Titleiii technology Literacy Challenge Grant



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TitleIII Technology Literacy Challenge Grant

Learning Unit


Overview | Content Knowledge | Essential Questions | Connection To Standards | Initiating Activity | Learning Experiences | Culminating Performance | Pre-Requisite Skills | Modifications | Schedule/Time Plan | Technology Use

LU Title: Lyddie

Author(s): Joann Chambers

Grade Level: 7

School : AAK Middle School, Potsdam

Topic/Subject Area: ELA

* See parallel unit, Reforms of the Mid-1800’s, by Randy Burlingame, Social Studies

Address: Outer Lawrence Avenue, Potsdam, NY 13676


Email: chambers@slic.com


Phone/Fax: (315) 265-2004 ext. 494

OVERVIEW

Students will read the novel Lyddie while studying the reform movements of the 1800’s in social studies class. A series of before, during, and after strategies will help insure students comprehend what they read and focus on key social studies ideas. In addition, students will read and listen to several non-fiction articles relevant to the time period. Extending and refining learning experiences will challenge students to think beyond the events of the novel. The meaningful use task will be done in collaboration with the social studies teacher.

 

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE



Declarative

Procedural




Women’s Suffrage

Writing a Comparison/Contrast Essay




Abolition

Writing a Lyric Poem




Underground Railroad

Writing a Persuasive Speech




Fugitive Slave Laws

Writing a Literary Essay




Labor Unions

 




1st Person Point of View

 




Lyric Poem




Propaganda Techniques






ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  1. How do tough times change a person?

  2. What would you be willing to sacrifice to realize a dream?

  3. Is there more than one kind of slavery?

 

CONNECTIONS TO NYS LEARNING STANDARDS


List Standard # and Key Idea #: Write out related Performance Indicator(s) or Benchmark(s)

English Language Arts Standard 1: Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking for Information and Understanding

  • Identify appropriate format for sharing information with intended audience and comply with the accepted features of that format.

  • Support ideas with examples, definitions, analogies, and direct references to the text

  • Use the conventions of the presentational format for a persuasive speech.

  • Use format and language appropriate to the audience.

  • Use volume, tone, pitch, and rate appropriate to content and audience

  • Use effective nonverbal communication

  • Use visual aids to enhance the presentation

  • Establish and maintain eye contact with the audience

Standard 2: Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking for Literary Response and Expression

  • Interpret characters, plot, setting, theme, and dialogue, using evidence from the text

  • Identify social context and other characteristics of the time period in order to enhance understanding and appreciation of text

  • Compare a video version of a literary work with the written version

  • Write an interpretive essay that draws conclusions using specific references from the text for support

  • Select a genre (lyric poetry) and use appropriate conventions

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

  • Identify techniques an author uses to persuade; for example emotional and ethical appeals.

INITIATING ACTIVITY

Students will participate in a carousel brainstorming activity. Large sheets of newsprint paper with the following headings: slavery, women’s rights, mental illness, and industrial revolution will be placed around the room. In small groups, students will rotate form one chart to the next, pausing for several minutes at each chart to brainstorm and record what they know about each topic. Each group has a different color marker. Groups end up back where they started.



 

LEARNING EXPERIENCES


In chronological order including acquisition experiences and extending/refining
experiences for all stated declarative and procedural knowledge.


Acquisition Experiences

  1. Before reading Chapters #1 and #2, students will participate in a Think-Pair-Share activity. The teacher will read aloud pages 1-3 of the novel Lyddie. The students will then be asked: “What can you learn about Lyddie and her mother through this incident?” After being given a minute or two to think, students will discuss their response with a partner. The whole class will then discuss the inferences that can be drawn.

  2. While reading Chapters #1 and #2, students will complete a cloze worksheet and a family tree of the novel’s characters.

  3. After reading Chapter #1 and #2, the class will discuss the events of those chapters. The teacher will point out the reference in Chapter #2 to women’s lack of legal rights. (Lyddie’s mother can’t sell the farm as long as her husband is alive.) Students will complete a paired reading/bookends activity. Before reading, students will be given the following questions: 1.) How were women discriminated against in the mid-late 1800’s? 2.) How were women who spoke out for their own rights treated by society? After reading the article “The Courage to Speak” (Cobblestone, March 1985), students will discuss their responses with their partner, and then with the whole class.

  4. While reading Chapters #3 – 5, students will complete a 3-2-1 worksheet. As they read, they will list 3 things Lyddie admires about the lady in the pink silk dress; 2 ways Charlie’s life is now different than Lyddie’s; 1 way Lyddie’s opinion of her father has changed.

