Thecb program Review Report; dhh, sped, VI program Review, 2015



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2015: THECB Program Review Report; DHH, SPED, VI

Program Review, 2015

Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH, Undergraduate)


Special Education (SPED; BSIS, M.Ed. Initial Certification and M.Ed. Diagnostician)
Visual Impairment (VI, M.Ed. in Special Education – Certification as Teacher of the Visually Impaired)
Program Review (Overview)

TABLE OF CONTENTS


  1. Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH, Undergraduate)

  2. Special Education (BSIS, M.Ed. Initial Certification, and M.Ed. Diagnostician)

  3. Visual Impairment (VI, M.Ed in Special Education -Certification as Teacher of the Visually Impaired)


I. Deaf and Hard-of Hearing (DHH) Self-Study Review (Undergraduate) 4-21

Introduction 04

Faculty Qualifications 04

Full-time/Part-time (F/P) Faculty 04

Additional Faculty 07

Faculty Publications 07

Faculty External Grants 08

Faculty Teaching Load 08

Faculty/Student Ration 08

Student Demographics 09

Student Time-to-Degree 10

Student Publication and Awards 12

Student Retention, Graduation, Enrollment Rates, and Degrees Conferred 12

Graduate Licensure Rates & Placement 14

Alignment of Program with Stated Program and Institutional Goals & Purposes 15

Program Curriculum and Duration in Comparison to Peer Programs 15

Program Facilities and Equipment 19

Program Finance and Resources 20

Program Administration 20

Conclusion 20


II. THECB Special Education … (BSIS; M.Ed. initial certification; M.Ed. Diagnostician) 22-78

Faculty Qualifications 22

Faculty Publications 25

Faculty External Grants 26

Faculty Teaching Load 27

Faculty/Student Ratio 28

Student Information by Program 28

Program and Accreditation Standard Alignment 36

Principal Undergraduate Assessment Findings Based on CEC Standards 37

BSIS 37


M.Ed. in Special Education with Initial Teacher Certification 55

M.Ed. in Special Education with Certification as an Educational Diagnostician 70

Program Finance and Resources 78

Program Administration 78

III. Visual Impairment 79-123

Faculty Qualifications 79

Faculty Publications 83

Faculty External Grants 84

Faculty Teaching Load 85

Faculty/Student Ratio 86

Student Demographics 86

Personnel Prep Advisory Group (PPAG) 86

M.Ed. in Special Education – Certification as Teacher of the Visually Impaired 90

Student Publications and Awards 91

Student Enrollment and Retention Rates 92

Student Graduation Rates 94

Graduate Licensure Rates 96

Graduate Placement 96

Number of Degrees Conferred Annually 97

Program and Accreditation Standard Alignment 98

Assessment of Student Learning and Alignment with CEC 102

Program Curriculum and Duration in Comparison to Peer Programs 122

Program Facilities and Equipment 122

Program Finance and Resource 122

Program Administration 89
Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) Self-Study Review

(Undergraduate)
Introduction

The following document serves as the program report for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) program in the James I. Perkins College Education at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFASU). The SFASU DHH program is a four-year, undergraduate educator preparation program (EPP), offering educator preparation for students desiring to teach deaf and hard of hearing students in grade PK – 12. The DHH degree offers students opportunity to obtain highly-qualified status with a Texas educator certification in Deaf and Hard of Hearing (PK – 12). This report spans a seven year period (2008 – 2015) and was compiled for review by The Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Faculty Qualifications
The DDH program employs three full-time faculty.  Additionally, adjunct faculty are utilized on a semester-by-semester basis according to program needs.  The following table lists the qualifications (including education, courses taught, certifications, and/or licensures) of the current full-time faculty and part-time faculty (2014 - 2015 academic year). Also following is a description of the current full-time and part-time faculty.
Full-Time/Part-Time (F/P) Faculty:
Scott Whitney, Ed.D. Scott Whitney, Associate Professor, has three years’ teaching experience in a Deaf Education classroom. He has also been teaching American Sign Language I and II since 1997, beginning his career in teaching sign language at Lamar State College. Scott Whitney also has 8 years of experience supervising student teachers and practicum students. He has been employed in the teacher preparation program (Deaf and hard of hearing) at Stephen F. Austin since 2002. His experience includes applying for and receiving NCATE accreditation, with the collaboration of other faculty.

