Table of Contents statement of purpose 3



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INTERIM ASSESSMENT




Rubric for Cartoon Project: Written

CONTENT

4    Complete. The student clearly conveys the message and provides additional details that are relevant and interesting.


3    Generally complete. The student conveys the message, but does not provide adequate and relevant additional detail.
2    Somewhat incomplete. The message is unclear. Much additional detail is lacking or irrelevant.
1    Incomplete. The message is unclear. Details are nonexistent or random and irrelevant.

COMPREHENSIBILITY

4    Comprehensible. The student uses appropriate language to convey the message clearly.


3    Generally comprehensible. The language used is sometimes inadequate to make the message totally clear.
2    Somewhat incomprehensible. The message could only be understood by a sympathetic native reader due to inappropriate language.
1    Incomprehensible.

ACCURACY

4    Functions, grammar, and vocabulary are used correctly.


3    Minor problems in usage do not distort meaning or inhibit communication.
2    Problems in usage significantly distort meaning and inhibit communication in some instances.
1    Problems in usage completely distort meaning and inhibit communication.

EFFORT

4    Exceeds the minimum requirement of the assignment and provides evidence of thoughtful input. Actively demonstrates the message.


3    Fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment and provides evidence of thoughtful input.
2    Fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment but does not show evidence of thoughtful input.
1    Does not fulfill the minimum requirements of the assignment.
   

TOTAL POINTS:      /16

15-16 Excellent


13-14 Good
10-12 Satisfactory
< 9 Unsatisfactory

Teacher comments: _________________________________________________________________



Rubric for Cooking Video Presentation: Oral

CONTENT

4    Complete. The student clearly conveys the process and provides additional details that are relevant and interesting.


3    Generally complete. The student conveys the process, but does not provide adequate and relevant additional detail.
2    Somewhat incomplete. The process is unclear. Much additional detail is lacking or irrelevant.
1    Incomplete. The process is unclear. Details are nonexistent or random and irrelevant.

COMPREHENSIBILITY

4    Comprehensible. The student uses appropriate language to convey the process clearly.


3    Generally comprehensible. The language used is sometimes inadequate to make the process totally clear.
2    Somewhat incomprehensible. The process could only be understood by a sympathetic native listener due to inappropriate language.
1    Incomprehensible.

FLUENCY

4    The student speaks very clearly without hesitation. Pronunciation and intonation sound natural.


3    The student speaks with some hesitation. Problems with pronunciation and intonation do not prevent communication.
2    The student hesitates frequently. Problems with pronunciation and intonation distort meaning and inhibit communication in some instances.
1    Frequent hesitations and extreme problems with pronunciation cause communication to break down.

ACCURACY

4    Functions, grammar, and vocabulary are used correctly.


3    Minor problems in usage do not distort meaning or inhibit communication.
2    Problems in usage significantly distort meaning and inhibit communication in some instances.
1    Problems in usage completely distort meaning and inhibit communication.

EFFORT

4    Exceeds the minimum requirement of the assignment and provides evidence of thoughtful input. Actively demonstrates the process.


3    Fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment and provides evidence of thoughtful input.
2    Fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment but does not show evidence of thoughtful input.
1    Does not fulfill the minimum requirements of the assignment.
   

TOTAL POINTS:      /20

18-20 Excellent


16-17 Good
14-15 Satisfactory
< 13 Unsatisfactory

Teacher comments: _________________________________________________________________



  1. SELF ASSESSMENT



SELF-REFLECTION OF PERFORMANCE ON A PROJECT

Date: ________________________________

TASK: ________________________________

Please explain, in detail, the assignment/task/project. What is it? ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What was something (spelling, appropriate verb endings, sentence variety, etc) from a previous assignment that you wanted to improve (see question 4 on your previous work folder entry)? Did you successfully do so and how? (Please provide a concrete example from your work that illustrates the improvement). ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What did you do well on this task? Again, be specific (e.g., I made good use of previously learned and current vocabulary; I had no spelling errors; I had no mistakes with grammar (specify grammar according to current project—e.g., I always had correct verb endings)). ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________What might you do differently next time to make it even better? Again, be specific (e.g., I will spend more time reviewing and proofreading to avoid careless spelling errors). ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Other comments. How does this project relate to a real world application (e.g., how do you foresee using what you learned on this project later in your travels or life experiences?)? What did you like or dislike about this project?

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



  1. NEW JERSEY CORE CURRICULUM CONTENT STANDARDS FOR WORLD LANGUAGES




New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standard

for

World Languages
INTRODUCTION
World Languages Education in the 21st Century
New Jersey citizens are part of a dynamic, interconnected, and technologically driven global society centered on the creation and communication of knowledge and ideas across geographical, cultural, and linguistic borders. Individuals who effectively communicate in more than one language, with an appropriate understanding of cultural contexts, are globally literate and possess the attributes reflected in the mission and vision for world languages education that follow:
Mission: The study of another language and culture enables individuals, whether functioning as citizens or workers, to communicate face-to-face and by virtual means in appropriate ways with people from diverse cultures.
Vision: An education in world languages fosters a population that:


  • Communicates in more than one language with the levels of language proficiency that are required to function in a variety of occupations and careers in the contemporary workplace.

