. It is your responsibility to minimize your absences and tardy arrivals.


Make-Up Exams: Make-up of the midterm or final exams will only be offered prior to the regularly scheduled exam, except in the case of documented personal/family emergencies. In these exceptional cases, appropriate documentation, such as a note from a doctor or counselor, is required for a student to make-up a missed exam. All other work must be turned in on time, so please plan accordingly.



Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is expected of every student in all academic work. You are held to the University’s Code of Academic Integrity. All USC students are responsible for reading and following the Student Conduct Code, which can be found at http://www.usc.edu/dept/publications/SCAMPUS/governance. The USC student code prohibits plagiarism. Students who violate University standards for academic integrity are subject to disciplinary sanctions.


Statement for Students with Disabilities: Any student requesting academic accommodations based on a disability is required to register with Disability Services and Programs (DSP) each semester. A letter of verification for approved accommodations should be obtained from DSP and given to me early in the semester, preferably within the first two weeks. DSP is located in STU 301 and is open 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The phone number for DSP is (214) 740-0776.



Communication Policy: I encourage you to talk to me if you would like to discuss your progress in class, or if you feel you are having issues or difficulties and need assistance. I will be happy to assist you with study tips and guidance on how to improve your performance to earn the grade you desire. You are responsible for keeping all your work until final grades have been assigned. In case of a discrepancy between my calculations and your own, you will want to have them to document your earned points. I take great time and effort to assign grades in a fair, impartial manner. If you wish to discuss your grades with me, I encourage you to schedule a meeting to do so. If I made an error in calculating your score, I will correct it immediately.
*NOTE: If you wish to offer an extenuating circumstance as a reason for less-than-ideal results on an exam, paper, or presentation, I will offer sympathy and, if requested, a referral to student academic or support services. However, I will not change a grade because of these circumstances.


Another Tip: If you are facing challenges in any of your classes, including mine, speak to me or to your other professors in person as early in the semester as possible. You have an excellent resource on campus for assistance and advocacy if you are experiencing challenges in balancing your academic, personal, work, and family situations:


  • Office of Student Affairs, Student Union Building Rm. 201. PH (213) 740-2421

Meeting with me: To facilitate student-professor communication, I encourage you to sign up for a 10-minute meeting with me as a way of letting me know about yourself, your interests, and your future professional plans. A sign-up list will be available for appointments for up to three students per day, scheduled for up to the first 30 minutes after class. As a part-time lecturer, I do not have an office on campus. For these 10-minute meetings, I will be available to meet immediately after class (between approximately 11:45 and 12:45) on most Monday’s or Wednesday’s, either in an empty adjacent classroom or outside in the courtyard. I am on campus only for this class and not at any other times. If you cannot meet with me during the available time slots, we can set up a telephone or online meeting at a time of mutual convenience.




COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS



You are expected to complete all readings in advance and be prepared to discuss them on the day for which they are assigned.
NOTE: The following schedule may be modified by me during the course of the semester in response to student interests and needs. I will notify you in writing of any specific modifications in the course outline.
Textbook: Kaptchuk TJ. The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine. 2000. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Supplementary readings as assigned. You are responsible for accessing these readings, available to you as a USC student free through the university library system.
…………………….

8/25/14/Class 1: First Day of Class. Introductions to each other and to the course. Preliminary syllabus review. All About You. Your expectations. No readings assigned for today.
8/27/14/Class 2: Overview of Eastern and Western health practices and beliefs. No readings assigned for today.
Labor Day Holiday [9/01/14]
9/03/14/Class 3: Your health values and beliefs. Cultural perceptions of health and illness. Getting to know the syllabus and textbook. No readings assigned for today.
9/08/14/Class 4: Concepts and current practices of alternative medicine. The concept of empathy. Text Reading Assignment: Introduction pp. xxiii-xxvi *“Open-book” Syllabus Quiz: bring hard copies of the Syllabus and the “Writing and Research Skills for an “A” in HP450” handout. Both are posted on Blackboard.
Selected Reference Article:

Astin JA, Marie A, Pelletier KR, et al. A review of the incorporation of complementary and alternative medicine by mainstream physicians. Arch Intern Med. 1998:158 (21): 2303-2310.



9/10/14/Class 5: More about Eastern and alternative medicine. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 1: Medicine East and West. Pp.1-7; Chinese Painters and Chinese Physicians. Pp. 17-19. *Brainstorm ideas for Research Poster Presentation topics.
9/15/14/Class 6: More about Eastern and alternative medicine. History of Western biomedicine.
Selected Reference Articles:

Gaster B, Unterborn JN, Scott RB, Schneewiss R. What should students learn about complementary and alternative medicine? Acad Med. 2007;82(10):934-8.


Park CM. Diversity, the individual, and proof of efficacy: complementary and alternative medicine in medical education. Am J Public Health 2002; 92(10):1568-72.
9/17/14/Class 7: More about Eastern and Alternative Medicine. *Identify your proposed Research Poster Presentation topic on a sign-up list (5 pts)
Selected Reference Articles:

Baum M. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and cancer: the ugly face of alternative medicine. Int J Surg. 2009


Sampson W. The need for educational reform in teaching about alternative therapies. Acad Med. 2001;76(3):248-50
9/22/14/Class 8: Traditional Eastern medicine’s approach to pain and depression.
Selected Reference Article:

Kleinman A. Culture and depression. New England Journal of Medicine. 2004;351(10):951-952.