J. Lindsey Kennon, M.Ed. Lindsey Kennon has been teaching in the field of Deaf Education for eleven years.  She has experience teaching in deaf education public school settings (five years) and at the university level (six years).  Her public school experience includes teaching all levels of students (PK - 12) in self-contained settings, itinerant settings, co-teach settings, and teaching elective ASL courses.  She has taught a diverse population of students with regard to hearing levels, communication modalities, use of amplification devices, literacy levels, grade levels, etc.  During her time as a classroom teacher, she served as a mentor to new deaf education teachers and also served as a mentor to university preservice student teachers.  Lindsey began her tenure at Stephen F. Austin in 2008, teaching adjunct courses in deaf education.  Hired full-time in 2010 at SFA, Lindsey has taught upper-level deaf education courses as well as American Sign Language.  She continues to work with student teachers and practicum students as a field supervisor.  She is currently a tenure-track instructor with coursework completed in an Educational Doctoral program with Sam Houston State University (Ed.D. Developmental Education Administration). At the time of this report, she has a current status in her doctoral work of “ABD”, with an anticipated completion of her doctoral degree in August 2015.
Shelia Dyer, M.A. Shelia Dyer has extensive experience interpreting for the Deaf Community. She has also been instrumental in setting up workshops at Stephen F. Austin for the benefit of existing ASL students. She has been teaching ASL courses and Deaf culture at Stephen F. Austin State University since 2000. Her connections with the Deaf Community, expertise in American Sign Language, and contributions to the language-learning of our students are critical to the success of the program.
Maggie Hilton, M.A. Maggie currently works as the Coordinator of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services and Senior Interpreter for the disability services office at Stephen F. Austin State University. Before her current position, she was employed by the same program from 2005-2009 as an American Sign Language Interpreter. Her skills as an interpreter and position as an interpreter coordinator give her valuable insight into the needs of a program which will train potential future interpreters. She has taught ASL I (SPH 172) as an adjunct faculty member since 2010.
Mandy Seybold, M.Ed. Mandy has served in the field of education for 13 years. She has experience in many roles: elementary classroom teacher, auditory impaired specialist, and adjunct faculty for Angelina Community College, University of Phoenix and Stephen F. Austin State University. She has also served as the Professional Development Trainer for Literacy for Coastal Region Adult Education and as the Professional Development Coordinator and ESL Assessment Trainer for Region V Adult Education.

Nancy Burleson, M.S. Nancy has 6.75 years of experience in teaching deaf and hard of hearing students in the Texas Regional Day School Program (RDSPD) for the Deaf system. She has taught grades K – 5 in self-contained and itinerant settings in various content areas. She has experience in writing Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s), attending Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings, and monitoring student progress. She served as deaf education team leader for one year during her teaching experience.



FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS

FACULTY

COURSES TAUGHT

ACADEMIC DEGREES & COURSEWORK

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS & COMMENTS

Scott Whitney, Ed.D. (F)



SPH 172 - ASL I

SPH 272


SPH 414

SPH 274


SED 442

SPH 470


SPH 471

DHH 442


Ed.D. Lamar University, Deaf Education/Deaf Studies
M.A. Illinois State University, Special Education
B.A. North Park College, Biology

Texas Certificates Held

- Deaf Education (EC – 12)


Passed the TASC-ASL Certification Exam

Lindsey Kennon, M.Ed. (F)



SPH 172

SPH 470


DHH 350

SPH 476


SPE 443

SPH 471


SPH 414

SPH 442


Ed.D. (Aug 2015) Sam Houston State University (ABD), Developmental Education Administration
M. Ed. (2008) Stephen F. Austin State University, Educational Leadership
B.S. (2004) Stephen F. Austin State University, Hearing Impairment

Texas Certificates Held

- Hearing Impaired (EC-12)

- American Sign Language

- Generalist (EC-4)

- Generalist (4 – 8)

- English (8 – 12)


Passed the All-Level Principal Exam (2008)

Shelia Dyer, M.A. (F)



SPH 172

SPH 476


SPH 479

SPH 478


SPH 483

SPH 414


M.A. Stephen F. Austin State University, Interdisciplinary Studies
B.A. East Central State University, Human Services Rehabilitation