  • Exhibits attitudes, values, and skills that indicate a positive disposition and understanding of cultural differences and that enhance cross-cultural communication.

  • Values language learning as a global literacy as well as for its long-term worth in fostering personal, work-related, and/or financial success in our increasingly interconnected world.


Intent and Spirit of the World Languages Standard
The study of world languages is spiraling and recursive and aligned to appropriate proficiency targets that ultimately enable the attainment of proficiency at the Novice-High level or above, which is a requirement for high school graduation. All students have regular, sequential instruction in one or more world languages beginning in preschool or kindergarten and continuing at least through the freshman year of high school. Further, N.J.A.C. 6A:8-5.1(b)4 directs districts to actively encourage all students who otherwise meet the current-year requirements for high school graduation to accrue, during each year of enrollment, five credits in world languages aimed at preparation for entrance into postsecondary programs or 21st-century careers. Opportunities to develop higher levels of proficiency should be based on personal and career interests and should be encouraged in Personalized Student Learning Plans.
The number of years spent studying a language and the frequency of instruction impact the level of proficiency acquired in the language. This principle has historically been supported by research in the United States and abroad. However, as part of a three-year grant project (2005-08), the New Jersey Department of Education collected data from New Jersey schools that further support these research findings. Data from the federally funded project that assessed the language proficiency of 60,000 8th-grade students present compelling evidence for the need to develop programs that offer all students the opportunity to meet the state-designated proficiency level of Novice-High. The data show that programs offering a minimum of 540 hours of articulated instruction in classes that meet at least three times a week throughout the academic year produce a majority of students who can speak at the Novice-High proficiency level or higher. Consequently, the establishment and/or maintenance of quality, well articulated language programs at the elementary and middle-school levels, as required by New Jersey Administrative Code, is critical for building the capacity of high school students to achieve the Novice-High level of language proficiency required for graduation.
Language Proficiency Levels
Unlike other New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards areas, the world languages standard is benchmarked by proficiency levels, rather than grade levels. The development of these proficiency levels was informed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners (ACTFL, 1998), the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines—Speaking (ACTFL, 1999), and the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines—Writing (ACTFL, 2001). The levels are fully defined in the World Languages Performance Level Descriptors Table and are summarily reflected in the following proficiency statements:


  • Novice-Mid Level: Students communicate using memorized words and phrases to talk about familiar topics related to school, home, and the community.

  • Novice-High Level: Students communicate using words, lists, and simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.

  • Intermediate-Low Level: Students communicate using simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.

  • Intermediate-Mid Level: Students communicate using strings of sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.

  • Intermediate-High Level: Students communicate using connected sentences and paragraphs to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.

  • Advanced-Low Level: Students communicate using paragraph-level discourse to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.


Realistic Grade-Level Targets for Benchmarked Proficiency Levels
Language learners can be expected to move through levels of proficiency at different rates. In addition, language learners may demonstrate differing proficiencies depending upon the communicative mode in which they are functioning (interpersonal, interpretive, or presentational). However, according to ACTFL, the proficiency levels generally align with grade-level achievement as follows:


  • Novice-Mid Level: Students beginning the study of a second language in preschool or kindergarten in a program that meets a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Novice-Mid level by the end of grade 2.

  • Novice-High Level: Students beginning the study of a second language in preschool or kindergarten in a program that meets a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes, and continuing the study of that language in subsequent grades in a program that meets for the same amount of time, should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Novice-High level by the end of grade 5.

  • Intermediate-Low Level: Students beginning the study of a second language in a program that meets a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes during elementary school, and continuing the study of that language through middle school in a program that meets a minimum of five times a week for 40 minutes, should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Intermediate-Low level by the end of grade 8.

  • Intermediate-Mid Level: Students beginning the study of a second language in a program that meets a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes during elementary school and a minimum of five times a week for 40 minutes during middle school and high school, should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Intermediate-Mid level by the end of grade 10.

  • Intermediate-High Level: Students beginning the study of a second language in a program that meets a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes during elementary school and a minimum of five times a week for 40 minutes during middle school and high school, should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Intermediate-High level by the end of grade 12.

  • Advanced-Low Level: Heritage students and students who have significant experiences with the language outside of the classroom should meet the cumulative progress indicators for the Advanced-Low level by the end of grade 12.


A Note About Preschool Learners: Like other young learners, preschool students learn world languages with the goal of reaching the Novice-Mid level by second grade. However, the focus of language learning for preschool students may differ from the focus of language learning for students in grades K-2. To learn more about language learning at the preschool level, see the Preschool Teaching & Learning Standards.
ACTFL Anticipated Performance Outcomes
The graphic that follows provides a visual representation of anticipated student performance outcomes (ACTFL, 1998).
Visual Representation of Anticipated Performance Outcomes as described in the

ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners


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