Tom Peters’ excellence. Always. Xalways. Long. 1339. 05October2006 X. Al excellence. Always. Slides* at … tompeters com *also “long” The Irreducible209+/ Sales122/60tibs



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“We design intelligent strategies—but they fall miles short of their for one reason. Poor organizational effectiveness which in turn leads to a gaping ‘implementation deficit.’ Tom, I want you to get a handle on the best thinking and best practices from around the world.” —Ron Daniel (1977*) *TP/1977/first (?) Stanford Ph.D. thesis studying implementation per se.

1979-2006 Still missing after all these years …

“Ninety percent of what we call ‘management’ consists of making it difficult for people to get things done.”Peter Drucker

TP/BW on BigCo Sin #1: “too much talk, too little do”

  • Excellence1982: The Bedrock “Eight Basics”
  • 1. A Bias for Action
  • 2. Close to the Customer
  • 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship
  • 4. Productivity Through People
  • 5. Hands On, Value-Driven
  • 6. Stick to the Knitting
  • 7. Simple Form, Lean Staff
  • 8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight
  • Properties”
  • “Never forget implementation boys. In our work it’s what I call the ‘missing 98 percent’ of the client puzzle.” —Al McDonald, former Managing Director, McKinsey & Co, to a project team that included TP

“Operations is policy.” —Fred Malek (1974) “Execution is strategy.” —TP (1983)

“METABOLIC MANAGEMENT”

The Leadership11 1. Talent Management 2. Metabolic Management 3. Technology Management 4. Barrier Management 5. Forgetful Management 6. Metaphysical Management 7. Opportunity Management 8. Portfolio Management 9. Failure Management 10. Cause Management 11. Passion Management

“The secret of fast progress is inefficiency, fast and furious and numerous failures.” —Kevin Kelly

“Active mutators in placid times tend to die off. They are selected against. Reluctant mutators in quickly changing times are also selected against.” —Carl Sagan & Ann Druyan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

“How we feel about the evolving future tells us who we are as individuals and as a civilization: Do we search for stasisa regulated, engineered world? Or do we embrace dynamisma world of constant creation, discovery and competition? Do we value stability and control or evolution and learning? Do we think that progress requires a central blueprint, or do we see it as a decentralized, evolutionary process?? Do we see mistakes as permanent disasters, or the correctable byproducts of experimentation? Do we crave predictability or relish surprise? These two poles, stasis and dynamism, increasingly define our political, intellectual and cultural landscape.” —Virginia Postrel, The Future and Its Enemies

“If things seem under control, you’re just not going fast enough.” —Mario Andretti

“The most successful people are those who are good at plan B.” —James Yorke, mathematician, on chaos theory in The New Scientist

“I’m not comfortable unless I’m uncomfortable.” —Jay Chiat

“If it works, it’s obsolete.” —Marshall McLuhan

Boyd on TEMPO

He who has the quickest O.O.D.A. Loops* wins! *Observe. Orient. Decide. Act./Col. John Boyd

“The stuff has got to be implicit. If it is explicit, you can’t do it fast enough.” —John Boyd BOYD: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War (Robert Coram)

Tempo!* 70-10 *Boyd/O.O.D.A. Loops/Mike Leach/Texas Tech

70-10/Nebraska/ Unk QB 643 yards K.State/ Linemen spread wide/All legals go out for pass/Defenders confused & tire (Boyd/Tempo is not speed/“Re-arrange the mind of the enemy”—T.E. Lawrence)/ “By changing the geometry of the game, and pushing the limits of space and time on the gridiron, Mike Leach is taking Texas Tech to some far out places.” —Michael Lewis (NY Times ,on Mike Leach/Texas Tech)

“In war, delay is fatal.” —Napoleon “The only way to whip an army is to go out and fight it.” —Grant “ … demonstrating the tactic that would become his hallmark: the immediate move to seek out the enemy and attack him” —John Mosier, on Grant “A good plan executed right now is far preferable to a ‘perfect’ plan executed next week.” —Patton

Relentless!* *Churchill, Grant, Patton, Welch, Bossidy, Nardelli (GE execs), UPS, FedEx, Microsoft/Gates-Ballmer, Eisner, Weill, eBay, Nixon-Kissinger, Gerstner, Rice, Jordan, Armstrong

VALUE ADDED #7A

EXCELLENCE. ACTION. ROOTS.