  5. After reading Chapters #3 –5, the class will discuss the events of those chapters by sharing their responses from the 3-2-1 worksheet. Students will then complete a 5 words/3 words activity for the word freedom.

  6. While reading Chapters #6 and #7, students will complete a cause/effect graphic organizer.

  7. After reading Chapters #6 and #7, students will discuss the events of those chapters by sharing their responses to the cause/effect graphic organizer. In collaborative groups, students will complete a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the characters Lyddie and Ezekial.

  8. Before reading Chapters #8 and #9, students will work individually to complete the K and W columns of a KWL entitled “The Life of a Lowell Mill Girl”. Students will then share their responses with a partner. Finally, the class will discuss students’ responses.

  9. While reading Chapter #8 and #9, students will complete the L column of the KWL to show what they have learned about the life of a Lowell Mill girl.

  10. After reading Chapters #8 and #9, students will go on a “virtual field trip” by visiting websites that show pictures of textile mills in the 1800’s, as well as of the girls who worked in the mills during the time period. After viewing a variety of photos, students will complete “The Last Word” activity. Students will be given the acronym Lowell Mill, and will summarize what they know about the topic and then elaborate on those ideas to create phrases that start with each of the letters in the acronym.

  11. After reading Chapters #8 and #9, students will discuss what they learned about the life of a Lowell Mill girl by sharing their responses from the L column of their worksheets. Students will then listen to the article entitled “The Rise of the American Labor Unions” (Cobblestone magazine) and complete a graphic organizer. The “Ticket to Leave” will be a 50 Words or Less response to the question: How might Lyddie’s life change if a labor union formed at the mill?

  12. While reading Chapters #10 and #11, students will write the answers to several reading comprehension questions.

  13. After reading Chapters #10 and #11, students will discuss the events of those chapters by participating in a Think-Pair-Share activity. Students will be asked: How has the book Oliver changed Lyddie’s life?



  1. Before reading Chapters #12 and #13, students will complete a Wordsplash activity. Students will write five sentences predicting what will happen in the next two chapters.

  2. While reading Chapters #12 and #13, students will revise their Wordsplash sentences as needed to make all of the statements true statements.

  3. After reading Chapters #12 and #13, students will discuss the events of those chapters by sharing their revised Wordsplash sentences.

  4. While reading Chapters #14 and #15, students will complete a Sequence of Events graphic organizer.

  5. After reading Chapters #14 and #15, students will discuss the events of those chapters by reviewing their responses from the Sequence of Events graphic organizer.

  6. Because Lyddie’s mother suffers from mental illness and is subsequently institutionalized, students will explore the issue of the treatment of the mentally ill in the late 1800’s. Students will work in collaborative groups to read a biographical essay of Nellie Bly, using the Group Retellings reading strategy. Students will read silently to a designated point and then stop to retell what was just read. Finally, students will summarize what they learned about the life of Nellie Bly using the One-Word Summary strategy. Students will decide on one key word to represent or summarize Nellie Bly. The word can be an actual word or an invented word – one that serves as a mnemonic device to capture the ideas that are important to remember.

  7. While reading Chapters #14 and #15, students will write the responses to several reading comprehension questions.

  8. After reading Chapters #14 and #15, students will compare their answers to the reading comprehension questions using the Homework Checkers collaborative pairs strategy.

  9. Before reading Chapters #16 and #17, students will predict what is going to happen next by completing a Probable Passage worksheet in collaborative groups.

  10. While reading Chapters #16 and #17, students will make any necessary revisions to the probable passage worksheet to reflect the actual events of the chapters.

  11. After reading Chapters #16 and #17, students will discuss the events of the chapters by completing a Think-Pair-Share activity. Students will be asked to use evidence from the text to support the statement: Lyddie values education.

  12. Before reading Chapters #18 and #19, students will predict what will happen by completing a prediction guide. The guide will contain a list of possible events. Students will select those that they think are going to happen in the next two chapters and provide evidence from the text to support their choices.

  13. While reading Chapters #18 and #19, students will write responses to several reading comprehension questions.

  14. After reading Chapters #18 and #19, students will discuss the events of those chapters by completing a Think-Pair-Share activity. Students will be asked to respond to the question: Why do you think Lyddie has now decided to sign the petition?