Certificates Held

- BEI Level III American Sign Language Interpreting Certification

- DARS - Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Certificate Court Interpreter

Maggie Hilton, M.A.(P)



SPH 172

SPH 272


M.A. (2009) Stephen F. Austin State University, Public Administration
B.S. (2008) Stephen F. Austin State University, Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Magna Cum Laude)

Texas Certificates Held

- Deaf and Hard of Hearing

(PK – 12)
Other Certificates

- BEI III American Sign Language Interpreting Certification



Burleson, Nancy E. (P)

SPH 272

SPH 172


SPH 274

M.A. (2006) Lamar University, Deaf Education
B.A. (2004) Texas Woman’s University, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Texas Certificates Held

- Deaf and Hard of Hearing (PK – 12)

- English as a Second Language (EC – 12)

- Generalist (EC-4)


Other Certificates

- Texas BEI Certified Sign Language Interpreter



Seybold, Mandy (P)

SPH 172

M.Ed. (2007) Stephen F. Austin State University, Professional Reading Specialist
M. Ed. (2005) Stephen F. Austin State University, Educational Leadership
B.S. (2002) Stephen F. Austin State University, Hearing Impaired

Texas Certificates Held

- Hearing Impaired (EC – 12)

- Generalist (EC – 4)

- English (4 – 8)

- Master Reading (EC – 12)

- Principal (EC – 12)

- Reading Specialist (EC – 12)



Additional faculty. Although the faculty members currently employed in the program are fully qualified to teach in the proposed degree program, the quality and quantity of the coursework for this degree are demanding and would stretch the current faculty members thinly.  An addition of one, possibly two, new faculty positions are necessary in order to run a program of excellence and of the quality SFA demands.  These faculty members will be highly qualified to teach the required course load and will allow all members of the faculty to fully focus on student learning and success for the program.
Faculty Publications

A listing of SFASU DHH program faculty publications follows this report. Additional publications are projected for the 2014-2015 and 2015 – 2016 academic terms. Publication is a goal and requirement of all SFASU DHH program full-time faculty. Faculty are also frequently involved in presentations at the local, regional, state, and national levels.


Scott Whitney, Ed.D.


Peer Reviewed

Whitney, S. (2015). Intel App Challenge: Snapshot ASL Recorder and Handshape Recognizer. Competition results announced mid-April 2015. Retrieved March 9, 2015 from: http://faculty.sfasu.edu/whitneyscott/RealSenseAppChallenge/Submission/SnapShotASLDemo.mp4

Whitney, S. (2004). Mocap ASL for the Sciences. National Science Foundation RDE-DEI: award #HRD-0435679.

Whitney, S. (2007). Adventure Games as Teaching Tools for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Journal of Border Education Research. (In print, Journal discontinued before published).

Whitney, S. (2007). ASL for the Sciences: Needs, Resources, and Research. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from DeafEd.net Web site. Site has been revised. Original file: http://faculty.sfasu.edu/whitneyscott/StateWide/statewide06.ppt

Requested for Student Thesis

Whitney, S. (2007). Animal Signs 3D. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from Faculty Page - Scott Whitney Web site: http://www.faculty.sfasu.edu/whitneyscott/AnimalSigns/animalsigns3d.zip



Requested by Local Teachers

Whitney, S. (2007). TAKS Signs. Retrieved November 2, 2007, Faculty Page - Scott Whitney Web site: http://faculty.sfasu.edu/whitneyscott/TAKSSigns/TAKSSigns.htm



Self-Published

Whitney, S. (2012). Online Study tool. Retrieved October 10, 2013, from Faculty Page - Scott Whitney Web site: Migrating to new server

Whitney, S. (2005). Survey of Deaf Education Teacher Attrition in Texas. Retrieved November 2, 2007, from Faculty Page - Scott Whitney Web site: http://www.faculty.sfasu.edu/whitneyscott/DHHTeacherAttritionTX.htm

Whitney, S. (2007). Science Signs Quiz – 3D and QuickTime.



Faculty External Grants

SFASU’s DHH program has not been funded by any grants during the reporting period. There are plans to seek out existing grants as well as write new grants for the future. SFASU boasts outstanding resources for locating and writing grants, the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects. Utilizing the resources on campus will allow the DHH program to pursue external funding with greater fervor.


