Table of Contents statement of purpose 3



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Philosophy and Goals
The New Jersey world languages standard and indicators reflect the philosophy and goals found in the national Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (National Standards in Foreign Language Education Project, 2006). They were developed by consulting standards in the United States and internationally, as well as by examining the latest research and best practices on second-language acquisition. The revised world languages standard is generic in nature, designed as a core subject, and is meant to be inclusive for all languages taught in New Jersey schools. With regard to the implementation of the world languages standard for particular languages or language groups:


  • American Sign Language (ASL): Students and teachers of American Sign Language (ASL) communicate thoughts and ideas through three-dimensional visual communication. They engage in all three modes of communication—interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational—by using combinations of hand-shapes, palm orientations, and movements of the hands, arms, and body. ASL differs from other spoken languages in that the vocal cords are not used for communication.

  • Classical languages: The study of classical languages focuses primarily on the interpretive mode using historical contexts. Occasionally, some attention may be given to oral dimensions of classical languages, such as by asking students to make presentations in the language of study as a way of strengthening their language knowledge and use.

  • Heritage-languages: Heritage-language students may be (1) newly-arrived immigrants to the United States, (2) first-generation students whose home language is not English and who have been schooled primarily in the United States, or (3) second- or third- generation students who have learned some aspects of a heritage language at home. These students have varying abilities and proficiencies in their respective heritage languages; they often carry on fluent and idiomatic conversations (interpersonal mode), but require instruction that allows them to develop strengths in reading (interpretive mode) and in formal speaking and writing (presentational mode). These students are held to the same standards for world languages as their English-speaking peers, and they should be provided with opportunities for developing skills in their native languages that are both developmentally supportive and rigorous. Designing curriculum to maintain and further develop native-language skills ensures that the skills of these students do not erode over time as English becomes their dominant language.


Revised Standard
The world languages standard lays the foundation for creating local curricula and related assessments. Changes that led to the revised 2009 standard are as follows:


  • The communication and culture standards have been combined into one standard that continues to be organized by proficiency levels, but now also encompasses a broader spectrum of proficiency levels.

  • World languages content is both linguistic and cultural, and includes personal and social topics and concepts as well as ideas from other content areas. Both linguistic and cultural content statements have been added for each strand to provide a context for the cumulative progress indicators (CPIs) at each proficiency level.

  • Linguistic content varies and is dependent on the mode of language use. Proficiency does not occur at the same rate for all students in all skill areas. (See the results of the Foreign Language Assistance Program Grant Project, which are contained in the report, Policy, Assessment, and Professional Development: Results from a Statewide Study.) For example, a student may perform at the Novice-High level in reading and the Intermediate-Low level in speaking.

  • Cultural content recurs across the modes of communication because communication always occurs within a cultural context. The 21st-century themes identified in the Partnership for 21st Century Skills Framework are incorporated in many of these content statements. Students spiral through this content with increasing depth and sophistication as they attain higher levels of language proficiency. Therefore, the extent to which a theme is addressed at a given point in time depends on age- and developmental appropriateness as well as on proficiency level.

  • Integration of technology within the CPIs necessitates its use as a tool in instruction and assessment.


One World Languages Standard
The reorganization of the previous world languages standards into one revised standard reflects the framework, graphically depicted below, that was developed for the 2004 National Association of Educational Progress (NAEP) in foreign languages.

The NAEP graphic illustrates that the overarching goal of language instruction is the development of students’ communicative skills (the central “C” of five Cs in the graphic is for “communication”). Students should be provided ample opportunities to engage in conversations, present information to a known audience, and interpret authentic materials in the language of study. In addition, to develop linguistic proficiency, a meaningful context for language use must be established. The four Cs in the outer ring of the graphic (cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) provide this meaningful context for language learning. These contexts stress (1) the teaching of culture; (2) the study and reinforcement of content from other disciplines; (3) the comparison of target and native languages and cultures; and (4) opportunities to interact with native speakers of languages. As such, the four context Cs serve as the basis for instructional activities and are fully embedded within the world languages communication objectives.
View two videos (#12 and #30) that illustrate the integration of the five Cs.
Three Strands
The revised world languages standard continues to include three strands, one for each of the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational (in the NAEP graphic, these are shown around the inner triangle).
Strand A reflects the Interpretive Mode of communication, in which students demonstrate understanding of spoken and written communication within appropriate cultural contexts. Examples of this kind of “one-way” reading or listening include cultural interpretations of printed texts, videos, online texts, movies, radio and television broadcasts, and speeches. Beyond the Novice level, “interpretation” differs from “comprehension” because it implies the ability to read or listen “between the lines” and “beyond the lines.” For more on the interpretive mode of communication:


  • Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the interpretive mode (scroll down to video #1).

  • Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication.


Strand B reflects the Interpersonal Mode of communication, in which students engage in direct oral and/or written communication with others. Examples of this “two-way” communication include conversing face-to-face, participating in online discussions or videoconferences, instant messaging and text messaging, and exchanging personal letters or e-mail messages. For more on the interpersonal mode of communication:


  • Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the interpersonal mode (scroll down to video #2.

  • Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication.

Strand C reflects the Presentational Mode of communication, in which students present, orally and/or in writing, information, concepts and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers with whom there is no immediate interaction. Examples of this “one-to-many” mode of communication include a presentation to a group, posting an online video or webpage, creating and posting a podcast or videocast, and writing an article for a newspaper.




  • Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the presentational mode (scroll down to video #3)

  • Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication.


The Role of Grammar in the World Languages Class
While knowledge of the grammar of a language (e.g., rules for syntax, tense, and other elements of usage) is not an explicit goal of the revised New Jersey World Languages standard, grammar plays a supporting role in allowing students to achieve the stated linguistic proficiency goals. Grammar is one tool that supports the attainment of the stated linguistic goals; others tools include knowledge of vocabulary, sociolinguistic knowledge, understanding of cultural appropriateness, and grasp of communication strategies.
Students who are provided with ample opportunities to create meaning and use critical thinking skills in a language of study achieve linguistic proficiency. Research has established that all grammar learning must take place within a meaningful context, with the focus on producing structures to support communication.

Education in World Languages: Advocacy and Resources


  • Information regarding federal grants for implementing standards-based world languages programs may be found on the Foreign Language Assistance Program (FLAP) or the Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL) websites. JNCL also provides advocacy materials.

  • The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) provides extensive research related to the ways that language learning benefits students by supporting academic achievement, cognitive development, and positive attitudes and beliefs about languages and cultures.

  • An Annotated Glossary With Resources, instructions for How To Select Culturally Authentic Materials Based On Proficiency Level, and a World Languages Performance-Level Descriptors Table were designed in connection with the World Languages standard to support implementation of world languages instruction.

  • The most comprehensive report compiled on the status of world languages education in New Jersey’s public schools (2005), A Report on the State of World Languages Implementation in New Jersey, is available on the New Jersey Department of Education World Languages homepage.

