The warwick writing programme


ROUTE B:  LONG PROJECT for full time students



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ROUTE B:  LONG PROJECT for full time students


AUTUMN TERM

Full-time students following Route B will study (along with Research for Writing):



  • Warwick Fiction Workshop I AND/OR

  • Non Fiction Workshop OR

  • Writing for Children and Young People

SPRING TERM

Module choices for the second term need to be made by the end of September when a questionnaire is sent round. As numbers may be restricted on some modules, students will be asked to name their second and third choices.



  • Long Project: 1:1 tutorials begin

Plus one of the following:

Crossing Borders

The Practice of Literary Translation


  • Warwick Fiction Workshop II

  • Seven Basic Plots

  • Writing Poetry

  • Writing about Human Rights and Injustice

  • Ecopoetics

  • or Another module as mentioned on page 6.

  

SUMMER TERM

Long Project: continuation of work under supervision

 

PART-TIME STUDENTS



THE COURSE STRUCTURE
There are two pathways through the Warwick MA in Writing: 

Route A involves five taught modules, including Research for Writing plus four other modules, in which a wide range of written work is produced.  Part-time students who choose Route A generally take two modules in the first term of their first year (of which one must be Research for Writing). They go on to take one module in the second term of their first year, one module in the first term of their second year, and one module in the second term of their second year. For further information please consult the guidelines in the information pack that we send to you over the summer.

Route B - the 'Long Project' route - involves three taught modules, including Research for Writing plus two modules (one in the Autumn and one in the Spring) plus a long written project in any genre which the Programme is able to supervise.  Permission to follow the 'Long Project' route depends on an assessment of the student's prior experience of writing and of a proposal submitted at the beginning of September, just before part-time students enter their first year of study as well as on the availability of a qualified supervisor or supervisors.

During the first term of the second year, part-time students doing the Long Project will meet informally with tutors, usually in a group, to discuss their projects in the round: formal 1:1 supervision of the Long Project begins in Term 2 of the second part-time year and continues through Term 3. 

For Part-time Students on either route:


  • Participation in workshops and other events especially LitBiz, as well as informal group discussions to discuss their Long Projects in the round, is expected and encouraged. These will take place throughout the year and students should factor attendance for these in their travel plans.



ROUTE A for part-time students:

 In the first term of their first year, part-time students following Route A will study ONE of the following (along with Research for Writing):



  • Warwick Fiction Workshop I

  • Non Fiction Workshop

  • Writing for Children and Young People (optional)

In the first term of their second year, part-time students following Route A will generally choose a second module from the same list. There is, however, room for flexibility. The Convenor of the MA in Writing will be happy to advise.

Please note that students will have to take either Fiction Workshop I or Non Fiction Workshop in their first OR second year. Ideally, students would take Fiction or Non Fiction workshop in their first year.

In the second term of their first year, part-time students following Route A will study ONE of the following:

Crossing Borders

Seven Basic Plots

The Practice of Literary Translation


  • Warwick Fiction Workshop II

  • Writing Poetry

  • Writing about Human Rights and Injustice

  • Ecopoetics

  • or Another module as mentioned on page 6.

SUMMER TERM
Continuation of written projects under supervision

Participation in workshops and other events

In the second term of their second year, part-time students following Route A will generally choose a second module from the same list. There is, however, room for flexibility as well as the possibility that some modules may change from year to year.

ROUTE B:  LONG PROJECT for part-time students


Part-time students following Route B take two taught modules in the autumn term of their first year and a third module in the spring of their first year, while developing their work on the Long Project throughout their time at Warwick.  The second year of the part-time course is given to ‘writing up’, supported by additional workshops and 1:1 tutorials in terms 2 and 3. The course is structured so as to reinforce students' existing strengths in creative work in the first term and to give them a wide range of choice in the second, while enabling them to focus on a long piece of writing.  Permission to follow the 'Long Project' route depends on an assessment of the student's prior experience of writing as well as the availability of a qualified supervisor or supervisors. We can offer supervision in Fiction (for adults or children), Non-fiction, and Poetry.  

AUTUMN TERM

In the first term of their first year, part-time students following Route B will study ONE of the following (along with Research for Writing):



  • Warwick Fiction Workshop I OR

  • Non Fiction Workshop

SPRING TERM

Module choices for the second term need to be made by the end of September. As numbers may be restricted on some modules, students will be asked to name their second and third choices.