Faculty Teaching Load

All full-time faculty have a required teaching load of 24 teaching load credits (TLC’s) per academic year. Typically, this is allocated by 12 teaching hours per long semester (fall and spring), the equivalent of four, three-hour courses. There are occasions in which the TLC’s may be split differently between long semesters, depending upon the courses offered, student enrollment, and special circumstances. Part-time faculty, while not guaranteed teaching hours each semester, typically have a course load of three to six credit hours, depending upon the courses offered, student enrollment, and special circumstances. The following chart offers a summary of full-time faculty course loads during the reporting period.







SEMESTER

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Scott Whitney

SPRING

FALL

4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


Shelia Dyer

SPRING

FALL

5

5


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

6


5

4


Lindsey Kennon

SPRING

FALL

0

3 (Adj)


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4


4

4



Faculty/Student Ratio
American Sign Language (ASL) classes have been between 15 and 30 students. Within the past two years, we have moved to reduce class sizes in ASL classes to 15 students per section in order to allow better feedback on expressive performance. The senior level Deaf education pedagogy courses average 15 students while those courses available to deaf education and interpreting minors enroll an average of 25 students. The larger groups tend to be online courses in the program. This allows for positive student-instructor relationships to develop with each cohort. Even the largest classes (online and ASL) still offer the support of a low faculty-to-student ratio.
Student Demographics

Etnicity

Demographic data for the reporting period were requested by program faculty from various university offices. For the 2014-2015 Academic year, the DHH program student demographics are as follows:


Ethnicity

Demographic data for the reporting period were requested by program faculty from various university offices. For the 2014-2015 Academic year, the DHH program student demographics are as follows:






# of Newly Enrolled Students in each category

Percent of total newly enrolled students in program

2011

 

 

Black or African American

1

4.76%

Hispanic of any race

2

9.52%

Race and ethnicity unknown

1

4.76%

White

17

80.95%

2012

 

 

Asian

1

3.33%

Black or African American

3

10.00%

Hispanic of any race

6

20.00%

Race and ethnicity unknown

2

6.67%

White

18

60.00%

2013

 

 

American Indian or Alaskan

2

7.14%

Black or African American

3

10.71%

Hispanic of any race

4

14.29%

Race and ethnicity unknown

1

3.57%

White

18

64.29%

2014

 

 

Black or African American

3

7.69%

Hispanic of any race

7

17.95%

White

29

74.36%

Grand Total

118

100.00%


Geographical distribution of students:

BatchGeo was used (https://en.batchgeo.com) to create a visual map representing the regional areas from which our students permanently reside. In additional to enabling understanding of our student population demographics, this is useful data in terms of recruitment efforts. The map makes it clear from which areas our students typically reside, allowing for reinforcing recruitment in those areas. It also makes it clear from which areas recruitment efforts should be increased and targeted.


Using Webfocus to generate addresses of students enrolled in Human Services programs and data on high schools from which the students graduated, we generated a visual representation of the geographical origin of the students. Where data was provided, we used the home address, where it was not provided; we used the high school name and cross-referenced the name with the Texas School Directory generated by AskTED.

http://mansfield.tea.state.tx.us/TEA.AskTED.Web/Forms/SearchScreen.aspx?orgType=State

Of 131 students who started the program from 2010 to 2014, only 2 had no data from either source.


Data from students who began the program between 2010 and 2014 indicate a strong student pool permanently residing in the Dallas/Fort Worth area as well as the Houston area.

The map is located at https://batchgeo.com/map/3cd39b559a50c1900c95cbb4955af0fa


Student Time-to-Degree

The DHH program is a four-year, undergraduate degree. The degree is designed to be completed in a four-year time period. Typically, students adhere to this format. At times, transfer students will veer from the set plan due to factors such as date of entry in the program, when courses are offered, and what credit hours were able to transfer from their previous course work. Four (4) years of data were available in the WebFocus system which is available to faculty members. From the fall 2010 semester through the Spring 2013 semester, 7 students graduated. 6 of the students completed the degree within 2 years of “starting” and one completed the degree within 3 years. It is not yet clear if “start” means enrolling in the university or declaring their major as DHH, though it would seem logical that it would mean the time at which students declared their major. It is important to note that the program may have had more than 7 students graduate over the four years of data available, but the student began the program before 2010. The date they began the program is not available though WebFocus.