  • The state language organization—Foreign Language Educators of New Jersey (FLENJ)—offers links to a variety of language resources, professional development opportunities, and information about student and professional awards and scholarships.


References

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1998). ACTFL performance guidelines for K-12 learners. Yonkers, NY: Author.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1999). ACTFL proficiency guidelines—speaking. Retrieved January 8, 2009, from http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1999). ACTFL proficiency guidelines—writing. Retrieved January 8, 2009, from http://www.actfl.org/files/public/writingguidelines.pdf

Asia Society. (2008). Putting the world into world-class education: State innovations and opportunities. Retrieved July 20, 2009, from http://www.asiasociety.org/files/stateinnovations.pdf

Falsgraf, C. (Ed.). (2007). Foreign language units for all proficiency levels. Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education.

Jensen, J., Sandrock, P., & Franklin, J. (2007). The essentials of world languages, grades K-12: Effective curriculum, instruction and assessment: Priorities in practice. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Lightbown, P., & Spada, N. (2006). How languages are learned. Oxford, England: Oxford Press.

Met, M. (2001). Why language learning matters. Educational Leadership, 59(2), 36-40.

National Assessment Governing Board. (2000). Framework for the 2004 foreign language National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: Author. Online: http://www.nagb.org/publications/frameworks/FinalFrameworkPrePubEdition1.pdf

National Standards in Foreign Language Education Project. (2006). Standards for foreign language learning in the 21st century. Lawrence, KS: Allen Press, Inc.

New Jersey State Department of Education. (1999). New Jersey world languages curriculum framework. Trenton, NJ: Author.

New Jersey State Department of Education. (2004). Core curriculum content standards. Trenton, NJ: Author.

New Jersey State Department of Education. (2005). A report on the state of world languages implementation in New Jersey. Trenton, NJ: Author. Online: http://www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/wl/stateofwl.pdf

New Jersey State Department of Education & Center for Applied Second Language Studies. (2008). Policy, assessment, and professional development: Results from a statewide study. Trenton, NJ: Author. Online: http://www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/wl/g8assess/njflap2.htm

Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2005). Framework for 21st century learning. Online: http://www.21stcenturyskills.org

Wong, W., & Van Patten, B. (2003). The evidence is in, drills are out. Foreign Language Annals, 36(3), 403-423.


Content Area

World Languages

Standard

7.1 World Languages: All students will be able to use a world language in addition to English to engage in meaningful conversation, to understand and interpret spoken and written language, and to present information, concepts, and ideas, while also gaining an understanding of the perspectives of other cultures. Through language study, they will make connections with other content areas, compare the language and culture studied with their own, and participate in home and global communities.

Strand

A. Interpretive Mode



Proficiency Level

Content Statement

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Novice-Mid



Linguistic:

The Novice-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the word level and can independently identify and recognize memorized words and phrases that bring meaning to text.


Cultural:

Personal identity is developed through experiences that occur within one’s family, one’s community, and the culture at large. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: self, friends, family, pets, physical/personality descriptions, school, likes/dislikes, and pastimes.)


Observing and participating in culturally authentic activities contribute to familiarization with cultural products and practices. (Topics and activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: authentic celebrations, songs, and dances.)
Healthy eating habits and fitness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: foods, shopping, eating at home or in restaurants, and wellness practices.)
Many products and practices related to home and community are shared across cultures; others are culture-specific. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: home life, places in the community, activities within the community, and travel.)
What is perceived as “basic needs” varies among and within cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: safety, food, shelter, and purchase and sale of goods such as toys, games, travel, and luxury items.)
Maps, graphs, and other graphic organizers facilitate understanding of information on a wide range of topics related to the world and global issues. They make complex concepts more accessible to second-language learners who have limited proficiency in the language.

(Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, economics, science, and geography.)


Learning about age- and developmentally appropriate content that is of high interest to students and has a direct connection to the cultural contexts of the target language cultivates an awareness of the shared human experience. (Content that assists in the development of this understanding should include, but is not limited to: all content areas and popular culture.)

7.1.NM.A.1

Recognize familiar spoken or written words and phrases contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

7.1.NM.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of simple, oral and written directions, commands, and requests through appropriate physical response.

7.1.NM.A.3

Recognize a few common gestures and cultural practices associated with the target culture(s).

7.1.NM.A.4

Identify familiar people, places, and objects based on simple oral and/or written descriptions.

7.1.NM.A.5


Demonstrate comprehension of brief oral and written messages using age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials on familiar topics.

Novice-High



Linguistic:

The Novice-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the word level to understanding and communicating at the sentence level and can use words, lists, and simple sentences independently to:

Identify the main idea and some supporting details when reading.

Understand the gist and some supporting details of conversations dealing with everyday life.

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words when used in familiar contexts.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.NH.A.1

Recognize familiar words and phrases, understand the main idea, and infer the meaning of some highly contextualized, unfamiliar spoken or written words contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

7.1.NH.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of a series of oral and written directions, commands, and requests through appropriate physical response.

7.1.NH.A.3

Recognize some common gestures and cultural practices associated with target culture(s).

7.1.NH.A.4

Identify people, places, objects, and activities in daily life based on oral or written descriptions.

7.1.NH.A.5

Demonstrate comprehension of short conversations and brief written messages on familiar topics.

7.1.NH.A.6

Identify the main idea and other significant ideas in readings from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials.

Intermediate-Low

Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

Identify the main idea and some supporting details when reading.

Understand the gist and some supporting details of conversations dealing with everyday life.

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words when used in familiar contexts.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.IL.A.1

Identify the main idea and most supporting details contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

7.1.IL.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of oral and written instructions connected to daily activities through appropriate responses.

7.1.IL.A.3

Compare and contrast the use of verbal and non-verbal etiquette (i.e., the use of gestures, intonation, and cultural practices) in the target culture(s) and in one’s own culture.

7.1.IL.A.4

Use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities learned about through oral or written descriptions.

7.1.IL.A.5

Demonstrate comprehension of conversations and written information on a variety of topics.

7.1.IL.A.6

Identify the main idea, theme, and most supporting details in readings from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials.

7.1.IL.A.7

Infer the meaning of a few unfamiliar words in some new contexts.

7.1.IL.A.8

Compare and contrast unique linguistic elements in English and the target language.

Intermediate-Mid

Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use strings of sentences independently to:

Identify the main idea and some supporting details when reading.

Understand the gist and some supporting details of conversations dealing with everyday life.

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words when used in familiar contexts.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.IM.A.1

Compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

7.1.IM.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of oral and written instructions connected to daily activities and to some unfamiliar situations through appropriate responses.

7.1.IM.A.3

Analyze the use of verbal and non-verbal etiquette (i.e., gestures, intonation, and cultural practices) in the target culture(s) to determine the meaning of a message.

7.1.IM.A.4

Use target language to paraphrase what is heard or read in oral or written descriptions of people, places, objects, and daily activities.