  • Long Project: 1:1 tutorials begin

Part-time students doing the Long Project must take one of the following modules during the spring term of their first year:

Crossing Borders

Seven Basic Plots

The Practice of Literary Translation



  • Warwick Fiction Workshop II

  • Writing Poetry

  • Writing about Human Rights and Injustice

  • Ecopoetics

  • or Another module as mentioned on page 6.

SUMMER TERM

Long Project: continuation of work under supervision

Core Module – Research for Writing (convened by Dr Rochelle Sibley) Weeks 5-9 in Term 1:
This module for MA in Writing students focuses on how research and creative writing stand side by side, whether you’re writing fiction, poetry or non-fiction. It gives practical guidance on:

  • academic literature searches

  • checking your sources

  • identifying electronic sources for writers

  • researching future publication opportunities

  • research facilities available after leaving the university

The module uses collaborative workshops to create open discussions about the role of research in creative writing and will give opportunities to experience it first-hand. These sessions will also offer practical support for the MAW programme, such as how to write the reflective pieces for MA assessment. The Writing Centre aims to encourage students to locate, incorporate and respond to different forms of sources, both textual and otherwise, in their writing, and to explore different methods of communicating that research.


Sessions will be run as workshops and be conducted by Warwick Writing Programme staff and by the English subject librarian, Kate Williams as follows:
Session 1 (Week 5): Research in creative writing (2 hours)

This session covers the uses and function of research in creative writing, as well as outlining the formative assignment, and will be co-taught with members of the Creative Writing team.


Session 2 (Week 6): Writing reflective assignments (2 hours)

This session focuses on the reflective elements of many of the MA in Writing modules, and will be co-taught with a member of the Creative Writing team.


Session 3 (Week 7): Communicating research (2 hours)

This session discusses the different ways in which research can be communicated creatively, thinking about different media and the aims of the piece of writing itself.


Session 4 (Week 8): Identifying research sources for writers (1.5 hours)

This Library-based session will explore electronic research sources available to students during and after their degree. This session will be led by the English subject librarian, Kate Williams.


Session 5 (Week 9): Researching future publication opportunities (1.5 hours)

This Library-based session will discuss how to research future publication opportunities, allowing students to identify suitable outlets for their writing. This session will be led by the English subject librarian, Kate Williams, with assistance from members of the Creative Writing team.


Formative assignment
The Research for Writing provision requires students to complete a 1,000 word formative referencing assignment. This assignment can be EITHER a 1000-word formative reflective assignment on the texts that have most influenced the student OR a 1000-word critical review of a fictional text. Both versions of this assignment will be assessed according to the accurate use of MLA or MHRA referencing.

This assignment must be submitted to the Writing Programme Secretary by 12 noon on Monday, Week 10 (1 December). The exercise is marked as Pass/Fail. If you receive a Fail, you will receive appropriate feedback and will be required to resubmit. The award of an MA is contingent upon successful completion of the assessment for this module.

Long Project

Tutors: Sarah Moss, Leila Rasheed, Ian Sansom, Jonathan Skinner


The aim of this module is to provide a supervised space within which students with a strong prior record of achievement in writing* can pursue a long imaginative project: for example, a number or a collection of stories or poems, or a biography or other form of creative non-fiction. The module will provide training in and practical investigation of issues involved in the specific genre and will be supervised by established practitioner/practitioners in that genre.
Students can apply to do Long Projects in fiction, non-fiction or poetry. Though we assume that most students will be writing for adults, we can also support writing for children in all three forms.
*Students wishing to do Long Projects must submit short proposals by 1st September. (NB: Part-time students must submit their proposals by 1st September in their year of entry, even though they will not embark on their long projects until their second year of study.)
Towards the end of Term 1 we shall hold an informal meeting to introduce full time Long Project students to their tutors. Part-time Long Project students will be introduced to their tutors in term one of their second year at the latest and their one to one supervision will begin at the start of term two in their second year. ALL students will make scheduled appointments for their Long Project supervision with their tutors and are expected to keep them as they form part of their monitoring points.
One-to-one supervision will begin in Term 2 and continue until the end of Term 3.
Tutors will design reading lists to suit each individual student.
Assessment
18 000 words of creative work, which can be in any of the forms supported by the Warwick Writing Programme. (NB The creative submission can be a finished piece of work or an excerpt of a longer work.) PLUS a 2000-word commentary on aims, processes, and responses to reading.
Please see the Important Dates page for date of submission under “All remaining portfolios and/or Long Projects by 12.00 pm.”

MAW Workshops
All writing modules use workshops to some extent, and the two fiction modules are almost entirely workshop-based. How a given module is taught will be outlined in the first session. What follow are some preparatory notes intended for anyone who hasn’t previously attended writing workshops.