There are other factors that affect time-to-degree for our students, delaying or accelerating graduation. Dual credit high school programs are becoming more prevalent. Due to this, students entering the University might be able to begin major course work sooner. Admission to Teacher Education requires certain criteria to be met. At times, some students might experience difficulties meeting these requirements (GPA, cut scores on exams, clearing background checks), which delay graduation. The Perkins College of Education also has a policy that all students must pass their content certification exams (required by the Texas Education Agency for certification) prior to being allowed to student teach. Occasionally, a student might be delayed in student teaching as they attempt to pass exams required in the timeframe established. Below is a typical four-year plan for a student in the DHH program.


TIME-TO-DEGREE – TYPICAL FOUR-YEAR PLAN

Freshman Year

COURSE #

COURSE TITLE

COURSE #

COURSE TITLE

SPH 172

Beginning American Sign Language

SPH 272

American Sign Language II

Science

Many choices available

PSC 142

Intro to American Government: Structure

PSC 141

Intro to American Government: Theory

ENG 132

Comp & Rhetoric: Critical & Analytical

ENG 131

Composition: Rhetoric & Argument

MTH 127

Intro to Math for Elem. Teachers

Humanities

Many choices available

Science

Many Choices Available

HIS 133

U.S. History Survey, 1000-1877

HIS 134

U.S. History Survey, 1877 – Present    

Sophomore Year

Course #

Course Title

Course #

Course Title

SPH 477

American Sign Language III

SPH 479

American Sign Language IV

MTH 128

Intermediate Math for Elem. Teachers

MTH 129 or up

Many Choices Available

Specialization

For Highly Qualified Status

Specialization

For Highly Qualified Status

Soc/Beh Sci.

Many Choices Available

EPS 380

Educational Psychology

RDG 318

Early Literacy Development

SPH 274

Introduction to Deaf Education

Junior Year

SPH 470

Language for the Deaf

SPH 442

Seminar in Speech and Language Methods

SPH 478

Manual Communication Interpreting

SED 372

Reading & Info Literacy in Secondary Schools

Specialization

For Highly Qualified Status

Specialization

For Highly Qualified Status

SED 370

Intro to Pedagogy & Active Learning

SED 450

Facilitating a Learner-Centered Environment

RDG 320

Upper Level Literacy Department

SPH 350

Access to the Phonemic Code – DHH







SPH 476

Literacy Development for the Deaf

Senior Year

SPH 471

Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

SED 442

Student Teaching in a Secondary Learning Community

SPE 329

Survey of Exceptionalities







Specialization

For Highly Qualified Status

ELE 441

Student Teaching in the Elementary School

SPH 414

Deaf Culture

SED 443

Synthesis Seminar


Student Publication and Awards

During the Spring 2012 semester, DHH major Allyson Hall was awarded recognition as Outstanding Secondary Education Student Teacher among a pool of regular education, special education, and deaf education students. Allyson was applauded for her professionalism, teaching, and overall performance as a student educator. Another DHH major, Sarah Tinsley, was awarded the prestigious University Scholars Award scholarship through the School of Honors. This award considers all students across all colleges in the university. Sarah being the recipient speaks to the high quality of students the DHH program attracts. The DHH program students and faculty are proud of the student achievements and recognition.


These awards are not necessarily continuous. We encourage students to apply for awards as we learn of them. Periodically, our students are awarded these external awards. We have no awards tied specifically to the DHH program that are given on a regular basis.
Student Retention, Graduation, Enrollment Rates, and Degrees Conferred Annually

The following chart contains information regarding enrollment and degrees awarded from 2008 – 2015. There is a trend of steady growth over the seven year span. Recruitment events indicate an increased awareness and interest in the program. There also exists a steady need for educators in this field, a high-need area as identified by the Texas Education Agency.



YEAR

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

AVG

DEGREES AWARDED

15

15

9

9

12

 

 

10.2

ENROLLMENT

 70

 67

 76

90

105

93

106

 

From the WebFocus data available to faculty, we were able to partially determine retention data over the past four years. The data consists of the sre422_fr_retions_study_prod (address, id, name, demographic data, and enrollment status) with the sre350_grade_sheets_prod reports.


