Thesis Statements Women in Mythology Essay



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Name:

Haflin


Humanities (2)

Date:


Thesis Statements Women in Mythology Essay

(Main Idea + complete Identification)

THIS IS ONLY A MODEL

MI (THESIS STATEMENT)

When the Mycenaens conquered the Minoans, their male dominated beliefs infiltrated their predecessors’ female dominated beliefs. To enforce their patriarchy, the Mycenaens used myths to portray woman as inferior to man.
DIS (DEVLOPING IDEAS)

Many myths illustrate females as jealous, overly curious, and the bringers of pain and suffering to mankind.





Problem Thesis Statements
The Mycenaean beliefs infiltrated the Minoan culture by destroying their female dominated beliefs.
Women are most often portrayed in Greek mythology as inferior to man. The myths depict woman as overly curious, jealous and obsessive, as well as bringing pain and suffering unto man.
In Greek mythology, women are portrayed inferior to their male counterparts. Women are usually smeared as being untrustworthy, jealous, or overly curious and easily duped.


Lead-Ins
When leading into a direct quotation (DQ) or a developmental detail (DD), lead-ins should not only provide the context of the example but the emotional quality of the detail as well. This is especially true if the DQ is dialogue. Carefully chosen verbs can reveal the emotional condition of a character and his or her tone of voice. A thoughtfully worded, revealing lead-in also helps your analysis & interpretation, which appears after the DQ.
Pay attention to careful word choice (diction) that is appropriate to the DQ you are introducing. Avoid simple, unrevealing verbs such as “states,“ “says,” or “shows” (“Christopher shows”, “Christopher states ”, etc.).
A lead-in’s function is to provide the context of the detail so that the flow from the lead-in to the example is smooth. Basically, a lead in should offer information about who is speaking or involved, where or when it is happening, and what is happening. (It is the who, what, when, where of the example)



Alternatives to “States”/”Says”/”Shows”:

All of these words have some emotional connotation to them,

so choose your words carefully.
implies depicts illustrates portrays conjures

reveals insists demands suggests whispers

admits confesses denounces praises encourages

persists requests mocks refuses inspires

YOU GET THE IDEA



POOR LEAD INS:

(1) This is revealed in the myth Pandora.


(2) An example of this would be Metis.
(3) Secondly, Niobe is a famous, beautiful queen, Zeus’s granddaughter, and has 14 children.

BETTER LEAD INS that INTEGRATE with DDs:


Remember, some lead in will set up a direct quotation while

some lead ins will ease into a paraphrased example.




(1) Through the myth “Pandora,” women possess an irresistible curiosity that becomes detrimental to mankind. When Epimetheus gives Pandora a jar of evils, she is told not to open it. However, her curiosity overwhelms her. She opens the jar, and all sickness and evil plague mankind. (This lead in eases into a paraphrased DD)
Who is involved: Pandora, Epimetheus, Zeus, mankind

When/where does it happen: in the myth “Pandora”

What is happening: Pandora is given a jar of ills and told not to open it, but her

curiosity (DI) overwhelms her



Emotional Value of Example: Pandora is unaware of the jar’s importance,

Epimetheus is charmed by her beauty, Zeus wants to punish man


(2) In “Metis and Athena”, women are clearly vulnerable and easily tricked to suit a man’s desire. Since Zeus wants to prevent his son’s birth, he “flattered [Metis] with honeyed conniving questions” (44). Ever eager to please her husband, Metis complied, and Zeus “immediately caught her in his hands and swallowed her” (44). (This lead in sets up and incorporated the DQ smoothly)


Who is involved: Metis, Zeus

When/where does it happen: In the myth “Metis and Athena”

What is happening: Zeus wants to prevent his son from being born, so he

manipulates Metis (DI) so he can swallow her



Emotional Value of Example: Metis just wants to please Zeus, Zeus is knowingly

tricking her

Analysis

Avoiding “This quote shows….”