GRANT NELSON BOYD FISHER BOSSIDY PEROT MASTERS HERB McDONALD PETERS-WATERMAN HAMLET+

GRANT

“The only way to whip an army is to go out and fight it.” —Grant Source: John Mosier, Grant

  • “A generation of American officers had been schooled to believe the art of generalship required rigid adherence to certain textbook theorems.”/151 “The nature of Grant’s greatness has been a riddle to many observers. … did not hedge his bets … disregarded explicit instructions … nothing to fall back on … violating every maxim held dear by the military profession … new dimension: ability to learn from the battlefield … finished near the bottom of his [West Point] class in tactics … carried the fight to the enemy … maintain the momentum of the attack … military greatness is the ability to recognize and respond to opportunities presented.”/152-3 “Grant had an aversion to digging in.”/153 “Grant had an intangible advantage. He knew what he wanted.”/153 “Grant’s seven-mile dash changed the course of the war.”/157 “The one who attacks first will be victorious.”/158 “dogged”/159 “unconditional surrender”/162 “simplicity and determination”/166 “quickness of mind that allowed him to make on the spot adjustments … [his] battles were not elegant set-piece operations”/166 “[other Union general] preferred preparation to execution … became a friend of detail … suffered from ‘the slows’ …”/170 Message to Halleck from McClellan: “Do not hesitate to arrest him” [following great victory]/172 … “learned how to withstand attacks from the rear” [Army politics]/179
  • “He never credited the enemy with the capacity to take the offensive.”/185 “tenacity [like Wellington]”/187 “I haven’t despaired of whipping them yet” [at a very low point]/195 “Both sides seemed defeated and whoever assumed the offensive was sure to win.”/200 … “inchoate bond [between Grant and soldiers]”/201 … “The genius of Grant’s command style lay in its simplicity. Grant never burdened his division commanders with excessive detail. … no elaborate staff conferences, no written orders prescribing deployment. … Grant recognized the battlefield was in flux. By not specifying movements in detail, he left his subordinate commanders free to exploit whatever opportunities developed.”/202 “If anyone other than Grant had been in command, the Union army certainly would have retreated.”/204 Lincoln (urged to fire Grant): “I can’t spare this man; he fights.”/205 “Grant turned defeat into Union victory.”/206 “moved on intuition, which he often could not explain or justify.”/208 “instinctive recognition that victory lay in relentlessly hounding a defeated army into surrender.”/213 Nathan Bedford Forrest, successful Confederate commander: “amenable to no known rules of procedure, was a law unto himself for all military acts, and was constantly doing the unexpected at all times
  • and places.”/213
  • “The genius of Grant’s command style lay in its simplicity. Grant never burdened his division commanders with excessive detail. … no elaborate staff conferences, no written orders prescribing deployment. … Grant recognized the battlefield was in flux. By not specifying movements in detail, he left his subordinate commanders free to exploit whatever opportunities developed.”
  • —Jean Edward Smith/GRANT
  • “The commanding general would be in the field”/228 Lincoln: “What I want, and what the people want, is generals who will fight battles and win victories. Grant has done this and I propose to stand by him.”/231 “retains his hold upon the affections of his men”/232 “Grant’s moral courage—his willingness to choose a path from which there could be no return—set him apart from most commanders … were [Grant and Lee] were uniquely willing to take full responsibility for their actions.”/233 “ … modest … honest … nothing could perturb … never faltered …”/233 “plan was breathtakingly simple but fraught with peril”/235 “demonstrating the flexibility that had become his hallmark”/238 “But like any West Point trained general, he had difficulty comprehending what Grant was up to …”/240 “recognized the value of momentum … throw off balance … blitzkrieg … traveling light … headquarters in the saddle”/243 “acted as quartermaster”/243 [rushed away so that he couldn’t receive Halleck’s order] … “like Lord Nelson … telescope to his blind eye” … “pressing ahead on his own”/245 “focus on the enemy’s weakness rather than his own”/250
  • “recognized the value of momentum … throw [opponent] off balance … blitzkrieg … traveling light … headquarters in the saddle” —Jean Edward Smith/GRANT
  • “The art of war does not require complicated maneuvers; the simplest are the best, and common sense is fundamental. From which one might wonder how it is generals make blunders; it is because they try to be clever.” —Napoleon on Simplicity, from Napoleon
  • on Project Management by Jerry Manas.

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