Swat’s for november 12, 2014 united states history II honors the great trials mr. Peterson great trials



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SWAT’S FOR NOVEMBER 12, 2014

GREAT TRIALS

  • PERIOD #2 SECTION #2 GREAT TRIALS
  • SWAT:
  • After having completed a graphic organizer in which students describe the causes of the Boston Massacre, the students will be able to explain the events leading up to this event by reading “The Colonists Views on Taxation” by writing about at least three causes with ninety percent accuracy.
  • NJCCCS: 6.1.12.C.2.a: Analyze the problems of financing the American Revolutionary War and dealing with wartime inflation and profiteering.                                               
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

GREAT TRIALS

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  •   What role did Massachusetts and the various leaders from Massachusetts play during the American Revolutionary War?

GREAT TRIALS

  • DO-NOW:
  • Students will be shown a picture of the Boston Massacre. Working individually and in small groups, students will discuss what the image of the picture conjures up in their mind.
  •  A student facilitator will lead a brief discussion.

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • HOMEWORK:
  • Students will answer the following questions for homework:
  • According to the Declaration, how did the colonists compare to the King’s subjects born in Great Britain?
  • Who, according to the Declaration, were the only representatives of the people in the colonies?
  • Which famous slogan used by the colonists in their struggle with Great Britain best sums up the Declaration?

GREAT TRIALS

  • REVIEW/LESSON CONNECTIONS:
  • The teacher will review the importance of the Trial of Socrates and the Amistad
  • Movement.

GREAT TRIALS

  • EXPLANATION
  • The teacher will discuss the events leading up to the Boston Massacre utilizing a power point presentation. The teacher will instruct the students to take notes from the power point entitled: “Boston Massacre use with lesson plans of November 12, 2014”

GREAT TRIALS

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Utilizing a graphic organizer, the teacher will assist the students in describing the causes of the Boston Massacre from having presented a power point to the students.
  • A student facilitator will be appointed to aid with this process. A Smart Board graphic organizer will be utilized.
  • As students are working with their partners, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus, an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  • In addition, the teacher will check in with students to ensure their understanding. Thus a (Student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • APPLICATION:
  • Students will take turns continuing to fill out their graphic organizers on the other causes of the Boston Massacre.
  • Students will begin reading out loud: “The Colonists Views on Taxation.” While students are reading out loud, the teacher will instruct the students to take notes based on their reading.
  • Utilizing a graphic organizer, students will be instructed to explain the main ideas of the document.
  • The teacher will ask students to signal their understanding of what they are to do by a “thumbs-up, thumbs-down.” Thus a (Thumbs-up; thumbs-down) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  • As students are working individually, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus, an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  • In addition, the teacher will check in with students to ensure their understanding. Thus a (Student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  • Using a (One paragraph formative assessment), the students will write and explain at least three of the causes of the Boston Massacre after having started reading “The Colonists Views on Taxation.”

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will assist students in listing and describing the major causes of the Boston Massacre.

GREAT TRIALS

  • PERIOD #2 SECTION #2 GREAT TRIALS
  • ALTERNATIVE SWAT:
  • After having completed a quarterly assessment, the students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the court system and its practices as well as the importance of the “Great Trials” of both Socrates and the “Amistad” incident by reviewing their quarterly assessment in class writing and analyzing at least three major areas which they can improve upon.

GREAT TRIALS

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • Did the Amistad incident put slavery on trial?
  • How did the Amistad trial foreshadow the future conflicts over slavery?
  • Is the trial process a fair one that protects the defendant and the people?
  • What if any modifications should be made in the trial process to make it fairer or more equitable?
  •  

GREAT TRIALS

  • DO-NOW:
  • Quarterly assessments returned to students.
  • Student led.

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • HOMEWORK:
  • No assigned homework.

GREAT TRIALS

  • REVIEW/LESSON CONNECTIONS:
  • Teacher will remind students of the major points to consider when taking a quarterly assessment.