  15. While reading Chapters #20 and #21, students will write responses to several reading comprehension questions.

  16. After reading Chapters #20 and #21, students will discuss the events of those chapters by reviewing their responses to the reading comprehension questions using the Homework Checkers collaborative pairs strategy. Students will read aloud the article “The ABC’s” (excerpt from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave reprinted in Cobblestone, February 1989.), stopping periodically to summarize what was read. The “Ticket to Leave” will be a 50 WOL response. Students will be given the quote from Frederick Douglass’s master, Mr. Auld, “If you give a nigger an inch, he would take an ell. A nigger should know nothing but to obey his master – to do as he is told to do. Learning would spoil the best nigger in the world. Now if you teach a nigger how to read, there would be no keeping him. It would forever unfit him to be a slave.” Students will be asked to respond to the question: Do you think Mr. Marsden would agree with this quote? Why or why not?

  17. While reading Chapters #22 and #23, students will write responses to reading comprehension questions.

  18. After reading Chapters #22 and #23, students will summarize the events of the story using the Circle Story Map graphic organizer. As a “Ticket to Leave”, students will write a 50 WOL response to the question: How does Lyddie come “full circle” through the course of the book?

Extending and Refining Experiences

  1. After reading Chapters #6 and #7 and completing a graphic organizer in collaborative groups, students will write a comparison/contrast essay. The teacher will model the essay writing procedure with a “Think Aloud”. The comparison/contrast essay will be graded using a rubric.

  2. After reading Chapters #12 and #13, students will listen to the pro-labor song “Union Maid”. Students will then work collaboratively to write a lyric poem that expresses the plight of the Lowell Mill girls. The lyric poem will be graded using a rubric.

  3. After reading Chapters #14 and #15, students will research the Underground Railroad using the internet. Students will then write a slave journal that traces one slave’s journey north. The journal will be graded using a rubric.

  4. After reading Chapters #18 and #19, student will work with a partner to write a short speech that Lyddie could deliver to the other girls at the boardinghouse to convince them to sign the petition. The speech will be graded using a rubric.

  5. After finishing the novel, students will work collaboratively to classify the characters from the book. Students will decided whether each character helped or hindered Lyddie in her quest. Students will provide specific evidence from the text to support their choices.

  6. After reading the novel, students will view the video Lyddie, and work collaboratively to complete a compare/contrast graphic organizer.

  7. After reading the novel, the students will write an essay showing how Lyddie changed throughout the course of the book. The essay will be graded using a rubric.



Rubric for Comparison/Contrast Essay




4

3

2

1

Meaning

Essay states thesis clearly. Student has selected appropriate characteristics on which to base the comparison of the two characters.

Essay states thesis clearly. Most characteristics are appropriate for comparison, but one superficial characteristic is used.

Essay states thesis, but not clearly. Some characteristics are appropriate for comparison, but some superficial characteristics are used.

Essay does not state the thesis. The selected characteristics are inappropriate and superficial means for comparison.

Development

Using specific evidence from the text, essay accurately explains how characters are similar and different with respect to the characteristics selected.

Essay uses some specific evidence from the text to accurately explain how characters are similar and different with respect to the characteristics selected.

Essay makes some references to the text, but specific evidence is not used to explain how the characters are similar and different with respect to the characteristics selected.

Essay makes no reference to the text, and uses no specific evidence to explain how the characters are similar and different with respect to the characteristics selected.

Organization

Essay contains an introduction, body, and conclusion. Transitions are used to connect paragraphs.

Essay contains an introduction, body, and conclusion. Some attempt has been made to use transitions.

Essay is missing either an introduction or a conclusion. No attempt has been made to use transitions.

Essay is all one paragraph, with no introduction or conclusion. There are no transitions used.

Language

Essay uses correct terminology to describe events, persons, places, etc. References to people, places, and events are specific and accurate.

Essay uses mostly correct terminology. There are one or two references that could have been more specific or accurate.

Essay uses some correct terminology to describe events, persons, places, etc. There are several references that could have been more specific or accurate.

Essay uses very little correct terminology to describe events, persons, places, etc. There are few or no specific and accurate references.

Conventions

Essay is error-free or contains one or two minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains three or four minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains several minor errors, and a few errors that interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains several errors that interfere with comprehension.

Lyric Poem Rubric




4

3

2

1

Meaning

The poem clearly expresses the speaker’s feelings about the subject of labor reform. using emotionally charged or figurative language.

The poem clearly expresses the speaker’s feelings about the subject of labor reform. The writers have attempted to use emotionally charged or figurative language.

The poem expresses the speaker’s feelings, but the feelings may not be clear. There has been no attempt to use emotionally charged or figurative language.

The poem does not express the speaker’s feelings about the subject of labor reform.

Language

The poem effectively uses emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The poem attempts to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The poem attempts to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The poem makes no attempt to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

Format

The poem contains at least two verses and a chorus. The use of rhythm and rhyme effectively gives the poem a musical quality.