A workshop is a forum in which members of the group, under the guidance of the module leader, analyse and respond to examples of each other’s work, whether circulated in advance or written during that particular session. The workshop gives feedback to each individual, while advancing everyone’s critical skills. It should also help to develop professional attitudes, whether in terms of self-critical awareness or of a capacity to handle criticism from others. Module leaders emphasise the importance of a combination of a candid, exacting response to work being discussed, with tact and constructiveness. Certain personal boundaries are also set. In particular, it’s expected that people’s writing will respect the privacy of other members of the group.

Support for students within workshops

We recognise that some writing assignments, and most especially those drawing on personal experience, may open up areas of difficulty for students. Tutors are very sensitive to these needs, and they can always adjust assignments, give advice, or offer appropriate support. Any student encountering difficulties of this nature should contact his/her tutor promptly. Any help offered will be in complete confidence.



Auditing Workshops
If a workshop leader agrees in advance, and if numbers permit, it may be possible for a student to sit in on a workshop to which she/he is not assigned and to participate in the work as agreed by the workshop leader. The student must therefore have the time not just to attend the workshop, but to do any preparatory reading and writing and any work set during the workshop.

Warwick Thursdays (formerly LitBiz)

Staff of the Programme have excellent links not only with other writers but also with publishing houses, literary journals and agencies, with national and regional organizations such as the Arts Council, PEN and the Royal Literary Fund, and with other creative writing schools in Britain, continental Europe and the USA. An exchange programme enables MA students undertaking long projects to work in Milan under the supervision of Tim Parks. Please see page 8 for more information. A regular series under the title Warwick Thursdays (WT) brings literary professionals – among them, publishers and agents - to the Writers’ Room, where they meet students informally before giving a talk chaired by one of the MA students. This takes place every Thursday of each term from 1:30 until about 2:30 (or sometimes a little longer!) It’s a ‘free to all’ event but also an amazing opportunity to meet up with, brainstorm with, chat/catch up with and generally just network with your fellow students as well as the fantastic people who come and talk to us about our profession! You are required to attend at least one WT event in each of terms 1 and 2 (please see page 18 of the Monitoring Policy). There’ll be a sign in sheet for you. In Term 2 you and your fellow students will be coordinating WT events as part of your experience and in developing your skill set.



Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies

Monitoring Student Progression


Monitoring attendance and engagement is required to establish student progression on a course and, for international students, Tier 4 Visa compliance requirements. The University of Warwick requires all courses and students to be monitored on a termly basis.
As a student, you are responsible for managing your own learning by attending seminars, lectures (where applicable), scheduled workshops, supervisory sessions, by doing the necessary reading and preparation for classes and by completing assessment tasks on time. The department and its tutors undertake to design and deliver high quality degrees and modules using appropriate learning and assessment resources and to support you through your learning process so that you can achieve your full academic potential.
To help us gauge how successfully you are engaging with your degree and identify any problems you may be experiencing and offer support to help you, the department has a number of check points throughout the year. We are required by the University of Warwick to have these checkpoints. If you miss any of the points, this might indicate to us that you are having problems with the degree and need additional support. These check points (or monitoring points) are set out in the university’s Monitoring Student Attendance and Progression Policy which can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/intranet/postgrad. (See the right-hand side of the page.)
A summary of the monitoring points is provided below.

The members of staff responsible for the drafting of reports are:

  • Director of Graduate Studies: Dr Christina Britzolakis

  • Administrator: Ms Julia Gretton

All Post-graduate Taught and Research students in the English department will be subject to monitoring structures. The structure detailed below applies to the MA in Writing.


Term 1 Autumn (adapted for MAW students)

Point 1

Point 2

Point 3

Point 4

Point 5

Point 6

Submission of provisional module choices to WWP Secretary by 3 September.

Attendance at all Research for Writing seminars run by Library & Writing Centre staff compulsory for all MAW students.

Attendance at all seminars for EN modules in Weeks 1 to 10 inclusive.

Submission of assessment for Research for Writing by week 6.

Electronically registered modules on EMR system by the end of Week 3.

Attendance at a minimum of one Warwick Thursday event during the term.


Con’t

Term 2 Spring

Point 1

Point 2

Point 3

Point 4

Point 5

Attendance at weekly seminars for EN modules in Weeks 1 to 5 inclusive.

Submission of essays/portfolios from Autumn term modules.

Attendance at a minimum of one Warwick Thursday event during the term.