GREAT TRIALS

  • EXPLANATION
  • I present new material and make learning relevant?)
  • Teacher will remind students of the directions for the quarterly assessment.
  •  Teacher will remind students of the various strategies which need to be taken into account in working through this kind of assessment.
  •  Teacher will go over the quarterly assessment.

GREAT TRIALS

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Working in small groups, students will turn to their partner and discuss ways by which they could have written their essays in a more insightful and analytical way. Thus, a (turn-to-your-partner) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  
  • As students are working with their partners, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus, an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  
  • In addition, the teacher will check in with students to ensure their understanding. Thus a (Student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • APPLICATION:
  • Students will begin to work on the review sheet by pre-writing their essay response.

THE GREAT TRIALS

  • APPLICATION:
  • While the students are pre-writing their essay, the teacher will walk around and observe. Thus, an (Observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  • In addition, the teacher will engage in a one on one conversation as needed with students to check for their understanding. Thus a (Student Conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

GREAT TRIALS

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • Teacher will ask the student the following question: List one major point which remains unclear to them.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • PERIOD #1, Section #1
  • SWAT: After completing research in which students engaged in reading both primary and secondary sources, the students will be able to analyze the reasons for dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by participating in a debate on the decision to drop the atomic bomb writing and describing at least three reasons either in favor or against with an essay rubric score of 50/54.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • NJCCCS:
  • NJCCCS: 6.1.12.A.11.d : Analyze the decision to use the atomic bomb and the consequences of doing so.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • Common Core:
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • What is America’s place in the world?

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • DO-NOW:
  • What is America’s place in the world? What should America’s place be?
  • A student facilitator will lead a brief discussion.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • Homework:
  • Students will write a reflective essay on their experiences both as active members of the debate team as well as by being observers reflecting on the strengths and areas of improvement needed in the debate.
  • Students will prepare for a quiz on the material learned thus far from the debate and from information gathered from the information acquired in this unit on America’s decision to drop the atomic bomb.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • REVIEW OF PREVIOUSLY LEARNED MATERIAL/LESSON CONNECTIONS:
  • Review the kinds of tactics which had been used by countries to win a war up to the point of 1945.
  •  The teacher will ask students to write about at least three tactics/strategies used by countries to win a war up to the point of 1945. A (Quick Write) formative assessment will be utilized for this purpose.
  •  While students are completed task, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus an (Observation) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  •  Upon completion, the teacher will select a few students to share their (quick write) with the class.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • EXPLANATION:
  • Teacher will review the project grading rubric and expectations which was developed collaboratively with the students.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Students will get into their groups to make final preparations for the debate on the decision to drop the atomic bomb.
  • The teacher will be sure the students understand the task before them. The teacher will have the students signal with a thumbs-up; thumbs-down. Thus a (Thumbs-up; thumbs-down) formative assessment will be utilized.
  • The teacher will walk around the classroom as the students are completing their finishing touches on the debate. Thus a (Classroom observation) formative assessment will be utilized.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • APPLICATION:
  • The students will participate in a debate on the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. The students will be divided up into two teams. Teams previously assigned.
  • Resolution Statement:
  • Resolved: The decision to drop the atomic bomb was justifiable on the part of the United States government in order to bring an end to World War II.
  • Parts include:
  • Opening and Closing statements
  • Political
  • Ethical
  • Economic
  • Social
  • Technological.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • APPLICATION:
  • Resolution Statement:
  • Resolved: The decision to drop the atomic bomb was justifiable on the part of the United States government in order to bring an end to World War II.
  • Students will be allowed one index card with notes on it and a blank sheet of paper so that they can take notes based on what is said by other members of the class relative to the debate.
  • In addition, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe the students at work. Thus an (Observation) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  • Utilizing an (exit card) formative assessment, the students will write and describe at least three reasons either in favor or against the dropping of the atomic bomb in preparation for writing an essay response on this topic

