Tom Peters’ Re-Imagine excellence!



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Gamification “Gamification presents the best tools humanity has ever had to create and sustain engagement in people.” Source: Gabe Zichermann & Joselin Linder, Gamification: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition

  • “Gamification”: LEARNING/
  • MASTERY
  • Is the Drug
  • It Ain’t About the Ws and Ls!
  • “Fun from games arises out of mastery. It arises out of comprehension. It is the
  • act of solving puzzles that makes games fun. In other words, with games, learning
  • is the drug.” —Raph Koster, A Theory of Fun For Game Designers
  • “Gamification”

For the Win: How Game Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Business —Kevin Werbach & Dan Hunter The Gamification Revolution: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition —Gabe Zichermann & Joselin Linder Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World —Jane McGonigal

Feedback Friends Fun Source: The Gamification Revolution: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition —Gabe Zichermann & Joselin Linder

Work.com/Salesforce.com: “… suite of mobile apps that enabled people inside the organization to provide instant feedback to their co-workers for a job well done” “Facebook-style newsfeed,” “badges, leaderboards, point systems” “turned the review process into something people actually want to do” Source: The Gamification Revolution: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition —Gabe Zichermann & Joselin Linder

“Idea Street”/UK Department of Work and Pensions (28% UK budget): “staff provide innovative ideas and vote for the best ones” “first nine months: $16 million in savings” “meaning was within the game itself, not the external reward” Source: The Gamification Revolution: How Leaders Leverage Game Mechanics to Crush the Competition —Gabe Zichermann & Joselin Linder