Attendance at seminars in weeks 6 to 10 inclusive.

MAW students to come into the WWP office personally and hand in a ‘Declaration of Engagement’ form at any point in the term but must be done by week 10.


Term 3 Summer Summer Break

Point 1

Point 2

Submission of second Term 1 essay/portfolio by Monday of week 5 to Graduate Secretary (if an English module) OR WWP Secretary (if WWP module)

Submission of first Term 2 essay/portfolio by Monday of week 10 to Graduate Secretary (if an English module) OR WWP Secretary (if WWP module)



Point 1

Point 2

Submission of all remaining essays/portfolios and Long Project by 1st September.

Response to email from WWP Secretary advising whether or not any periods of absence, vacation or unavailability over the Summer Break are planned.

It is extremely important that you meet the requirements of each point as failure to do so could result in a letter being sent to you from Student Records reminding you of your obligations as a student. Please speak to your Personal Tutor if you feel you might be at risk of not meeting these critical requirements at any point during your University career.

With regard to meetings with your Personal Tutor, please ensure that you take along to the meeting any written feedback which you have received on both your non-assessed and your assessed work. This could be a useful starting point for your discussion with your Personal Tutor.

Remember that your Personal Tutor is there to advise and support you in your academic career at Warwick. See page 20 for more information on the Role of the Personal Tutor.



Student Support

Personal Tutors

Every student is assigned to a personal tutor. The personal tutor is a member of academic staff in the department who can offer advice on academic matters and also help direct students in difficulty to appropriate support within the University. It is highly recommended that you make time to meet your Personal Tutor soon after you arrive, and regularly thereafter. A notice about Personal Tutor arrangements for MA students will be posted on the graduate notice board during the second week of term.


University Senior Tutor

For more information on the role of the Personal Tutor or what you can do if you need to take an issue further to the Senior Tutor, please visit this page: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors


PG-SSLC

The task of the Staff-Student Liaison Committee is to review regularly all aspects of postgraduate study in the Department. It is made of representatives of postgraduate students (from all MAs and PhD) as well as academic staff with a role in running postgraduate programmes. Via the SSLC, students can voice concerns and together with staff can work on solutions. The SSLC is also a forum where staff can communicate changes to the courses and proposed improvements. The SSLC is an extremely effective body and its work is very valued by both teaching staff and students. Student members are elected by their peers at the beginning of the year.


PG Hub

The PG Hub is a space for Warwick postgraduate taught and research students to access support and to work and share experiences together in the broadest context of postgraduate life, not just study.


Use the following link to find out more:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/pghub
Learning Grid

The Learning Grid aims to provide students at the University with a facility that actively supports the development of study, transferable and professional skills. For further information please see the following link:


http://www.2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/grid/
Student’s Union

For more information on the Student Union, what it does, events, notices, etc, please visit this page: http://www.warwicksu.com/ The Student’s Union is located on central campus across from the Arts Centre next to Costcutter.


Harassment

The University considers sexual and racial harassment to be unacceptable and offers support to students subjected to it. The University is also able to take disciplinary action against offenders. Help is available from the Senior Tutor, the staff at Counselling Services and Student Union Welfare Staff. The University’s harassment policy can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/insite/topic/healthsafety/welfare/harassment/


Disability

Students who wish to find out more about University support for people with a disability should contact the Disability Office. Disability Officers can offer a wide range of support for all types of disability. If you are a wheelchair user, it is very important that you make yourself known to the Disability Office soon after arrival, so that a personalised evacuation plan can be drawn up for you. Please see the Campus Contacts information on page 34 for Disability Office contact details.


Health

There is an NHS doctor’s surgery on campus. You must register with the surgery when you arrive. For any emergencies, ring University Security (999).


Health and Safety

The University monitors health and safety through its Health and Safety policy. This is posted on the noticeboard outside Reception in H506. If you have any questions regarding this matter, or have any specific causes of concern, you should speak to the Department’s nominated Health and Safety officer, Mrs Julia Gretton (j.gretton@warwick.ac.uk or 02476 523667).


More information about the arrangements for Health, Safety and Well-being across the University can be obtained from the Health, Safety and Well-being website http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/healthsafetywellbeing.
Fire Evacuation

In the case of a fire alarm in Millburn House, you are expected to leave the building via the nearest exit quickly and quietly. The congregation area of Millburn House is located on the north side of the building near Millburn Hill Road. Failure to evacuate the building during any fire alarm may lead to disciplinary action.