Choosing and introducing direct quotes and examples is very important, however, you need to pay attention to how you transition from your example to your Analysis & Interpretation. The ultimate goal here is to avoid the DREADED, “This quote shows…” (or “This quote elucidates…”, or “This quote exemplifies…”, or any fancy variation thereof).
Here are examples with good lead-ins but poor transitions into A/I:
(1) Through the myth “Pandora,” women possess an irresistible curiosity that becomes detrimental to mankind. When Epimetheus gives Pandora a jar of evils, she is told not to open it. However, her curiosity overwhelms her. She opens the jar, and all sickness and evil plague mankind. This myth explains how women are overly curious and that curiosity destroys mankind.

(2) In “Metis and Athena”, women are clearly vulnerable and easily tricked to suit a man’s desire. Since Zeus wants to prevent his son’s birth, he “flattered [Metis] with honeyed conniving questions” (44). Ever eager to please her husband, Metis complied, and Zeus “immediately caught her in his hands and swallowed her” (44). This shows how easily women can be tricked.


NOTICE THE A/I IN EACH IS NOT SMOOTH. IT JUST REPEATS THE EXAMPLE WITHOUT ANY CRITICAL THINKING. IT LEAVES OUT THE DD’s “GOLDEN NUGGET.”

Analysis (cont’d)

Targeting the evidence and connecting it to DI
AFTER:

(1) Through the myth “Pandora,” women possess an irresistible curiosity that becomes detrimental to mankind. When Epimetheus gives Pandora a jar of evils, she is told not to open it. However, her curiosity overwhelms her. She opens the jar, and all sickness and evil plague mankind. Pandora’s seemingly innocent act serves as a warning to all women that their curiosity causes deadly consequences. Such a dramatic example kept women from questioning the patriarchal way of life.

AFTER:

(2) In “Metis and Athena”, women are clearly shown to be vulnerable and easily tricked to suit a man’s desire. Since Zeus wants to prevent his son’s birth, he “flattered [Metis] with honeyed conniving questions” (44). Ever eager to please her husband, Metis complied, and Zeus “immediately caught her in his hands and swallowed her” (44). Metis’s blind love for Zeus and his “honeyed” flattery causes her to submit to his every wish. Since Minoans regard Metis as the “wisest of all titans,” her ignorance and blind trust emphasize how easily men can manipulate mortal women.


NOTICE THIS ANALYISIS STILL TARGETS THE MI, YET IT IS MORE REVEALING AND ARTICULATE THAN THE ABOVE.


A helpful guide to a SMOOTH TRANSITION is the following format:

Possessive + Noun + Strong Verb

Pandora’s actions warn

Hera’s revenge reinforces



Reach for Significance

In Conclusion
Closing sentences should offer some insight beyond what you have already stated or proven. You want your paragraph or essay to end with a bang, not a fizzle.
Poor Closers:

In Greek Mythology, women are shown to be inferior to men.

Unfortunately, this is a stereotype that still exists today.

Better closers:

All of these female figures, which personify male chauvinism in the Greek myths, remain sad shadows of their former, powerful Minoans selves. Perhaps the Mycenaeans feared the Minoans and their advanced technology and peaceful way of life. By degrading the female power, a patriarchal society provided security in an unstable time. However, because women in these patriarchal tribes believed these messages about themselves, the belief that men make better leaders than women continued for thousands of years. Even today in 2015, the United States, despite being a powerful economic and military power, remains one of only a few superpowers that lack a female leader. In fact, the three most populated Muslim countries all elected women as leaders at some point in history. Perhaps the U.S., with its shorter history, still holds on the myths the Mycenaeans started generations ago.



Poor Closers:

Women are consistently shown to have curiosity, deceptive natures, and a beauty that is deceiving. Some of these beliefs still exist in images of women that are negative or stereotypical.




Better closers:

Unlike powerful modern propaganda that takes its form in television or radio, the Mycenaens found an entertaining way to disseminate their chauvinistic message. The myths were just one way these patriarchs could guarantee the stability of their domination over women. However, because women in these patriarchal tribes believed these messages about themselves, the belief that men surpass women in every way continued for thousands of years. Women allowed themselves to be voiceless, without the right to vote or even interact with others, for generations. Although women earned the right to vote in the United States in the 1920s, women still lack representation in American government. Other countries, like Iran, still struggle with giving women the power vote, walk unchaperoned, or even drive a car. The majority of men and women in this country consider these basic freedoms taboo. Such ancient practices in our modern world only prove that the Mycenaean power over women remains strong.

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