7.1.IM.A.5

Comprehend conversations and written information on a variety of familiar and some unfamiliar topics.

7.1.IM.A.6

Compare and contrast the main idea, theme, main characters, and setting in readings from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials.

7.1.IM.A.7

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words in some new contexts.

7.1.IM.A.8

Use knowledge of structures of the target language to deduce meaning of new and unfamiliar structures.

Intermediate-High


Linguistic:

The Intermediate-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the sentence level to understanding and communicating at the paragraph level and can use connected sentences and paragraphs independently to:

Analyze written and oral text.

Synthesize written and oral text.

Identify most supporting details in written and oral text.

Infer meaning of unfamiliar words in new contexts.

Infer and interpret author’s intent.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Identify the organizing principle in written and oral text.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience.

(Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)


Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers that may not yet exist. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.IH.A.1

Analyze and critique information contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to a variety of familiar and some unfamiliar topics.

7.1.IH.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of spoken and written language, as expressed by speakers of the target language in formal and informal settings, through appropriate responses.

7.1.IH.A.3

Compare and contrast the use of verbal and non-verbal etiquette to perform a variety of functions (such as persuading, negotiating, or offering advice) in the target culture(s) and in one’s own culture.

7.1.IH.A.4

Analyze historical and political contexts that connect or have connected famous people, places, and events from the target culture(s) with the United States.

7.1.IH.A.5

Synthesize information from oral and written discourse dealing with a variety of topics.

7.1.IH.A.6

Analyze and critique readings from culturally authentic materials.

7.1.IH.A.7

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words and phrases in new formal and informal contexts.

7.1.IH.A.8

Analyze structures of the target language and comparable linguistic structures in English.

Advanced-Low


Linguistic:

The Advanced-Low language learner understands and communicates at the paragraph level and can use paragraph-level discourse independently to:

Analyze written and oral text.

Synthesize written and oral text.

Identify most supporting details in written and oral text.

Infer meaning of unfamiliar words in new contexts.

Infer and interpret author’s intent.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Identify the organizing principle in written and oral text.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience.

(Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)


Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers that may not yet exist. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.AL.A.1

Analyze and critique the validity of culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

7.1.AL.A.2

Demonstrate comprehension of spoken and written language and nuances of culture, as expressed by speakers of the target language, in informal and some formal settings.

7.1. AL.A.3

Analyze the use of verbal and non-verbal etiquette in the target culture(s) and in one’s own culture to develop an understanding of how cultural perspectives are reflected in cultural products and cultural practices.

7.1.AL.A.4

Evaluate, from multiple cultural perspectives, the historical, political, and present-day contexts that connect or have connected famous people, places, and events from the target culture(s) with the United States.

7.1.AL.A.5

Evaluate information from oral and written discourse dealing with a variety of topics.

7.1.AL.A.6

Analyze and critique readings on less familiar topics using a variety of culturally authentic texts and genres.

7.1.AL.A.7

Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words and phrases in academic and formal contexts.

7.1.AL.A.8

Analyze elements of the target language that do not have a comparable linguistic element in English.



Content Area

World Languages

Standard

7.1 World Languages: All students will be able to use a world language in addition to English to engage in meaningful conversation, to understand and interpret spoken and written language, and to present information, concepts, and ideas, while also gaining an understanding of the perspectives of other cultures. Through language study, they will make connections with other content areas, compare the language and culture studied with their own, and participate in home and global communities.

Strand

B. Interpersonal Mode

Proficiency Level

Content Statement


CPI #


Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Novice-Mid

Linguistic:

The Novice-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the word level and can use memorized words and phrases independently to:

Respond to learned questions.

Ask memorized questions.

State needs and preferences.

Describe people, places, and things.


Cultural:

Personal identity is developed through experiences that occur within one’s family, one’s community, and the culture at large. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: self, friends, family, pets, physical/personality descriptions, school, likes/dislikes, and pastimes.)


Observing and participating in culturally authentic activities contribute to familiarization with cultural products and practices. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: authentic celebrations, songs, and dances.)
Healthy eating habits and fitness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: foods, shopping, eating at home or in restaurants, and wellness practices.)
Many products and practices related to home and community are shared across cultures; others are culture-specific. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: home life, places in the community, activities within the community, and travel.)
What is perceived as “basic needs” varies among and within cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: safety, food, shelter, and the purchase and sale of goods, such as toys, games, travel, and luxury items.)
Maps, graphs, and other graphic organizers facilitate understanding of information on a wide range of topics related to the world and global issues. They make complex concepts more accessible to second-language learners who have limited proficiency in the language. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, economics, science, and geography).
Learning about age- and developmentally appropriate content that is of high interest to students and has a direct connection to the cultural contexts of the target language cultivates an awareness of the shared human experience. (Content that assists in the development of this understanding should include, but is not limited to: all content areas and popular culture.)

7.1.NM.B.1

Use digital tools to exchange basic information at the word and memorized-phrase level related to self and targeted themes.

7.1.NM.B.2

Give and follow simple oral and written directions, commands, and requests when participating in age-appropriate classroom and cultural activities.

7.1.NM.B.3

Imitate appropriate gestures and intonation of the target culture(s)/language during greetings, leave-takings, and daily interactions.

7.1.NM.B.4

Ask and respond to simple questions, make requests, and express preferences using memorized words and phrases.

7.1.NM.B.5

Exchange information using words, phrases, and short sentences practiced in class on familiar topics or on topics studied in other content areas.

Novice-High


Linguistic:

The Novice-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the word level to understanding and communicating at the sentence level and can use words, lists, and simple sentences independently to:

Ask and answer questions related to everyday life.

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life:

Initiate, maintain, and end a conversation.

Ask for and give permission.

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Request, suggest, and make arrangements.

Extend, accept, and decline an invitation.

Express an opinion and preference.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government sites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.NH.B.1

Use digital tools to exchange basic information by recombining memorized words, phrases, and sentences on topics related to self and targeted themes.

7.1.NH.B.2

Give and follow a series of oral and written directions, commands, and requests for participating in age- and level- appropriate classroom and cultural activities.

7.1.NH.B.3

Imitate appropriate gestures, intonation, and common idiomatic expressions of the target culture(s)/language during daily interactions.

7.1.NH.B.4

Ask and respond to questions, make requests, and express preferences in various social situations.

7.1.NH.B.5

Converse on a variety of familiar topics and/or topics studied in other content areas.

Intermediate-Low


Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

Ask and answer questions related to everyday life.

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life:

Initiate, maintain, and end a conversation.

Ask for and give permission.

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Request, suggest, and make arrangements.

Extend, accept, and decline an invitation.

Express an opinion and preference.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government sites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)


7.1.IL.B.1

Use digital tools to participate in short conversations and to exchange information related to targeted themes.

7.1.IL.B.2

Give and follow a series of oral and written directions, commands, and requests for participating in age- and level-appropriate classroom and cultural activities.