Of 131 students identified as DHH majors, 87 have not graduated and are not currently enrolled. This, however, does not accurately reflect attrition. 64 out of the 87 students not enrolled or attending never took a class in the DHH degree plan. It may be that the 64 students either did not attend the university after applying or they dropped out before the program had a chance to work with them to any significant degree.
23 students who selected DHH as their major did take at least one course in the DHH degree plan, but have now been identified as not attending or not enrolled. 46 students who selected DHH as their major either graduated or are still enrolled.
The data was calculated as follows:

46 students enrolled or graduated



23 students took at least one class. No longer enrolled, did not graduate (attrition).

69 students total


Attrition:

23/69 = 33%


Of the students who left the program, 5 students took only 2 courses, only one of those 5 took the first pedagogy course. In total, 7 students who took the first pedagogy course are no longer enrolled and have not graduated. The majority (14 out of 23) of students who took at least one DHH course left the program after the first one or two ASL courses. This may indicate that they were unsure of their major or that they had excessive difficulty acquiring American Sign Language. A survey would help us identify strategies to improve retention. A similar survey would help identify strategies to retain students who take the first pedagogy course in the DHH major and then withdraw from the university.
We would like t answer the following questions: Are students choosing their major accurately? The number of students who never took a DHH course may indicate errors in selecting a major. An unquantified number of conversations with students have indicated that many choose a DHH major when they actually intend to become interpreters. We need to find a means of assessing the frequency of students choosing the wrong major and then find ways to decrease such errors.


  • We have experienced at least 3 students who have temporarily withdrawn for personal reasons, then return to the program. We need to accurately assess the number of students who have done so.

It would be extremely useful to determine if the attrition represents a loss of students with high or low GPA. If we are losing students with a high GPA, we may want to take steps to prevent the loss of such students. If we are losing students with a low GPA, we may want to take steps to increase the success of students who are struggling.


Graduate Licensure Rates & Placement (i.e. Employment or Further Education/Training)

From the SBEC Educator Certification website:

Because the data for certificates awarded is aggregated under Special Education in the SBEC Educator Certification Online System as well as the TEA TPEIR reports, we will use the passing rates on certification tests. The data presented was downloaded from the SBEC Educator Certification Oline system using ASEP reports on certification test pass rates. 2013-2014 data is not available at this time. The report, therefore, includes 6 years’ worth of data.
For the TExES 181 exam, we have pass rates of 84.6 to 88.9 for 3 of the years of available data. For the remaining 3 years, pass rates exceeded 90%. For one year, we had a 100% pass rate.
Data source:

https://secure.sbec.state.tx.us/SBECONLINE/ASEP2/rpt_web_initial_pass_rate_menu.asp?sid=

Initial Pass Rates By Entity – one year’s data downloaded at a time, combined into a single spreadsheet.






Stephen F Austin State University DHH program

Statewide

Ac. Yr

Takers

Passers

Percent

Takers

Passers

Percent

2006-2007

13

13

100

54

50

96.50909091

2007-2008

9

8

88.9

55

49

81.1125

2008-2009

11

10

90.9

53

45

80.67

2009-2010

14

13

92.9

25

24

88.88888889

2010-2011

14

12

85.7

44

40

86.14

2011-2012

13

11

84.6

26

24

81.81818182

Grand Total







90.5

257

232

86.0779661

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program at Stephen F. Austin State University compares favorably to the statewide pass rates. With the exception of 2011, the SFASU passing rates have exceeded the Statewide averages (calculated with the SFA data removed).


Graduates of the DHH program have a high rate of employability upon graduation and certification. Typically, students in the program receive multiple job offers prior to graduation. It is common for Texas school districts to contact program faculty with openings throughout the year, especially in the early spring semesters.

Based on informal faculty observation, many SFASU DHH program graduates tend to pursue post-baccalaureate graduate degrees. Typically, these students are seeking Masters level degrees ranging from special education, diagnostician, reading specialists, deaf studies, and educational leadership. Recently, a former graduate contacted program faculty to request a letter of recommendation for a doctoral program. SFASU DHH program graduates tend to be the leaders in their districts and programs, a point for which the DHH faculty are proud.