If you have a disability that may impede your evacuation you can request the Department’s Health and Safety Officer prepares a personalised evacuation plan for you. Further information on Fire Safety can be found at:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/healthsafetywellbeing/guidance/fire
In case of a fire alarm in the Humanities building, you are expected to leave the building via the nearest staircase quickly and quietly. The congregation area for the Department Offices in the Humanities Building is Car Park 8/8A, the multi-storey car park next to the Sports Centre.
First Aid

The first aiders in Millburn House are Julia Brown (Room F.51 upstairs from G06) ext 23005 and Tracey McVey (Room A0.13 in the Annex) ext 23511.


If you cannot find any of the fire officers or the first aider, you should contact Security on ext. 22083.
Complaints

A student may raise a complaint about any aspect of the teaching and learning process and the provision made by the University to support that process, unless the matter can be dealt with under the Disciplinary regulations, the Harassment Guidelines or the appeals mechanism. Students may not use the complaints procedure to challenge the academic judgement of examiners. Full details of the Student Academic Complaints Procedure can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/complaintsandfeedback/



The Library

The Library will be a very useful resource for you during your time here at Warwick. You should familiarise yourself with their services at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library as soon as possible in order to make the most of their services. They can be contacted on 024 76522026.


The Academic Registrar’s Office and The International Office

The Academic Registrar's Office is headed by the Academic Registrar, Dr Mike Glover. Its principal function is to coordinate all aspects of student administration and support and academic resource allocation. Further information can be found on: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/aro/about

QAA and Teaching Quality Information can be found at: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/aro/dar/quality/
Warwick is a globally connected university. Through collaborative partnerships we share resources and knowledge with academic communities throughout the world. One-third of our students are from overseas and we are the university of choice for over 45 international governments and sponsoring bodies. We have a truly cosmopolitan campus where every student is considered 'international'; this means that through inter-cultural learning and experiences we equip our graduates to become successful citizens on a global stage. For further information please visit: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/international
Nursery Services

If you require a place for your under-four-year-old child please visit



http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/childrensservices/nursery.
The Academic Office

For information on student records, awards and ceremonies, student finance and funding and the Graduate School, please visit: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice


PORTFOLIOS: Approval / Submission of written work
Ideas for and titles of essays must be discussed with relevant tutors or supervisors. In the case of ‘academic’ modules, work whose title has not been agreed with the module tutor will not be accepted.
Deadlines for assessed work are centrally timetabled and there are penalties for late submission (3 marks per day). Students are expected to plan their work in advance, on the basis of the deadlines. Extensions on medical grounds, or for other reasons beyond the student’s control, must be requested in advance from the Convenor of the MA in Writing, Sarah Moss (term 1) and Ian Sansom (terms 2 and 3). Supporting evidence (such as a doctor’s certificate) is always required.
If the number of documents ‘allowed’ for submission on-line is less than the number you wish to submit, add one of your documents on to the end of another in Word on your computer until you have reduced the number of documents being submitted to that allowed by the on-line submission process.
The critical essay as part of a portfolio

Most MAW modules require a critical essay together with a portfolio of original work. While the portfolio generally counts for the larger part of the overall mark, and the essay for less, both parts of the submission are important. The following points are intended as a guide to tackling the essay.



 

  • Always check the number of words you are expected to write. Do not exceed or fall short of this figure by more than 10%, as penalties will apply.




  • Give careful thought to both the critical and the reflective aspects of your essay. These two adjectives invite you not only to reflect on the aims of your writing submission and the processes (e.g. drafting) by which it arrived at its final form, but to give critical attention to your own writing - for example by outlining affinities you may feel it has with the work of other writers, by showing how the practices and experience described by writers in essays, interviews, etc. affected your own thinking and practice, by placing your work in any intellectual, aesthetic, social or other context you feel it should be seen in, and so on. Be careful not to use the essay simply as an explanation or excuse for what you may not have managed to achieve in the rest of the portfolio. The original work should be able to stand on its own and the essay should represent ‘added value’, in intellectual terms.




  • Scholarly presentation is important. If the argument you are making has involved research, be meticulous in how you present the sources you have consulted. Whenever you cite works that have influenced you, or an author’s or critic’s views, provide a note giving the source of your quotation. You should also add a bibliography of the publications you have drawn upon in writing your essay.




  • Professional presentation is important, too. Submissions that are single-spaced are harder to read: please use one-and-a-half or double spacing. Use a sensible font such as Times New Roman, and don’t set poems in florid ‘handwritten’ fonts. Use white A4 paper.

Con’t


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