7.1.IL.B.3

Use appropriate gestures, intonation, and common idiomatic expressions of the target culture(s)/language in familiar situations.

7.1.IL.B.4

Ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions of a personal nature or on school-related topics.

7.1.IL.B.5

Engage in short conversations about personal experiences or events and/or topics studied in other content areas.

Intermediate-Mid


Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use strings of sentences independently to:

Ask and answer questions related to everyday life.

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life:

Initiate, maintain, and end a conversation.

Ask for and give permission.

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Request, suggest, and make arrangements.

Extend, accept, and decline an invitation.

Express an opinion and preference.
Cultural:

Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government sites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.IM.B.1

Use digital tools to participate in short conversations and to exchange information related to a variety of familiar topics and some unfamiliar topics.

7.1.IM.B.2

Give and follow a series of oral and written directions, commands, and requests for participating in age- and level-appropriate classroom and cultural activities in familiar and some unfamiliar situations.

7.1.IM.B.3

Use appropriate gestures, intonation, and common idiomatic expressions of the target culture(s)/language in familiar and some unfamiliar situations.

7.1.IM.B.4

Ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions of a personal nature, on school-related topics, and on some unfamiliar topics and situations.

7.1.IM.B.5

Engage in short conversations about personal experiences or events, topics studied in other content areas, and some unfamiliar topics and situations.

Intermediate-High

Linguistic:

The Intermediate-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the sentence level to understanding and communicating at the paragraph level and can use connected sentences and paragraphs independently to:

Infer meaning of unfamiliar words in new contexts.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Narrate and describe across a wide-range of topics.

Compare and contrast.

Offer and support opinions.

Persuade someone to change a point of view.

Make and change plans.

Offer advice.

Handle a situation with a complication.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)
Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.IH.B.1

Use digital tools to participate in extended conversations using a variety of timeframes to exchange information.

7.1.IH.B.2

Give, respond to, and ask for clarification on detailed oral and written directions, commands, and requests.

7.1.IH.B.3

Interact in a variety of familiar situations using culturally appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication strategies.

7.1.IH.B.4

Ask and respond to questions as part of a group discussion of topics and situations of a personal, academic, or social nature.

7.1.IH.B.5

Engage in oral and/or written discourse in a variety of timeframes on topics of personal or social interest or on topics studied in other content areas.

7.1.IH.B.6

Use language in a variety of settings to further personal and/or academic goals.

Advanced-Low

Linguistic:

The Advanced-Low language learner understands and communicates at the paragraph level and can use paragraph-level discourse independently to:

Infer meaning of unfamiliar words in new contexts.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Narrate and describe across a wide-range of topics.

Compare and contrast.

Offer and support opinions.

Persuade someone to change a point of view.

Make and change plans.

Offer advice.

Handle a situation with a complication.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)
Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.AL.B.1

Use digital tools to participate in extended conversations on topics of a personal, academic, or social nature using a variety of timeframes to exchange information.

7.1.AL.B.2

Give, respond to, and ask for clarification on detailed and complex oral and written directions, commands, and indirect requests.

7.1.AL.B.3

Interact in a variety of familiar and a few unfamiliar situations using culturally appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication strategies.

7.1.AL.B.4

Ask and respond to questions as part of a group discussion on topics of a personal, academic, or social nature in informal and some formal settings.

7.1.AL.B.5

Engage in oral and/or written discourse in a variety of timeframes on topics of personal or social interest, topics studied in other content areas, and some unfamiliar topics.

7.1.AL.B.6

Use language in a variety of settings to further personal, academic, and career goals.



Content Area

World Languages

Standard

7.1 World Languages: All students will be able to use a world language in addition to English to engage in meaningful conversation, to understand and interpret spoken and written language, and to present information, concepts, and ideas, while also gaining an understanding of the perspectives of other cultures. Through language study, they will make connections with other content areas, compare the language and culture studied with their own, and participate in home and global communities.

Strand

C. Presentational Mode

Proficiency

Level

Content Statement


CPI #


Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Novice-Mid


Linguistic:

The Novice-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the word level and can use memorized words and phrases independently to:

Make lists.

State needs and preferences.

Describe people, places, and things.
Cultural:

Personal identity is developed through experiences that occur within one’s family, one’s community, and the culture at large. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: self, friends, family, pets, physical/personality descriptions, school, likes/dislikes, and pastimes.)


Observing and participating in culturally authentic activities contribute to familiarization with cultural products and practices. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: authentic celebrations, songs, and dances.)
Healthy eating habits and fitness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: foods, shopping, eating at home or in restaurants, and wellness practices.)
Many products and practices related to home and community are shared across cultures; others are culture-specific. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: home life, places in the community, activities within the community, and travel.)
What is perceived as “basic needs” varies among and within cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: safety, food, shelter, and purchase and sale of goods, such as toys, games, travel, and luxury items.)
Maps, graphs, and other graphic organizers facilitate understanding of information on a wide range of topics related to the world and global issues. They make complex concepts more accessible to second-language learners who have limited proficiency in the language. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, economics, science, and geography.)
Learning about age- and developmentally appropriate content that is of high interest to students and has a direct connection to the cultural contexts of the target language cultivates an awareness of the shared human experience. (Content that assists in the development of this understanding should include, but is not limited to: all content areas and popular culture.)

7.1.NM.C.1

Use basic information at the word and memorized-phrase level to create a multimedia-rich presentation on targeted themes to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.NM.C.2

Imitate, recite, and/or dramatize simple poetry, rhymes, songs, and skits.

7.1.NM.C.3

Copy/write words, phrases, or simple guided texts on familiar topics.

7.1.NM.C.4

Present information from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials orally or in writing.

7.1.NM.C.5

Name and label tangible cultural products and imitate cultural practices from the target culture(s).

Novice-High



Linguistic:

The Novice-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the word level to understanding and communicating at the sentence level and can use words, lists, and simple sentences independently to:

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life:

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Express an opinion and preference.

Request and suggest.
Cultural:

Immigration changes the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.NH.C.1

Recombine basic information at the word and sentence level related to self and targeted themes to create a multimedia-rich presentation to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.NH.C.2

Create and present brief messages, poems, rhymes, songs, short plays, or role-plays using familiar vocabulary orally or in writing.

7.1.NH.C.3

Describe in writing people and things from the home and school environment.

7.1.NH.C.4

Tell or retell stories from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials orally or in writing.

7.1.NH.C.5

Tell or write about cultural products associated with the target culture(s), and simulate common cultural practices.

Intermediate-Low



Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Express an opinion and preference.

Request and suggest.
Cultural:

Immigration changes the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.IL.C.1

Use knowledge about cultural products and cultural practices to create a multimedia-rich presentation on targeted themes to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.IL.C.2

Present student-created and/or authentic short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories, or reports.