Alignment of Program with Stated Program and Institutional Goals and Purposes
The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program at SFASU is closely aligned with the mission, goals and values of the Unit, the College of Education.  The mission of the College of Education is to prepare competent, successful, caring and enthusiastic professionals dedicated to responsible service, leadership, and continued professional and intellectual development. We share the mission and goals of the Unit.  Preparing competent special educators  
Further, the goals of the Unit are 1) to provide programs based upon sound pedagogical and clinical practice, 2) to prepare teachers, support personnel, and educational leaders for Texas, 3) to employ and support faculty members who are committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service, 4) to provide a variety of teaching venues incorporating the latest technologies to a range of diverse student interests, backgrounds, and aspirations, 5) to maintain resources and facilities that allow each program to meet its expected outcomes, 6) to collaborate with external partners to enhance students’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions, and to influence the ongoing exchange of ideas for mutual benefit, and 7) to conduct research to advance knowledge and to contribute to the common good.   Department and program faculty embrace these goals and strive to achieve them to the best of their ability with the resources available.
In the College of Education we value and are committed to the following values:  (1) academic excellence through critical, reflective, and creative thinking, (2) life-long learning, (3) collaboration and shared decision-making, (4) openness to new ideas, to culturally diverse people, and to innovation and change, (5) integrity, responsibility, diligence, and ethical behavior, and (6) service that enriches the community.
The “theme” of the Unit is “preparing professional educators who positively impact learning for all students.”  Deaf and Hard of Hearing teaching candidates value and demonstrate academic excellence, collaboration, openness, and integrity.  They are dedicated to service and committed to lifelong learning and professional development.
Program Curriculum and Duration in Comparison to Peer Programs

SFA Course

Baylor – B.A.

Lamar – M.S.

Texas Tech – M.S.

TWU M.S.

SPH 172

CSD 1405 ASL I

DSDE 2375

ASL 1301 - ASL I

COMS 4553 ASL I

SPH 272

1406 ASL II

DSDE 2376

ASL 1302 - ASL II

COMS 4613         ASL II

SPH 477

2301 ASL III

DSDE 3306

ASL 2301 - ASL III

COMS 4913 ASL III

SPH 479

2302 ASL IV

DSDE 4307

ASL 2302 - ASL IV

 

SPH 483

 

 

 

 

SPH478

 

DSDE 1378

ASL 3301 - ASL V

 

SPH 274

CSD 1360 Introduction to Deaf Education

DSDE 1377

EDSP 5350* Foundations DHH

COMS 5753 History and Trends

SPH 414

CSD 3312 Deaf Studies

DSDE 1374

ASL 3312 - Deaf Culture

COMS 2513         Deaf Culture

DHH 442

 

DSDE 5322 Modern Math & Science

EDSP 5307 Problems and Trends in Special Education

COMS 5403 Language through content

SPH 470

CSD 2318 Language Development

DSDE 5318 ASL/ENG Bilingual Ed. DHH

EDSP 5351* Emergent Lang & Lit. DHH

COMS 5823 Lit. Dev. - DHH

SPH 471

CSD 4660 Internship I EC-12 Part 1

PEDG 5383 Internship

EDSP 5093* Internship for DHH I

 

SPH 476

CSD 4360 Language and Reading DHH I

DSDE 5319 Bilingual Lit & Deaf

EDSP 5353* Advanced Language & Literacy DHH

COMS 5663 Strategies Language Dev.

DHH 350

CSD 4368 Introduction to Aural Rehab

DSDE 5313 Speech & Audio Deaf Education

EDSP 5352* Oral Communication for DHH Students

COMS 5683 Spoken lang. & listening

SED 370

TED 1312 Introduction to Teaching

PEDG 5350 The Learning Process

 

 

SED 372

TED 1112 Instructional Technology Lab

DSDE 5321 Instructional Design

 

 

SPE 443

CSD 4662 Internship II EC-12 Part 1

DSDE 5309 Advanced Practicum

EDSP 5093* Internship DHH II

Student Teaching

SED 450

CSD 4661 Internship I EC-12 Part 2

PEDG 5330 Effective Teaching

 

COMS 5513 Instructional Processes DHH

SPE 329

TED 2360 Teaching Special Education

DSDE 5328 Multi-disabled Deaf

EDSP 5389 DHH with additional disabilities

COMS 5303 Differentiated Instr. For addn’l disabilities

RDG 318

 

PEDG 5387 Reading in Elementary Sch.