The poem contains at least two verses and a chorus. Some attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

The poem contains at least one verse and a chorus. Some attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

The poem contains either one verse or a chorus. No attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

Conventions

Poem is error free or contains one or two errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Poem contains three or four errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Poem contains several minor errors including a few that interfere with comprehension.

Poem contains several errors that interfere with comprehension.

Lyddie’s Speech Rubric




4

3

2

1

Development

Opinions are adequately supported with specific details and examples from the text. One of the persuasive techniques is successfully employed.

Opinions are somewhat supported with specific details and examples from the text. One of the persuasive techniques is attempted.

An attempt has been made to support opinions with specific details and examples from the text or one of the persuasive techniques is attempted.

Opinions are not supported with examples or details from the text. None of the methods of persuasion is used.

Organization

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning, middle and end of speech.

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning and end of speech.

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning or end of the speech.


Speech does not state the desired outcome.

Conventions

Speech is error-free or contains one or two minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains three or four minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains several errors, a few of which interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains several errors which interfere with comprehension.

Final Essay Rubric




4

3

2

1

Meaning

Thesis statement in clearly stated.

Thesis is stated, but not clearly.




Thesis is not stated.

Development

Essay provides adequate support for main idea using specific and detailed references from the text.

Essay provides some support for main idea using specific and detailed references from the text.

Essay provides little support for the main idea using specific and detailed references from the text.

Essay provides no support for the main idea using specific and detailed references from the text.

Organization

Essay contains a clear introduction, body, and conclusion and stays focused on the main idea.

Essay contains an introduction, body, and conclusion, but introduction and conclusion could be better developed. Essay remains focused on the main idea.

Essay contains an introduction, body, and conclusion, but occasionally strays from the main idea.

Essay does not contain an introduction, body, and conclusion or frequently strays from the main idea.

Conventions

Essay is error-free or contains one or two error that do not interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains three or four minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains several errors, a few of which interfere with comprehension.

Essay contains several errors which interfere with comprehension.

CULMINATING PERFORMANCE
Include rubric(s)

After reading the novel Lyddie in English class, and completing the learning experiences involving the reform movements in social studies class, students will work in collaborative groups to create a simulation of a 19th century reform rally. Each of the five class sections will be assigned a topic of reform: Abolition, Women’s Suffrage, Labor Reform, Temperance, and Prison/Mental Hospital Reform. Within each class, small groups will work to create a product designed to inform and persuade the audience at the rally. One group will write a slogan and create posters. A second group will compose a song or rap to be performed at the rally. A third group will write an inspirational speech and select a representative to deliver the speech. A fourth group will design a pamphlet to be distributed among the crowd at the rally.

When all products have been completed, the entire 7th grade will gather for a mock reform rally. Each class will present their topic through the products they have created.



Finally, each student will be asked to write a letter to the editor about a reform topic other than the one their group worked with.

Rubric for Rally Poster




4

3

2

1

Focus

The slogan is prominently displayed on the poster, and the topic is very clear.

The slogan is prominently displayed on the poster, and the topic is somewhat clear.

The slogan is not prominently displayed on the poster, and the topic is somewhat unclear.

The slogan is not displayed on the poster at all, and the topic is very unclear.

Development

The main ideas are appropriate to the topic, presented correctly, and are supported with appropriate and accurate details.

Some of the main ideas are appropriate to the topic, and are presented correctly. Most of the details are accurate and appropriate.

A few of the main ideas are appropriate to the topic, and most ideas are presented correctly. Some of the details are accurate and appropriate.

Main ideas are lacking or are not correct. Few or no details are used.

Layout and Design

The overall organization, design, use of color, and use of space effectively help the poster to be interesting and communicate its overall message.

The overall organization, design, use of color, and space are somewhat effective in helping the poster to be interesting and communicate its overall message.

The overall organization, design, use of color and space are somewhat ineffective in helping the poster to be interesting and communicate its overall message.

The overall organization, design, use of color and space are very ineffective in helping the poster to be interesting and communicate its overall message.

Presentation

At the rally, demonstrators enthusiastically chant a catchy slogan, and prominently display the poster.

At the rally, demonstrators chant the slogan, but lack enthusiasm. The posters are prominently displayed.

At the rally, the demonstrators march, but do not vocalize. Posters are carried, but not prominently displayed.

At the rally, the demonstrators get stage fright and neither march nor carry their signs.

Rubric for Rally Song/Rap




4

3

2

1

Meaning

The song or rap clearly expresses the speaker’s feelings.




