Tom Peters’ Re-Imagine excellence!



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Press Ganey Assoc: 139,380 former patients from 225 hospitals: NONE of THE top 15 factors determining Patient Satisfaction referred to patient’s health outcome. Instead: directly related to Staff Interaction; directly correlated with Employee Satisfaction Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

“There is a misconception that supportive interactions require more staff or more time and are therefore more costly. Although labor costs are a substantial part of any hospital budget, the interactions themselves add nothing to the budget. KINDNESS IS FREE. Listening to patients or answering their questions costs nothing. It can be argued that negative interactions—alienating patients, being non-responsive to their needs or limiting their sense of control—can be very costly. … Angry, frustrated or frightened patients may be combative, withdrawn and less cooperative—requiring far more time than it would have taken to interact with them initially in a positive way.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel (Griffin Hospital/Derby CT; Plantree Alliance)

  • K = R = P
  • Kindness =
  • Repeat Business =
  • Profit.
  • K = R = P/Kindness = Repeat business = Profit
  • Kindness:
  • Kind.
  • Thoughtful.
  • Decent.
  • Caring.
  • Attentive.
  • Engaged.
  • Listens well/obsessively.
  • Appreciative.
  • Open.
  • Visible.
  • Honest.
  • Responsive.
  • On time all the time.
  • Apologizes with dispatch for screw-ups.
  • “Over”-reacts to screw-ups of any magnitude.
  • “Professional” in all dealings.
  • Optimistic.
  • Understands that kindness to staff breeds kindness to others/outsiders.
  • Applies throughout the “supply chain.”
  • Applies to 100% of customer’s staff.
  • Explicit part of values statement.
  • Basis for evaluation of 100% of our staff.
  • Kindness … WORKS!
  • Kindness … PAYS!
  • The Manager’s Book of Decencies: How Small Gestures Build Great Companies. —Steve Harrison, Adecco
  • Responsiveness/
  • Apology/
  • “I’m sorry!”

3

  • “I regard apologizing as the most magical, healing, restorative gesture human beings can make. It is the centerpiece of my work with executives who want to get better.”
  • —Marshall Goldsmith, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There:
  • How Successful People Become Even More Successful.
  • With a new and forthcoming policy on apologies … Toro, the lawn mower folks, reduced the average cost of settling a claim from $115,000 in 1991 to $35,000 in 2008 … and the company hasn’t been to trial in the last15 years!
  • Relationships (of all varieties): THERE ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A THREE-MINUTE PHONE CALL WOULD HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE.*
  • *divorce, loss of a BILLION $$$ aircraft sale, etc., etc.
  • THE PROBLEM IS RARELY/NEVER THE PROBLEM. THE RESPONSE TO THE PROBLEM INVARIABLY ENDS UP BEING THE REAL PROBLEM.*
  • *PERCEPTION IS ALL THERE IS!
  • Comeback
  • [big, quick response]
  • >>
  • Perfection
  • Acquire vs. maintain:
  • 5X*
  • *Hence: Service >> Sales (!!)
  • “We”
  • Observed closely: The use of “I” or “We” during a
  • job interview.
  • Source: Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman, chapter 6, “Hiring for Values,”
  • Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
  • "It became necessary to develop medicine as a cooperative science; the clinician, the specialist, the laboratory workers, the nurses uniting for the good of the patient, each assisting in the elucidation of the problem at hand, and each dependent upon the other for support.”
  • —Dr. William Mayo, 1910
  • “Competency is irrelevant if we don’t share common values.” —Mayo Clinic exec, from Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman, “Orchestrating the Clues of Quality,” Chapter 7 from Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
  • "The personnel committees on all three campuses have become aggressive in addressing the issue of physicians who are not living the Mayo value of exhibiting respectful, collegial behavior to all team members. Some physicians have been suspended without pay or terminated.” —Leonard Barry & Kent Seltman,
  • Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic
  • "It The teamwork, partnerships, and integration that I took for granted, the culture of Mayo clinic that permeates this place is incredibly unique.”
  • —Johnathon Cartwright, senior administrator, Mayo Clinic,
  • upon returning to Mayo following a stint as CAO
  • of a major medical centerDr
  • “A Mayo surgeon recalled an incident that occurred shortly after he had joined the Mayo surgical staff. He was seeing patients in the Clinic one afternoon when he received from one of the most experienced and renown surgeons on the Mayo Clinic staff. The senior surgeon stated over the phone that that he was in the operating room performing a complex procedure. He explained the findings and asked his junior colleague whether or not what he, the senior was planning seemed appropriate. The junior surgeon was dumbfounded that that he would receive a call like this. Nonetheless, a few minutes of discussion ensued, a decision was made, and the senior surgeon proceeded with the operation. … A major consequence was that the junior surgeon learned the importance of inter-operative consultation for the patient’s benefit even among surgeons with many years of surgical experience.’” —Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman , “Practicing Team Medicine,” Chapter 3 from Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
  • "When I was in medical school, I spent hundreds of hours looking into a microscope—a skill I never needed to know or ever use. Yet I didn't have a single class that taught me communication or teamwork skillssomething I need every day I walk into the hospital.” —Peter Pronovost, Safe Patients, Smart Hospitals
  •  
  • “I am hundreds
  • of times better here [than in my prior hospital assignment] because of the support system. It’s like you were working in an organism; you are not a single cell when you are out there practicing.’” —quote from Dr. Nina Schwenk, in Chapter 3, “Practicing Team Medicine,” from Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman,
  • from Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
  • … hundreds of times better here …
  • Every week every swimmer reports on how he helped a teammate
  • Source: Skip Kenney, Stanford men’s swimming coach,
  • 31 consecutive PAC10 championships, 7 NCAA championships
  • “We”
  • Observed closely: The use of “I” or “We” during a
  • job interview.
  • Source: Leonard Berry & Kent Seltman, chapter 6, “Hiring for Values,”
  • Management Lessons From Mayo Clinic
  • “We”
  • Every week every swimmer reports on how he helped a teammate
  • Source: Skip Kenney, Stanford men’s swimming coach,
  • 31 consecutive PAC10 championships, 7 NCAA championships
  • R.O.I.R.



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