7.1.IL.C.3

Use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

7.1.IL.C.4

Compare and contrast age- and level-appropriate culturally authentic materials orally and in writing.

7.1.IL.C.5

Compare and contrast cultural products and cultural practices associated with the target culture(s) and one’s own culture, orally, in writing, or through simulation.

7.1.IL.C.6

Summarize requirements for professions/careers that require proficiency in a language other than English based on exploration of the 16 Career Clusters.

Intermediate-Mid


Linguistic:

The Intermediate-Mid language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use strings of sentences independently to:

Handle simple transactions related to everyday life

Express needs.

Give reasons.

Express an opinion and preference.

Request and suggest.
Cultural:

Immigration changes the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)


The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)
Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)
Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)
Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)
The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)
Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)
Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)
Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

7.1.IM.C.1

Synthesize information related to the cultural products, cultural practices, and cultural perspectives associated with targeted culture(s) to create a multimedia-rich presentation on targeted themes to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.IM.C.2

Dramatize student-created and/or authentic short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories, or reports.

7.1.IM.C.3

Use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts about familiar and some unfamiliar situations.

7.1.IM.C.4

Synthesize information found in age- and level-appropriate culturally authentic materials.

7.1.IM.C.5

Compare the cultural perspectives of the target culture(s) with those of one’s own culture, as evidenced through the cultural products and cultural practices associated with each.

Intermediate-High


Linguistic:

The Intermediate-High language learner has progressed from understanding and communicating at the sentence level to understanding and communicating at the paragraph level and can use connected sentences and paragraphs independently to:

Synthesize written and oral text.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Narrate and describe across a wide-range of topics.

Compare and contrast.

Offer and support opinions.

Persuade someone to change a point of view.

Offer advice.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)
Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.IH.C.1

Explain and compare how a cultural perspective led to the development of a cultural product or cultural practice in the target culture(s) and in one’s own culture, through a multimedia-rich presentation to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.IH.C.2

Create and perform stories, poems, short plays, or oral reports based on personal experiences and/or that reflect cultural perspectives associated with the target culture(s).

7.1.IH.C.3

Use language creatively in writing for a variety of purposes.

7.1.IH.C.4

Explain the structural elements and/or cultural perspectives found in culturally authentic materials.

7.1.IH.C.5

Explain cultural perspectives associated with the target culture(s), as evidenced by the cultural products and cultural practices associated with the target culture(s), and compare these perspectives with those of one’s own culture.

7.1.IH.C.6

Explain/demonstrate cross-cultural skills needed for a variety of professions and careers within the global workforce.

Advanced-Low


Linguistic:

The Advanced-Low language learner understands and communicates at the paragraph level and can paragraph-level discourse independently to:

Synthesize written and oral text.

Identify some cultural perspectives.

Narrate and describe across a wide-range of topics.

Compare and contrast.

Offer and support opinions.

Persuade someone to change a point of view.

Offer advice.
Cultural:

Collecting, sharing, and analyzing data related to global issues, problems, and challenges lead to an understanding of the role cultural perspectives play in how these issues are perceived and how they are addressed. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)


Being able to view one’s own culture through the lens of others assists in understanding global issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: freedom of speech and other civil, international, and human rights, as they relate to a variety of issues.)
Observing and/or participating in the four art forms, across and within cultures, lead to an understanding of the shared human experience. (Topics/activities that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: aesthetics and the creation and performance of dance, music, theater, and visual arts.)
Citizens who can communicate in more than one language have unprecedented career opportunities, marketability, and earning potential. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Modifying a Personalized Student Learning Plan requires an understanding of one’s own skill set and preferences, knowing one’s proficiency level in a second language, and developing transfer skills to prepare for careers. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: career awareness, exploration, and preparation and business, financial, economic, and entrepreneurial literacy.)
Examination of the roles of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion through world history and across cultures assists in understanding the current sociopolitical landscape. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, social sciences, and world literatures.)

7.1.AL.C.1

Create a research-based multimedia-rich presentation to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

7.1.AL.C.2

Create a research-based analysis of a current global problem/issue showing cultural perspectives associated with the target culture(s) and another world culture.

7.1.AL.C.3

Use language creatively in writing for personal, career, or academic purposes.

7.1.AL.C.4

Compare and contrast the structural elements and/or cultural perspectives found in culturally authentic materials with those found in selections in English.

7.1.AL.C.5

Analyze how cultural perspectives about a specific cultural product or cultural practice associated with the target culture(s) change over time, and compare with changing perspectives in one’s own culture.

7.1.AL.C.6

Create an electronic portfolio in the target language with artifacts documenting language proficiency, cross-cultural awareness and experiences, and other qualifications that support the goals of the Personalized Student Learning Plan.



HOW TO SELECT CULTURALLY AUTHENTIC MATERIALS BASED ON PROFICIENCY LEVEL


NOVICE-MID TEXTS
Novice-Mid-level students require short texts related to everyday personal experiences. Texts that are highly contextualized, supported by visual cues, and contain repetition of key words and phrases are appropriate for Novice-Mid-level learners. Interpretive tasks designed at the Novice-Mid level ask students to recognize key words and to identify important words, phrases, and main ideas.

NOVICE-HIGH TO INTERMEDIATE-MID TEXTS
The same texts may be used for Novice-High-level students through Intermediate-Midlevel students; however, the task changes. At the Intermediate level, students continue to look for main ideas, but also identify supporting details and derive meaning from context.
INTERMEDIATE-HIGH TEXTS
Text used at the previous levels may also be used with Intermediate-High-level students; however, the task changes. At the Intermediate-High level, students continue to look for main ideas, identify supporting details, and derive meaning from context, while they also begin to infer meaning, identify the author’s perspective, compare cultural perspectives, and recognize the organizing principle of a text.

ADVANCED-LOW TEXTS
Text used at the previous levels may also be used with Advanced-Low level students; however, the task changes. At the Advanced-Low level, students continue to infer meaning, identify the author’s perspective, compare cultural perspectives, and recognize the organizing principle of the text while they also begin to analyze and evaluate text for facts and opinions.
Suggested culturally authentic texts for interpretive reading tasks:
Novice-Mid Level

Blogs


Brochures

Calendars and schedules

Children’s stories and poems related to novice contexts

Directions

Highly contextualized advertisements from a target country publication (print or online)

ID cards

Maps

Menus


Movie schedules

Online weather reports

Report cards

Simple biographies from a target culture magazine (print or online)

Simple letters or email correspondence

Social networking sites

Sports schedules

Stories/songs

Student schedules
Novice-High Through Intermediate-Mid Level

In addition to the above Novice-Mid level texts:

Advice columns

Photo stories with captions

Simple stories
Intermediate-High Level

In addition to all above texts:

Authentic short stories

Contextualized comic strips

Essays or editorials from newspapers

Personal letters


Advanced-Low Level

In addition to all above texts:

Editorials

Novels
Suggested culturally authentic texts for interpretive listening/viewing tasks:


Novice-Mid Level

Commercials from television, radio, Internet

Podcasts

Simple interviews, conversations, or surveys related to Novice content

Songs related to Novice content

Straightforward public service announcements from television, radio, Internet

Video clips
Novice-High Through Intermediate-Mid Level

In addition to the above Novice-Mid level texts:

Movie trailers

Selected clips from movies

Simple segments from television programs, such as soap operas or talk shows
Intermediate-High Level

In addition to all above texts:

Contextualized animated cartoons

Television shows on familiar topics


Advanced-Low Level

In addition to all above texts:

Full-length movies





WORLD LANGUAGES PERFORMANCE LEVEL DESCRIPTORS*

TEXT TYPE

Quantity of Language Produced

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE- MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Words, phrases, and memorized simple sentences

Words, lists, and simple sentences

Simple sentences

Strings of sentences

Connected sentences and paragraphs

Paragraph-level discourse

LANGUAGE CONTROL

Grammatical Accuracy

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE-MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Accurate when producing memorized language

Inconsistently accurate
Most accurate when expressing one’s own ideas on previously studied and familiar topics
Minimally accurate as creativity in language and/or production increases

Inconsistently accurate
Most accurate when expressing one’s own ideas on previously studied and familiar topics

Minimally accurate as creativity in language and/or production increases



Evidence of control of grammar when using simple sentences and basic verb forms
Demonstrates some ability to use grammatical and stylistically cohesive elements

Generally accurate when narrating and describing in present time
Less accurate in past and future time
Applies familiar structures to new situations

Sustained control of simple target-language sentence structures and partial control of more complex structures
Grammatical unevenness with some control of aspect
Some grammatical errors in control of aspect

VOCABULARY USE

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE-MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Comprehends and produces vocabulary related to common objects and actions in familiar categories
Uses words and phrases primarily as lexical items without awareness of grammatical structure


Comprehends and produces an expanding amount of vocabulary from previously studied themes
Understands and uses a few memorized idiomatic expressions
Uses false cognates (for languages that contain English cognates)

Comprehends and produces vocabulary from a limited number of themes not previously studied
Understands and uses a limited number of idiomatic expressions
Uses false cognates (for languages that contain English cognates)

Comprehends and produces vocabulary on a wider range of everyday themes
Understands and uses some idiomatic expressions and culturally authentic expressions
Searches for adequate vocabulary

Comprehends and produces vocabulary from an expanding variety of themes

Understands and uses idiomatic expressions and culturally authentic expressions


Uses specialized and precise vocabulary for a limited number of topics

Comprehends and produces vocabulary on an expanding variety of themes, including some abstract topics related to interest and aptitude
Understands and uses idiomatic expressions and culturally authentic expressions
Uses specialized and precise vocabulary for a wider range of topics
Employs generic vocabulary

COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

Techniques to understand and to be understood

As students progress through proficiency levels, they gain stronger control of the strategies acquired at previous levels while beginning to use new strategies characteristic of the targeted proficiency level.


INTERPRETIVE

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE-MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Identifies a limited number of cognates and loanwords to aid comprehension
Uses visual cues to aid comprehension
Uses background experience to enhance comprehension

Identifies some cognates, loanwords, word families, roots, prefixes, and suffixes to aid comprehension
Skims and scans
Infers meaning of some unfamiliar words to aid comprehension
Predicts


Identifies a wide range of cognates, loanwords, word families, roots, prefixes, and suffixes to aid comprehension
Infers meaning of unfamiliar words to aid comprehension

Uses contextual clues


Occasionally uses some resources such as target language dictionaries and online resources to aid comprehension
Rereads
May paraphrase when reading or listening; asks questions of self about text
Identifies type of text (narrative, expository, persuasive)
Synthesizes
Summarizes
Evaluates
Skips over unfamiliar words (in order to be successful, reader/listener must already have a wide range of known vocabulary to use this strategy)

Uses knowledge of own culture and target culture to deduce meaning
Derives meaning by examining familiar and unfamiliar structures
Effectively uses resources, such as target language dictionaries and online resources, to aid comprehension

Identifies the organizing principle(s) of oral or written text
Infers and interprets the intent of the author



Handles linguistic challenges with a complication or handles an unexpected turn of events within familiar contexts and routine situations

INTERPERSONAL

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE-MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Uses gestures and sometimes resorts to English
Repeats
Is understood by sympathetic speakers used to dealing with language learners


Generally, but not always:
Asks for clarification
Uses limited circumlocution
Self-corrects when

not understood


Repeats and asks for repetition
Paraphrases
Imitates modeled words
States lack of understanding
Is understood by sympathetic speakers used to dealing with non-natives


Minimally:
Asks for clarification
Uses some cohesive devices
Uses limited circumlocution
Self-corrects when

not understood


Repeats and asks for repetition
Paraphrases
Imitates modeled words
States lack of understanding
Is generally understood by sympathetic speakers, particularly by those accustomed to dealing with non-natives

Consistently:
Asks for clarification
Uses some cohesive devices
Uses circumlocution
Occasionally self-corrects when not needed for comprehension
Is understood by sympathetic native speakers accustomed to dealing with non-natives

Uses cohesive devices
Probes for details in order to clarify meaning
Uses circumlocution
Self-corrects even when not needed for comprehension
Is generally understood by native speakers of the target language unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives

Rephrases
Conveys message without misrepresentation or confusion
Is understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives

PRESENTATIONAL

NOVICE-MID

NOVICE-HIGH

INTERMEDIATE-LOW

INTERMEDIATE-MID

INTERMEDIATE-HIGH

ADVANCED-LOW

Uses gestures and sometimes resorts to English
Repeats
Is understood by sympathetic speakers used to dealing with language learners.

Generally, but not always:
Uses limited circumlocution
Repeats
Paraphrases
Self-corrects when not understood
Is understood by sympathetic speakers used to dealing with non-natives


Minimally:
Uses limited circumlocution
Uses some cohesive devices
Repeats
Paraphrases
Self-corrects when not understood
Is generally understood by sympathetic speakers, particularly by those accustomed to dealing with non-natives

Consistently:
Uses circumlocution
Uses some cohesive devices

Occasionally self-corrects when not needed for comprehension


Is understood by sympathetic native speakers accustomed to dealing with non-natives

Uses circumlocution
Uses cohesive devices to organize presentation
Self-corrects even when not needed for comprehension
Is generally understood by native speakers of the target language unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives

Rephrases
Conveys message without misrepresentation or confusion
Is understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives

* The ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners (ACTFL, 1998), ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines - Speaking (ACTFL, 1999), and ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines - Writing (ACTFL, 2001) were used to inform the development World Languages Performance Level Descriptors table.

Annotated Glossary With Resources


Accommodations: Modifications made in instruction and/or assessment that address the specific needs of individual students.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on how to meet the needs of all learners in the world languages class. Scroll down to video #6.