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will assist students in identifying and describing the major arguments for both dropping the atomic bomb and for not dropping the atomic bomb.
  • The teacher will assist students in describing the various issues which Truman faced when Japan initially refused to surrender in August of 1945.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • PERIOD #1, Section #1&2
  • SWAT: Given a quarterly assessment, the students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of events occurring from the early twentieth century starting with the rise in totalitarianism in Europe after World War I to the beginning of the Cold War era by scoring at least an 80% on the formative assessment.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • NJCCCS:
  • 6.1.12.A.11.d : Analyze the decision to use the atomic bomb and the consequences of doing so.
  • 6.1.12.D.11.a.:Analyze the roles of various alliances among nations and their leaders in the conduct and outcomes of the World War II.                                                                         
  • 6.1.12.A.11.b : Compare and contrast different perspectives about how the United States should respond to aggressive policies and actions taken by other nations at this time.       

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • Common Core:
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • What is America’s place in the world?
  • How might World War II have changed life from 1940 to 1945?
  • Is American foreign policy motivated more by ideals or self-interest?
  • How does involvement in the world shape American society at home?
  • What is the proper relationship between the people and the government?
  • What does it mean to be American?
  • Is there a higher standard than the law of nations?
  • How did the Cold War change American society?

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • DO-NOW:
  • Students will quickly look over their notes prior to completing the quarterly assessment.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • Homework:
  • Students should continue studying for their first quarterly assessment.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • REVIEW OF PREVIOUSLY LEARNED MATERIAL/LESSON CONNECTIONS:
  • WW2

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • EXPLANATION:
  • Teacher will explain the directions for the quarterly assessment.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • APPLICATION:
  • Students will complete quarterly assessment.

AMERICAN HISTORY II HONORS

  • SYNTHESIS:

AP US HISTORY

  • Swat: After having completed a quarterly assessment, the students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of events occurring in North America during the pre-colonial period leading to a Revolution and the establishment of a Republican culture by reviewing their quarterly assessment in class writing and analyzing at least three major areas which they can improve upon.
  •  

AP US HISTORY

  • NJCCCS: 6.1.12.A.2.b.: Evaluate the importance of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights to the spread of democracy around the world.                                                                               
  • RH. 9-10.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
  • RH.9-10.1; Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

AP US HISTORY

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • How did democratic and republican values and competing conceptions of national identity affect the development and success of the Articles of Confederation?

AP US HISTORY

  • HOMEWORK: The students will continue to review for their quarterly assessment.

AP US HISTORY

  • DO-NOW
  • : Quarterly assessments returned to students.

AP US HISTORY

  • REVIEW OF PREVIOUS LEARNED MATERIAL/LESSON CONNECTIONS:
  • Teacher will remind students of the major points to consider when taking a quarterly assessment.

AP US HISTORY

  • EXPLANATION:
  • Teacher will remind students of the directions for the quarterly assessment.
  • Teacher will remind students of the various strategies which need to be taken into account in working through this kind of assessment.
  • Teacher will go over the quarterly assessment.

AP US HISTORY

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Working in small groups, students will turn to their partner and discuss ways by which they could have written their DBQ responses and essays in a more insightful and analytical way. Thus, a (turn-to-your-partner) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  
  • As students are working with their partners, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus, an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  
  • In addition, the teacher will check in with students to ensure their understanding. Thus a (Student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION;
  • Students will work on correcting their quarterly assessment and refining their DBQ responses as well as their essay responses.
  •  
  • As students are working individually, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus, an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  
  • In addition, the teacher will check in with students to ensure their understanding. Thus a (Student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

AP US HISTORY

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The muddiest close will be utilized. The teacher will ask the students if there are any points which remain unclear to them.

AP US HISTORY

  •  SWAT: Given a document prompt from Paine’s work, The American Crisis, the students will be able to analyze why the patriots won the Revolution by working in groups reading and writing a summary describing at least three reasons for the patriot victory examining the environmental, military, political, diplomatic and ideological reasons for the patriot victory with 80% accuracy.
  •  

AP US HISTORY

  • NJCCCS: 6.1.12.A.2.b.: Evaluate the importance of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights to the spread of democracy around the world.                                                                                
  • RH. 9-10.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
  •  RH.9-10.1; Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

AP US HISTORY

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  •  How did democratic and republican ideals and emerging conceptions of American identity lead to the Declaration of Independence and the development of American institutions?
  • What was the immediate and long-term significance of the Declaration of Independence?
  • How did the Declaration of Independence shape belief systems and independence movements?
  • Why did the rebels win the war for independence?