 

 

HMS 203

 

PEDG 5340 Normal Human Growth & Dev

 

 

SED 443

 

PEDG 5345 Instructional Design

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5314 Adv. Deaf Studies

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5320 ASL/ENG Bilingual Assessment

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5326 Psych. of Deaf

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5329 Law and Deaf Ed.

 

 

 

 

PEDG 5375 Content Area Reading

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5310 Multicultural Deaf

 

 

 

 

DSDE 5311 ASL V

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

CSD 4301 Introduction to Audiology

 

AHSL 5344* Basics of Audiology

COMS 5013 Audiology for Deaf Education

 

 

 

AHSL 5345* Aural Habilitation

 

 

 

 

EDSP 5303 ABA I: Applied Behavior Analysis in Special Education

 

 




 

EDSP 5354* Accessing the General Education Curriculum for Students who are DHH

 

 

CSD 4663 Internship II EC-12 Part 2

 

 




 

CSD 4352 Diagnostic Methods

 

 

 COMS 5853 Teacher Friendly Assessment Strategies

 

CSD 4361 Language and Reading Instruction for the Deaf II

 

 




 

 

 

 

COMS 5123 Family-Centered Early Ed. DHH













COMS 4653         Literacy Dev. HI

 

 

 

 

COMS 5803 Parent-Professional Comm. Collab.

 

 

 

 

COMS 5903 Linguistics of Sign Communication

Of the undergraduate programs offered, Lamar University’s B.A. in American Sign Language and TCU’s B.S. in Habilitation of Deaf and Hard of Hearing are the most comparable to the DHH program at SFASU. Like our program, both of these university programs are Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s), allowing graduates the opportunity to obtain a Texas teaching certificate in Deaf and Hard of Hearing (EC – 12). Both programs, like SFASU, require practicum experiences in classrooms with deaf and hard of hearing students.

With regard to program curriculum, Lamar University’s B.A. in American Sign Language is the most comparable to SFASU’s DHH program with regard to philosophy, methodology, and course content. With a primary focus on language (preferably with the use of American Sign Language), SFASU’s program and Lamar’s program both offer rich coursework in American Sign Language and education courses specifically related to teaching deaf and hard of hearing students. TCU’s B.S. in Habilitation of Deaf and Hard of Hearing has a central focus that falls more in the area of clinical intervention with many courses in speech and language pathology as required coursework. TCU’s degree plan lists “Basic Sign” and “Intermediate Sign” in addition to ASL I and ASL II. This likely suggests there is less emphasis on American Sign Language in this program and more of an overview in ASL paired with an overview of other sign coding systems.

Requirements for number of hours in each of the three comparable programs (SFASU, Lamar, TCU) are very much aligned, which each program requiring between 120-124 hours of coursework. As mentioned, all programs offer certification in the area of Deaf and Hard of Hearing. A sampling of course syllabi were pulled for each program. It was found that the coursework offered for all undergraduate programs, is similar (with the exception of TCU’s program – which still offered comparable classes in deaf education, just not as many). Course assignments were also comparable, as were philosophies for SFASU and Lamar Deaf Education programs.


A small national comparison study was conducted to determine the degree to which SFASU’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing program compared. Utah State University (USU) has a comparable Deaf Education program, offering a B.S. in Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education. As with comparable undergraduate programs, USU offers similarity in coursework, number of required hours, course assignments, and even textbooks. Interestingly, USU’s program was the most comparable to SFASU’s with regard to philosophy and methodology, more so than the state comparative programming.
Overall, SFASU’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing program is doing well when compared to state and national programs. There are areas identified in which expansion could occur (how teachers obtain highly qualified status, offering additional certifications, offering more varied coursework). SFASU’s DHH program continues to offer a degree that is rare in the state and that continues to be fueled by a high need area in public education. The comparative study was worthwhile to bring validation to current practice and offer insight for future needs and improvement.

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