The song or rap expresses the speaker’s feelings, but the feelings may not be clear.

The song or rap does not express the speaker’s feelings about the subject.

Language

The song or rap effectively uses emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The song or rap attempts to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The song or rap attempts to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

The song or rap makes no attempt to use emotionally charged or figurative language to affect the meaning.

Format

The song or rap contains at least two verses and a chorus. Rhyme and rhythm and use effectively.

The song or rap contains at least two verses and a chorus. Some attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

The song or rap contains at least one verse and a chorus. Some attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

The song or rap contains either one verse or a chorus. No attempt has been made to use rhythm and rhyme.

Conventions

The song or rap is error free or contains one or two errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

The song or rap contains three or four errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

The song or rap contains several minor errors including a few that interfere with comprehension.

The song or rap contains several errors that interfere with comprehension.


Presentation

The song or rap is performed with great energy and enthusiasm. Music or movement that is used enhances the message in a positive way.

The song or rap is performed with some energy and enthusiasm. There is some attempt to enhance the message with music or movement.

The song or rap is performed with little energy and enthusiasm. There is little attempt to enhance the message with music or movement.

The song or rap is performed with no energy and enthusiasm. There has been no attempt to enhance the message with music or movement.

Rubric for Rally Speech




4

3

2

1

Development

Opinions are adequately supported with specific details and examples from the text. One of the persuasive techniques is successfully employed.

Opinions are somewhat supported with specific details and examples from the text. One of the persuasive techniques is attempted.

An attempt has been made to support opinions with specific details and examples from the text or one of the persuasive techniques is attempted.

Opinions are not supported with examples or details from the text. None of the methods of persuasion is used.

Organization

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning, middle and end of speech.

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning and end of speech.

Speech states the desired outcome at the beginning or end of the speech.


Speech does not state the desired outcome.

Conventions

Speech is error-free or contains one or two minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains three or four minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains several errors, a few of which interfere with comprehension.

Speech contains several errors which interfere with comprehension.

Presentation


Volume, tone, pitch and rate are appropriate. Nonverbal gestures do not distract from the message. Eye contact is maintained with the audience.

Volume, tone, pitch, and rate are somewhat appropriate. Nonverbal gestures do not seriously distract from the message. Eye contact is maintained with the audience, for the most part.

Volume, tone, pitch, and rate are somewhat inappropriate. Nonverbal gestures somewhat distract from the message. Eye contact is rarely made with the audience.

Volume, tone, pitch, and rate are very inappropriate. Nonverbal gestures are very distracting. No eye contact is made with the audience.



Rubric for Rally Pamphlet




4

3

2

1

Format

Pamphlet contains a clear “call to action”

Pamphlet contains a “call to action” but it is somewhat unclear.

Pamphlet contains a “call to action” but it is very unclear

Pamphlet does not include a “call to action.”

Development

Many specific reasons and examples are given to support the call to action.

Many reasons and examples are given, but they could be more specific.

A few reasons and examples are given, but they are not specific.

No reasons or examples are given.

Language

Language is effectively persuasive and includes many emotionally charged words.

Language is somewhat persuasive and contains some emotionally charged words.

Some attempt has been made to use persuasion. A few emotionally charged words are used.

No attempt has been made to use persuasion or emotionally charged words.

Conventions

Pamphlet is error-free or contains one or two minor errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Pamphlet contains three or four errors that do not interfere with comprehension.

Pamphlet contains several errors including a few that interfere with comprehension.

Pamphlet contains several errors which seriously interfere with comprehension.

PRE-REQUISITE SKILLS

Before working on this unit, students will have been given a brief orientation to internet navigation.



MODIFICATIONS

An audio tape of the novel, Lyddie will be made available to students who work in the Resource Room and Title I reading class so that students who find the novel difficult can listen to the tape as they read. Modifications on Individual Educational Plans (IEP) will be followed with the support of the resource room and Title I staff. These modifications change from year to year, depending on the students assigned to the class. The teacher will be available during study hall and after school for those students needing additional time to complete the work.


UNIT SCHEDULE/TIME PLAN

The unit would take place over 3-4 weeks during English and social studies classes. Each class period is 40 minutes in length and meets 5 days per week.

 

TECHNOLOGY USE


Students will be taken to the computer lab to complete the “virtual field trip” to the Lowell mills, and to visit websites in planning the “Slave Journal”.
Web site for Lowell Mills:
Web sites for researching the Underground Railroad:

http://www.ugrr.org

http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smithsonian/issues96/oct96/undergroundrr.html

Students will use a desktop publishing program to create the pamphlets for the reform rally.



 

 



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