  • MMORPG/Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game
  • Source: Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make
  • Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  • “Why exactly are we competing with each other to do the dirty work? We’re playing a free online game called Chore Wars —and it just so happens that ridding our real-world kingdom of toilet stains is worth more experience points, or XP, than any other chore in our apartment. … A mom in Texas describes a typical Chore Wars experience: ‘We have three kids, ages 9, 8, and 7. I sat down with the kids, showed them their characters and the adventures, and they literally jumped up and ran off to complete their chosen task. I’ve never seen my 8-year-old son make
  • his bed. I nearly fainted when my husband cleaned
  • out the toaster oven.’ …”
  • —Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better
  • and How They Can Change the World
  • “You get a sense of the scale and intricacy of the task by considering the sound effects alone: The game contains 54,000 pieces of audio and 40,000 lines of dialogue. There are 2,700 different noises for footsteps alone depending on whose foot is stepping on what.”
  • Sam Leith on Halo 3, from Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  • “The popularity of an unwinnable game like Tetris completely upends the stereotype that gamers are highly competitive people who care more about winning than anything else. Competition and winning are not defining traits of games—nor are they defining interests of the people who love to play them. Many gamers would rather keep playing than win. In high-feedback games, the state of being intensely engaged may ultimately be more pleasurable than the satisfaction of winning.”
  • —Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better
  • and How They Can Change the World
  • “Why Minecraft Is More Than Just Another Video Game”
  • “We had discussions about Boolean
  • logic [AND/OR/NOT, etc.], which is a pretty advanced concept to be talking to a 9-year-old about.” —Andrew Weekes (from BBC News Magazine)
  • “My initial reaction was that it was just another video game. Now I think of it as digital Lego, and he is using it to build all these amazing things.” —Christy Wyatt, CEO, Good Technology (from BBC News Magazine)
  • “Why Minecraft Is More Than Just Another Video Game”
  • “We had discussions about Boolean
  • logic [AND/OR/NOT, etc.], which is a pretty advanced concept to be talking to a 9-year-old about.” —Andrew Weekes (from BBC News Magazine)
  • “My initial reaction was that it was just another video game. Now I think of it as digital Lego, and he is using it to build all these amazing things.” —Christy Wyatt, CEO, Good Technology (from BBC News Magazine)
  • “Flash When I work with experimental digital gadgets, I am always reminded of how small changes in the details of a digital design can have profound unforeseen effects on the experiences of the people who are playing with it. The slightest change in something as seemingly trivial as the ease of use of a button can sometimes alter behavior patterns. For instance, Stanford University researcher Jeremy Bailinson has demonstrated that changing the height of one’s avatars in immersive virtual reality transforms self-esteem and social self-perception. Technologies are extensions of ourselves, and, like the avatars in Jeremy’s lab, our identities
  • can be shifted by the quirks of gadgets. It is impossible to
  • work with information technology without also engaging in
  • social engineering.” —Jaron Lanier, You Are Not a Gadget
  • BIG DATA
  • “[Michael Vassar/MetaMed founder] is creating a better information system and new class of people to manage it. Almost all healthcare people get is going to be donehopefully—
  • by algorithms within a decade or
  • two. We used to rely on doctors to be experts, and we’ve crowded them into being something like factory workers, where their job is to see one patient every 8 to 11 minutes and implement a by-the-book solution. I’m talking about creating a new ‘expert profession’—medical quants, almost like hedgefund managers, who could do the high-level analytical work of directing all the information that flows into the world’s hard drives. Doctors would now be aided by Vassar’s new information experts who would be aided by advanced artificial intelligence.”—New York /0624.13
  • “[These HP] pioneers may not realize just how big a shift this practice is from a cultural standpoint. The computer is doing more than obeying the usual mechanical orders to retain facts and figures. It’s producing new information that’s so powerful, it must be handled with a new kind of care. We’re in a new world in which systems not only divine new, important information, but must carefully manage it as well.” —Eric Siegel, Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die (based on a real case, an HP “Flight risk” PA model developed by HR, with astronomical savings potential)
  • The Crowd Sourced Performance Review
  • “By harnessing the ‘wisdom of crowds,’ many subjective observations taken together provide a more objective and accurate picture of an employee’s performance than a single subjective judgement. It averages out prejudice or baggage on the part of both manager and employee.” —Eric Mosley, The Crowd Sourced Performance Review
  • “Analytics can yield literally hundreds of millions of data points—far too many for human intuition to make any sense of the data. So in conjunction with the ability to store very big data about online behavior, researchers have developed strong tools for data mining, statistically evaluating correlations between many types and sources of data to expose hidden patterns and connections. The patterns predict human behavior—and even hidden human motivations.” —Illah Reza Nourbakhsh,
  • Professor of Robotics, Carnegie Mellon, Robot Futures
  • “Workers at Hart-Hanks call center who were selected by Evolv* missed about 29% fewer hours of work in their first six months and handled calls 15% faster than those who had been hired before.” —Bloomberg Businessweek (“Hiring in the Age of Big Data”)
  • *Evolv uses questionnaires based on Big Data observations of characteristic associated with performance, turnover, etc. E.g., job-hopping past unrelated to length of coming stay. “As human beings, we’re actually pretty bad at evaluating other human beings.”
  • —David Ostberg, Evolv, VP for “workforce science”
  • “Predictions based on correlations lie at the heart of big data.”
  • Source: Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier
  • “Flash forward to dystopia. You work in a chic cubicle, sucking chicken-flavor sustenance from
  • a tube. You’re furiously maneuvering with a joystick … Your boss stops by and gives you a look. ‘We need to talk about your loyalty to this company.’ The organization you work for has deduced that you are considering quitting. It predicts your plans and intentions, possibly before you have even conceived them.” —Eric Siegel, Predictive Analytics:
  • The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die (based on a real case, an
  • HP “Flight risk” PA model developed by HR, with astronomical savings potential)
  • EVERYTHING.
  • EVERYWHERE.