 The 1996 New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework contains several chapters related to accommodations:

Instructional Strategies and Student Learning Characteristics

Instructional Adaptations for Students with Diverse Needs

Instructional Strategies

 Click http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/ for an interactive wiki site dedicated to differentiation strategies.


Advanced-Low Level Learners: Students communicate using paragraph-level discourse to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.
Articulation: The smooth transition from one level of proficiency to the next along the continuum of language learning.
Authentic Assessment: Assessment tasks that evoke demonstration of knowledge and skills in ways that they are applied in the “real world.”

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on how to assess the modes of communication. Scroll down to video #7.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of Classroom Practices to view assessment in practice. Scroll down to video #30.

 Click CAPS TOAS to access Thematically Organized Assessments categorized by themes, topics, and levels of proficiency.

 Click Wisconsin Project for information related to world language assessment.
Career Clusters: Postsecondary education and career pathways.
The Center for Applied Linguistics: Resources of interest to world language educators, including many related to assessment.
Circumlocution: Talking around a word or phrase through definition or description.
Cognate: A word that looks like a word in another language and has a similar meaning.
Communities: The goal area of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century that targets participation in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view how to address communities. Scroll down to video #8.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of Classroom Practices to view how communities are included in a lesson in practice. Scroll down to video #14.
Comprehensible Input: Language that a learner already knows plus some new language made understandable through intentional and targeted strategies.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of Classroom Practices to view an example of how to provide comprehensible input. Scroll down to video #4.


Comprehensible Output Hypothesis: The supposition that second language acquisition depends on more than just comprehensible input and requires learners to produce language.
Continuum: The ongoing process of developing proficiency in the target language.
Cultural Content: Content that is reinforced or enhanced through the language studied.
Cultural Perspectives: Popular beliefs, commonly held values, folk ideas, shared values, and assumptions widely held by members of a culture.

 The perspectives of a culture sanction the cultural practices and create a need for the products.

 The perspectives provide the reason for “why they do it that way” and the explanation for “how can they possibly think that?”

 Since practices and products not only derive from perspectives, but sometimes interact to change perspectives, this fundamental component of culture must be incorporated to meet the world languages standard.



Cultural Practices: Practices of a culture that include patterns of acceptable behaviors for interacting with members of other cultures. Two examples from the American culture of the practice of expressing congratulations would be slapping a teammate on the back after a winning touchdown, but shaking the presenter’s hand after an excellent speech. The cultural content focuses on practices derived from the perspectives (traditional ideas, attitudes, and values) of the culture studied.
Cultural Products: Tangible (e.g., paintings, wedding veils, boiled peanuts, a pair of chopsticks) or intangible (e.g., street raps, systems of education, graveside eulogies) products that reflect the perspectives (attitudes, values, and beliefs) of the culture studied.
Culturally authentic material: Books, tapes, videos, games, and realia that have been produced for use by native speakers of the target language (also see How to Select Culturally Authentic Materials).
Edutopia: An interactive site that contains an archive of continually updated best practices.
ELL: Acronym for English language learners who are developing their listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities in English.
E-pals: An electronic platform that enables students, teachers, and classrooms in the global community to communicate about issues and topics, to collaborate on a variety of projects, and to engage in problem solving that incorporates multiple perspectives.
Formal and informal settings: The degree to which a setting requires adherence to specific communication procedures, rules, and decorum (with formal settings being more prescriptive than informal settings).
Formative Assessment: Ongoing evaluation of a student’s progress during a learning activity that is used to inform instruction and assists in tracking student progress. It is often referred to as assessment for learning.

 Click Wisconsin Project or New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework for information related to world languages assessment.


Four art forms: Dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts.
Geography: Area of study comprised of human geography, which focuses on the human-made environment and how space is created; physical geography, which examines the natural environment and interactions among climate, vegetation, soil, water, landforms, and life; and/or environmental geography, which includes both physical and human geography and also examines the interactions between the environment and humans.
Global Issues: Issues that have a significant impact, transcend political and geographical boundaries, are enduring, and are interconnected.
Graphic organizers: Visual representations of knowledge, concepts, or ideas that promote learning.

 Click New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework, Eduplace, and Teacher Vision for examples of graphic organizers.


Gouin Series: A series of short statements describing a logical sequence of actions within a specific context.
Holistic rating/scoring: A scoring procedure yielding a single score based upon a set of predetermined criteria, which generally puts the emphasis on what is done well rather than deficiencies.
Independently: What the learner can communicate spontaneously without guidance or support.
Information Gap Activity: An activity in which one person has information that another needs but does not have, and in which the answers are unknown to the questioner.
Integrated curriculum: Tasks that utilize students’ abilities to apply concepts, principles, and processes from two or more subject areas to a central question, theme, issue, or problem.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on how to integrate content into a world languages lesson. Scroll down to video #4.


Interdisciplinary: A curricular approach that applies knowledge from more than one discipline to examine a problem or topic.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of Classroom Practices to observe this concept in practice. Scroll down to videos #5 and #15.


Intermediate-High Level Learner: Students communicate using connected sentences and paragraphs to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.
Intermediate-Low Level Learner: Students communicate using simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.
Intermediate-Mid Level Learner: Students communicate using strings of sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.
Interpersonal Mode: The mode of communication in which students engage in direct oral and/or written communication with others (e.g., conversing face-to-face, participating in online discussions or videoconferences, instant messaging and text messaging, exchanging personal letters or e-mail messages).

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the Interpersonal Mode. Scroll down to video #2.

 Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication for information related to the modes of communication.
Interpretive Mode: The mode of communication in which students demonstrate understanding of spoken and written communication within the appropriate cultural context. Examples of “one-way” reading or listening include cultural interpretations of print, video, and online texts, movies, radio and television broadcasts, and speeches. Interpretation beyond the Novice level differs from comprehension because it implies the ability to read or listen “between the lines” and “beyond the lines.”

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the Interpretive Mode. Scroll down to video #1.

 Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication for information related to the modes of communication.
KWL Chart: A graphic organizer that assists in managing and organizing information around a specific theme or topic with K representing prior knowledge, W representing what one wants to learn, and L representing what one has learned.
Langsource: A searchable, annotated bibliographic database of language and culture resources. It can be used by both teachers and learners at all levels in a variety of languages including Arabic, Chinese, German, Hausa, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Quechua, Spanish, Tamil, and Yoruba.

Language Function: That which can be done with language to meet a communicative purpose. Greeting, leave taking, describing, and persuading are some examples of language functions.
Learning styles: Individual student cognitive, affective, and physiological behaviors that indicate how the student learns.