9/24/14/Class 9: Concepts of Eastern medicine. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 1: Medicine East and West. It May be Beautiful, But Does it Work? Pp.20-26.


9/29/14/Class 10: Overview of major spiritual belief systems and alternative practices.
Selected Reference Articles:

Farr FA, Roach CJ, Gorawara-Bhat R, et al. When patients choose faith over medicine: physician perspectives on religiously-related conflict in the medical encounter. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165:88-91.


Foster E. the spiritual encounter within a complementary therapy treatment. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2006;12(2):163-9.
Post SG, Puchalski CM, Larson DB. Physicians and patient spirituality: professional boundaries, competency, and ethics. Ann Intern Med. 2000; 142:578-583.
10/01/14/Class 11: Alternative medicine practices and ethnicity. *Turn in your one-page Topic Description (20 pts)
Selected Reference Articles:

Chao MT, Wade C, Kronenberg F, et al. Women’s reasons for complementary and alternative medicine use: racial/ethnic differences. J Altern Complement Med. 2006; 12(8):719-20.


Graham RE, Ahn AC, Davis RB, et al. Use of complementary and alternative medical therapies among racial and ethnic minority adults: results from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. J Natl Med Assoc. 2005; 97(4): 535-45.
Mehta DH, Phillips RS, Davis RB, McCarthy EP. Use of complementary and alternative therapies by Asian Americans: results from the National Health Interview survey. J Gen Intern Med. 2007;22(6):762-7.
Trangmar P, Diaz VA. Investigating complementary and alternative medicine use in a Spanish-speaking Hispanic community in South Carolina. Ann Fam Med. 2008 Jan-Feb; 6 Suppl 1:S12-5
10/06/14/Class 12: Communicating with patients about alternative medicine.
Selected Reference Articles:

Waitzkin, H. Doctor-patient communication. Clinical implications of social scientific research. JAMA 1984; 252(17):2441-2446.

Suchman AL, Markasis K, Beckman HB, Frankel R. A model of empathetic communication in the medical interview. JAMA 1997;277(8):678-682.
10/08/14/Class 13: Communicating with patients about alternative medicine, con’t.
Selected Reference Article:

Chao MT, Wade C, Kronenberg F. Disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine to conventional medical providers: variation by race/ethnicity and type of CAM. J Natl Med Assoc. 2008 Nov; 100(11):1441-9.


10/13/14/Class 14: More on communication about alternative medicine. Review for Midterm Exam.
Selected Reference Articles:

Kennedy J, Wang CC, Wu CH. Patient disclosure about herb and supplement use among adults in the U.S. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008 Dec; 5(4):451-6.


Mehta DH, Gardiner PM, Phillips RS, McCarthy EP. Herbal and dietary supplement disclosure to health care providers by individuals with chronic conditions. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Dec; 14(10):1263-9.
10/15/14/Class 15: Midterm Exam covers material in Classes 8/25/14-10/13/14.
10/20/14/Class 16: Field trip [tentatively scheduled]
10/22/14/Class 17: Theories of balance: Yin and Yang. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 1: Medicine East and West. Yin and Yang. Pp.7-15; Chapter 3: The Organs of the Body. The Yang Organs: Stomach, Gall Bladder, Bladder, Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Triple Burner. Pp.93-98; The Yin Organs: Spleen, Liver, Kidneys, Heart, Pericardium, Lungs. Pp.75-93.
10/27/14/Class 18: Qi. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 2 pp. 41-52.
10/29/14/Class 19: Blood and Essence. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 2 pp. 52-57. *Turn in your seven-page Narrative Text (25 points)
11/03/14/Class 20: Spirit and Fluids. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 2 pp. 58-67.

11/05/14/Class 21: The Meridians. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 4 pp. 105-111.
11/10/14/Class 22: Causes of Disease: The Six Pernicious Influences. Text Reading

Assignment: Chapter 5 pp.143-157. The Seven Emotions and Way of Life. Text

Reading Assignment: Chapter 5 pp. 157-166.
11/12/14/Class 23: Research Poster Presentations Day #1.
11/17/14/Class 24: Research Poster Presentations Day #2
11/19/14/Class 25: Research Poster Presentations Day #3.
11/24/14/Class 26: Alternative Medicine in Popular Culture: “Contagion”, with activity

Thanksgiving Holiday [11/26/14-11/28/14]
12/01/14/Class 27: The Four Examinations: Signs and Symptoms. Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 6. pp.171-210.
12/03/14/Class 28: LAST DAY OF CLASS. Conclude The Four Examinations. Eastern Medicine as an Art; Text Reading Assignment: Chapter 9 pp. 283-291. Conclusion of HP 450 and review for final exam.
………………………………..

Our final exam is scheduled for Monday, December 15th, 8:00-10:00am in this classroom.

……………………………..



Patients need treatment. Practitioners need strategies…I have adopted the perspective that healing must embody an art with a compelling and even poetic message.” (Kaptchuk, 2000, p.xxvi)





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