  • “Robotics will drive this very innovation. Landing page tuning will bust out of the Internet and become ‘interaction tuning.’ Companies will apply their analytics engines to all interaction opportunities with people everywhere: online, in the car, in a supermarket isle, on the sidewalk, and of course in your home.” —Illah Reza Nourbakhsh, Professor of Robotics, Carnegie Mellon, Robot Futures
  • The “Internet of THINGS”
  • “Internet of Things”: “The algorithms created by Nest’s machine-learning experts—and the troves of data generated by those algorithms—are just as important as the sleek materials carefully selected by its industrial designers. By tracking its users and subtly influencing their behaviors, Nest Learning Thermostat transcends its pedestrian product category. Nest has similar hopes for what has always been a prosaic device, the smoke alarm. Yes, the Nest Protect does what every similar device does—goes off when smoke or CO reaches dangerous levels—but it does much more, by using sensors to distinguish between smoke and steam, Internet connectivity to tell you where the danger is, a calculated tone of voice to convey a personality, and warm lighting to guide you in the darkness.
  • In other words, Nest isn’t only about beautifying the thermostat or adding features to the lowly smoke detector. ‘We’re about creating the conscious home,’ Nest CEO Fadell .” Left unsaid is a grander vision, with even bigger implications, many devices sensing the environment, talking to one another, and doing our bidding unprompted.”
  • Source: “Where There’s Smoke …”, Steven Levy, Wired, NOV 2013
  • Power!
  • “Flash When I work with experimental digital gadgets, I am always reminded of how small changes in the details of a digital design can have profound unforeseen effects on the experiences of the people who are playing with it. The slightest change in something as seemingly trivial as the ease of use of a button can sometimes alter behavior patterns. For instance, Stanford University researcher Jeremy Bailinson has demonstrated that changing the height of one’s avatars in immersive virtual reality transforms self-esteem and social self-perception. Technologies are extensions of ourselves, and, like the avatars in Jeremy’s lab, our identities
  • can be shifted by the quirks of gadgets. It is impossible to work with information technology without also engaging in social engineering.” —Jaron Lanier,
  • You Are Not a Gadget
  • “Human level capability has not turned out to be a special stopping point from an engineering perspective. ….”
  • Source: Illah Reza Nourbakhsh, Professor of Robotics, Carnegie Mellon, Robot Futures
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe …
  • About halfway through 2012, I concluded that I needed to take a self-taught study break—to assess the increasing strange world around us. About 50 books later—and hundreds of hours spent, uncharacteristically, staring into space from a hill on my farm in Vermont—what follows appeared. There is no effort to tie it to substantial references. The bedrock is there … but my goal, in summary form here, was to try
  • to write down what I think, or, rather, what I think I’m coming to think.
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe
  • 1. The power to invent (and execute) is switching/flipping rapidly/inexorably to the network. “Me” is transitioning to “We”—as consumers and producers. Nouns are giving way to gerunds—it’s an “ing”/shapeshifting world!
  • 2. The Internet must stay open and significantly unregulated to enable, among other things, the entrepreneurial spurt that will significantly underpin world economic growth.
  • 3. Entrepreneurial behavior and upstart entrepreneurial enterprises have underpinned every monster shift in the past, such as farm to factory. This time will likely be no different.
  • 4. An obsession with a “Fortune 500” of more or less stable giants dictating “the way we do things” will likely become an artifact of the past. (Though big companies/"utilities" will not disappear.)
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe
  • 5. There is simply no limit to invention or entrepreneurial opportunities! (Please read twice.)
  • 6. The new star bosses will be “wizards”/“maestros.”
  • 7. Sources of sustained profitability will often be elusive in a “soft-services world.”
  • 8. Control and accountability will be a delicate dance. Now you see it, now you don't ...
  • 9. Trial and error, many many many trials and many many many errors very very very rapidly will be the rule; tolerance for and delight in rapid learning—and unlearning—will be a/the most valued skill.
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe
  • 10. “Gamers” instinctively “get” the idea of lots of trials, lots of errors, as fast as possible; for this reason among many, “the revolution” is/will be to a very significant degree led by youth.
  • 11. Women may well flourish to the point of domination in new leadership roles in these emergent/ethereal settings that dominate the landscape—power will be exercised almost entirely indirectly (routine for most women—more than for their male counterparts), and will largely/elusively inhabit the network per se.
  • 12. The “Brand You/Brand Me” idea is alive and well and getting healthier every day and is … not optional. Fact is, we mostly all will have to behave/be entrepreneurial tapdancers to survive let alone thrive. (Again, the under-35 set already seem mostly to get this; besides, this was the norm until 90 years ago.)
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe
  • 13. Individual performance and accountability will be more important than ever, but will be measured by one’s peers along dimensions such as reliability, trustworthiness, engagement, flexibility, willingness to spend a majority of one’s time helping others with no immediate expected return.
  • 14. AI is ripping through traditional jobs at an accelerating pace. Virtually no job, circa 2000, no matter how “high end,” will remain in a recognizable way within 15-25 years. It’s as simple—and as traumatic—as that.
  • 15. Wholesale/continuous/intense re-education (forgetting as well as learning) is a lifelong pursuit/imperative; parent Goal #1: Don’t kill the curiosity with which the child is born!
  • Circa 2013: Coming to Believe
  • 16. STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Math) is no doubt significant to a being transformed by technology, though it has severe limitations. I favor the somewhat more robust formulation labeled STEAM/steAm. The “A” is for Art, or the arts. “The arts” are to some extent “what’s left” in terms of value creation as AI/robotics vacuum up traditional high-end occupations—think Apple.
  • 17. The surprisingly good news: Education is busily re-inventing itself and leaving the ed establishment in the dust! The idea of and shape of education per se are erasing all that’s come before.
  • 18. GRIN/Genetics-Robotics-Informatics-Nanotech: Overwhelming transformation is hardly just the provenance of AI/Robotics. Change, entrepreneurial activities and early adoption in the “G”/genetics and the “N”/nanotech arenas are accelerating. In fact, our 25 year horizon may border on the unrecognizable.



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