Linguafolio: A portfolio assessment instrument designed to support language learners in setting and achieving their goals for learning languages.
Loan words: Words taken from another language.
Merlot: An online education resource for teaching and learning languages where educators are encouraged to contribute and share lessons.
Modeling: The act of providing an example of what to do and how to do it; modeling helps to ensure that practice will take place as planned.
Multiple entry points: The grade levels at which students are given the opportunity to begin the study of a world language or add the study of another world language.
Multiple intelligences: A theory that individuals can learn in multiple ways and may demonstrate strength in one or more learning modalities.
National Foreign Language Resource Centers: Resource centers that promote the learning and teaching of foreign languages in the United States by creating language-learning materials, offering professional development, and conducting research on foreign language learning. Some centers focus on specific areas while others focus on foreign languages in general.
New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework:
 Click K-4 Learning Scenarios for Novice-Mid level learners.

 Click 5-8 Learning Scenarios for Novice-High level learners.

 Click 9-12 Learning Scenarios for Novice-High/Pre-Advanced (Intermediate-High) level learners.
Novice language learners: All beginner language learners regardless of what age or grade level they start the study of a world language.
Novice-High Level Learner: Students communicate using words, lists, and simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.
Novice-Mid Level Learner: Students communicate using memorized words and phrases to talk about familiar topics related to school, home, and the community.
Novice Writing Tasks: A form or document in which students supply simple requested information is an appropriate format for Novice students. Some examples of such forms include schedules, driver license applications, passport applications, e-pal applications, surveys, shopping lists, Venn diagrams, and story maps. Using strategies such as brainstorming and picture prompts help to bring learned vocabulary and structures to the working memory table.
Online Glossary: A resource that contains additional terms related to world languages.

PACE Model: A model for teaching grammar in context that consists of presentation of meaningful language, attention to form, co-construction of an explanation, and an extension activity with real-world application.

Performance Level Descriptors: Narrative descriptions of student performance representative of each performance level (e.g., Novice Mid, Novice High, and Intermediate Low). They provide a picture of “how well” students are able to use language. They assist educators, parents, and students in tracking progress and may be used to inform future instruction.
Physical Response: TPR (Total Physical Response) is an example of an instructional strategy that uses physical response.

 Click TPR and New Jersey Frameworks for additional information.


Population Reference Bureau: A website that offers resources related to global issues. Because the site provides links to graphics, these resources make complex topics accessible to language learners of all proficiency levels.
Portfolios: A purposeful, varied collection of evidence pertaining to student learning over time. They contain documentation of a range of student knowledge and skills
Pre-Instructional Strategies: Teaching strategies that assist in language instruction. Some examples include: choosing authentic material appropriate for the theme and context as well as the proficiency and cognitive level of the students; planning engaging tasks that allow students to practice language in situations they might encounter in the real world; and tapping into students’ interests and prior knowledge.
Presentational Mode: The mode of communication in which students present, through oral and/or written communications, information, concepts and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers with whom there is no immediate interaction. Examples of this “one-to-many” mode of communication are making a presentation to a group, posting an online video or webpage, creating and posting a podcast or videocast, and writing an article for a newspaper.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view a video on the Presentational Modes. Scroll down to video #3.

 Click Wisconsin Project: Modes of Communication for information related to the modes of communication.
Proficiency: The level of communicative competence. It refers to what an individual is able to do with language in all skill areas.
Role-playing: An activity in which students dramatize characters, solve a problem, or work through a situation.

Rubric: A scoring guide consisting of a set of general criteria used to evaluate a student’s performance in a given outcome area. Rubrics have a fixed measurement scale, a list of criteria that describe the characteristics of products or performances for each score point, and sample responses that illustrate the various score points on the scale.

 Click CAPS Rubrics to access rubrics used to rate student work from the Thematically Organized Assessments.

 Click New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework for additional information on rubrics.
Scaffolding: A strategy used to provide support to another speaker or writer that facilitates successful communication.
Second language acquisition: The process of internalizing the second language as opposed to simply memorizing the vocabulary and structures of the language; a process similar to the way children develop ability in their native language.
Signaling: A visible means of showing understanding. Two examples are thumbs up/thumbs down and indicating by the number of fingers shown how well one understands a concept. Three fingers may indicate complete understanding while one finger may indicate little understanding.
Story form: A strategy that engages students in meaningful, culturally authentic rich language. Use of story forms in the world language classroom assists students in making sense of language while tapping into their imagination.
Student work: Click CAPS Student Work to access student work from Thematically Organized Assessments.
Summative assessment: The process of evaluating and assigning a grade to student learning at the end of a unit of study. It is often referred to as assessment of learning. Click New Jersey World Languages Framework for additional information.
Talk aloud: A strategy that involves reporting how a task is approached and completed.
Target culture: The culture (e.g. history, literature, art, foods, politics, media, and social viewpoints) of the people who speak the target language.

 Click Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop to view how the teaching of culture is integrated into a language lesson. Scroll down to videos #5 and #12.


Target language: The language being learned.
Thematic Unit: A lesson of study that integrates several content areas while examining a broad topic of study centered around a particular theme.
TPS: Think-Pair-Share, a strategy that allows wait and think time and provides the teacher and the learner with immediate feedback.
Twenty-first Century Technologies: Technologies for students to interact with people from other cultures and to experience authentic cultural products and practices. The use of technology as an instructional strategy is therefore no longer an option; rather it is an indispensable tool that enables students to develop a growing understanding of cultural perspectives and the inextricable link between language and culture.

Digital Tools in the context of a world languages class, include applications and software that aid in communication. Some examples include video conferencing, texting, and IMing.

Electronic Information Sources consist of audio, video, and text available through a virtual format. Some examples include podcasts, videocasts, audio clips, and websites.

Multimedia Rich Presentations contain a combination of text, audio, still images, video, interactivity and animation.

Virtual Sharing requires the use of digital tools and may be done through electronic information sources such as a social community/educational site, electronic poster, or webpage.
TWPS: Think-Write-Pair-Share, a variation of Think-Pair-Share strategy that involves the written word.
Webbing: A strategy for developing and organizing ideas; the major topic is usually centered, with lines drawn to details, subtopics, etc.

 Click New Jersey World Languages Framework for additional information.


Wordchamp: A website that contains rollover definitions in more than 10 languages.
World Languages Framework Learning Scenarios Project:
 Click Animal Migration Unit for Novice-Mid level learners.

 Click The Monarch Unit for Novice-High level learners.

 Click Urban Parks Unit for Novice-High level learners.

 Click The Migration Unit for Intermediate Low/Pre-Advanced (Intermediate-High) level learners.


Whiteboards: Individual boards that students use to write responses allowing the teacher to quickly assess understanding and provide students with immediate feedback
Wiki: A collection of web pages dedicated to a specific topic that allows those with access to contribute and modify content.

 Click to view a technology wiki created as a result of participation in the World Languages Technology Institute.

 Click to access a Web 2.0 wiki.

 Click to access the Flat Classroom Project wiki.


Word Reference: A free online translator available in many languages that also contains a discussion forum.
Wyoming 6-8 Spanish: An online curriculum project for middle school Spanish that contains resources for Novice-Mid to Novice-High students.



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