The process analogy essay



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ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PRE-WRITING

THE PROCESS

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • First, choose a subject that concerns you:
    • Some issue in your career field,
    • from personal experience,
    • or of national concern
      • politics, war, economy, history, education
    • This will be your “Subject X”

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • Then determine what point you want to make about it:
    • What is the purpose of my analogy?
    • What do I want/have to say about my subject (Subject X)?
    • What is my argument?
      • Abolishing the Patriot Act
      • Condemning the Iraq War
      • Preventing Teen Smoking
  • For Subject X
  • Against Subject X
  • To get the reader to understand Subject X as I do

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • Then list the most significant traits about Subject X:
    • Negative traits if you’re against it
    • Positive traits if you’re for it
      • that which makes it bad or good
    • those traits that illustrate your overall point
      • Invasion of privacy
      • Invasion of a sovereign state
      • Invasion of a foreign substance
    • If we were to stop here = Example Essay

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • At this point, you want to find a “Subject Y”
    • Another subject that shares those traits
    • A subject that will help you make the overall point against/for Subject X
    • *Look for this subject outside the class or category to which Subject X belongs
      • To use items from the same class = Comparison Essay

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • At this point, you want to find a “Subject Y”
    • What other act or belief shares these (positive/negative) traits?
    • What else “is like” Subject X?

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • PROCESS:
  • At this point, you want to find a “Subject Y”
    • Keep an eye on your Purpose:
      • What is the significance of the link between these 2 subjects?
      • Why are you bothering to discuss the resemblances between these 2 subjects?

SUBJECT Y

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • SUBJECT Y:
  • Already known
    • Is easily recognizable by most people
    • Has a consensus formed about it
      • (most agree)
    • Has had some decision/action made on it
      • (law, ban)
  • Outside the class or category to which Subject X belongs
      • To use items from the same class = Comparison

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • SUBJECT Y:
  • Shares at least 4+ resemblances with Subject X
    • Certainly, Subjects X&Y should have more similarities than differences

EXAMPLES

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • EXAMPLE
  • Suppose your Subject X were some frustrating situation
  • And the argument behind the analogy (your purpose, thesis, claim) were to argue against it
  • You would then list this frustrating situation’s negative traits
    • Why is it frustrating?
    • Why should it be stopped?
  • Then find another activity just as negative or frustrating:
      • NOT: the Iraq War is like the Vietnam War
      • BUT: the Iraq War is like a bad vacation

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • EXAMPLE
  • Subject X:
    • fast food
  • Argument:
    • against it
    • should be reduced
    • too much

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • EXAMPLE
  • List of (-) traits:
    • fast, rushed, poor quality, empty calories, bad effect on the body, body outside (pimples, fat), body inside (cholesterol, fat),
    • made in unsanitary conditions, made by people who don’t care about their work (in it for the paycheck, don’t care about customers)
    • in large doses (overindulgence) = dangerous
    • serves a basic human need, serves it quickly, serves it relatively cheaply/inexpensively, but at a higher cost down the road (long-term effects)

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • EXAMPLE
  • Possible Subjects Y:
    • Internet, porn, prostitution, poison
  • Title:
    • Fast Food Is like Prostitution
  • Analogy Statement:
    • Fast food is like prostitution in terms of its effects on the body, its initial price, and its long-term costs.

PITFALLS

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Avoid it:
    • If you are having difficulty finding more than one resemblance
    • If you can get only a solid paragraph out of it
    • If it would appear on a tee shirt, a bumper sticker, a poster, or a coffee mug, avoid it.

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • We have two basic types of analogies:
    • Descriptive and Explanatory
  • When it comes to choosing “appropriate” topics for this Analogy Essay, avoid descriptive analogies.
  • While both make connections between unrelated subjects, only one of these analogy types has any profundity, insightfulness, depth, or complexity to it.
  • DESCRIPTIVE vs. EXPLANATORY
  • Avoid CLICHES

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Descriptive analogies
    • are more like clichés
    • are cute, one-liners that may appear on tee shirts, bumper stickers, or coffee mugs
    • have no depth to them
    • Life may be like a box of chocolates, BUT you will only get a one-paragraph explanation out of that clever line.
  • Explanatory analogies
    • conversely, are deep, thought-provoking, multi-faceted ideas, connections, correspondences, associations
    • that can easily be explored in a lengthy essay.
  • DESCRIPTIVE vs. EXPLANATORY

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Avoid writing a Comparison-Contrast essay instead of an Analogy essay.
  • While both look for similarities, remember that significant differences exist between these two distinct Rhetorical Strategies:
  • COMPARISON-CONTRAST vs. ANALOGY

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Comparison-Contrast
    • compares subjects that are in the same class or category (they’re related) and
    • balances the discussion on differences and similarities.
  • Analogy
    • on the other hand, compares subjects across class boundaries (they’re unrelated) and
    • disproportionately discusses the resemblances more than the differences.
    • Further, Analogies are more metaphorical, connecting subjects previously unconnected, to transfer the feelings or opinions of one subject to another OR to get readers to think differently, to see one subject anew or afresh.
  • COMPARISON-CONTRAST vs. ANALOGY

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • To Illustrate
    • A Comparison Essay would discuss the similarities between the 1929 Stock Market Crash and the current market trouble.
    • However, an Analogy Essay could compare the current market trouble and its bailout to rewarding a spoiled child for his/her tantrums or other poor, selfish behavior.
  • COMPARISON-CONTRAST vs. ANALOGY

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Avoid writing an Example/Illustration essay instead of an Analogy essay.
  • While both argue for or against Subject X, remember that significant differences exist between these two distinct Rhetorical Strategies:
  • EXAMPLE/ILLUSTRATION vs. ANALOGY

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • What to Avoid:
  • Illustration
    • merely lists reasons for/against Subject X
    • makes no mention of Subject Y or its shared resemblances to Subject X
  • Analogy
    • argues for/against Subject X, too
    • BUT argues by comparing, relating, connecting
    • discusses the resemblances between subjects X&Y as a means of arguing for/against Subject X
  • EXAMPLE/ILLUSTRATION vs. ANALOGY

POSSIBLE TOPICS

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • POSSIBLE SUBJECT X:
  • Writing essays
  • Writing analogies
  • The way my mind works
  • Learning to work at a new job
  • Paying college athletes
  • Using steroids to increase athletic performance
  • Learning
  • Reading/critical thinking
  • Being in love
  • Learning to eat with chopsticks
  • Being dumped or cheated on
  • Studying

ANALOGY ESSAY

  • POSSIBLE SUBJECT X:
  • Using spanking to discipline children
  • God, (religion)
  • Heaven
  • Eating at fast food restaurants
  • Being a nurse
  • Writing essays
  • Abusing drugs or alcohol
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Gambling


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