AP US HISTORY

  • HOMEWORK: The students will listen to a flipped classroom lecture on Chapter #6: Making war and Republican Governments.” While reading as well as listening to the flipped classroom lecture, students should take notes.

AP US HISTORY

  • DO-NOW:
  • Under what conditions are revolutions staged and what factors determine the outcome of revolutions?
  •  Student Led.

AP US HISTORY

  • REVIEW OF PREVIOUS LEARNED MATERIAL/LESSON CONNECTIONS
  • The teacher will review information previously acquired on the factors which contributed to the Declaration of Independence and the causes which led the colonists to rebel.
  •  The teacher will have the students complete a quick write in which students write about at least three of causes which led the colonists to rebel. A (Quick Write) formative assessment will be utilized for this purpose.

AP US HISTORY

  • EXPLANATION:
  • Teacher will review the flipped classroom lecture on Chapter #6: Making War and Republican Governments.

AP US HISTORY

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Working collaboratively, the teacher will guide the students in creating a graphic organizer in which the students describe the political, social and economic changes the American Revolution produced and what stayed the same.
  •  Two students will be appointed to lead this section of the class. One student will lead a class wide discussion asking questions of the students and encouraging their peers to ask questions and posit answers.
  •  A second student will write down the responses on a suitable Smart Board graphic organizer.

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION;
  • Working individually, students will read a document prompt from The Crisis by Thomas Paine.
  •  www.ushistory.org/paine/crisis/singlehtml.htm
  •  Students will answer the following questions:
  •  What is Paine talking about in the excerpt?
  • To what degree is Paine building a convincing argument? How do you know?
  • What is Paine’s argument?

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION:
  • While the students are engaged in this activity, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus an (observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  Additionally, the teacher will engage students in a one on one conversation to check for understanding. Thus, a (student conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  •  After about fifteen minutes engaged in this activity, two students will be appointed to lead a class wide discussion. One student will facilitate the discussion among the class while the other will write down information on a suitable Smart Board graphic organizer designed for this purpose.

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION:
  •  Again, while the students are working, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe. Thus an (Observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  Utilizing an (Exit card) formative assessment, the students will be able to describe at least three reasons for the patriot victory examining the environmental, military, political, diplomatic and ideological reasons for the patriot victory. 

AP US HISTORY

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will assist the students in analyzing why the patriots won the Revolution.

AP US HISTORY

  • SECOND SWAT:
  • After taking notes on a brief lecture on the global impact of the Declaration of Independence, the students will be able to analyze one of the various declaration of independence produced by U.S. states (eg: Texas and South Carolina) or other countries (e.g.: Venezuela, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and Liberia) by comparing the United States Declaration of Independence to at least one of the various other declarations examined on-line writing and explaining at least three major similarities or differences between the documents with at least 80% accuracy.
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • What was the immediate and long term significance of the Declaration of Independence?
  • How did republican and democratic ideals and emerging conceptions of American identity lead to the Declaration of Independence and the development of American political institutions?

AP US HISTORY

  •  APPLICATION:
  • Working individually, and then in small groups, the students will be able to analyze one of the various declaration of independence produced by U.S. states (eg: Texas and South Carolina) or other countries (e.g.: Venezuela, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and Liberia) by comparing the United States Declaration of Independence
  •  While the students are working, the teacher will circulate the classroom. Thus a (Classroom Observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  In addition, the teacher will engage in a one on one discussion to be sure that students understand what they are to do. Thus a (Student Conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  •  Utilizing a (One paragraph) formative assessment, students will write and explain at least three major similarities or differences between the document selected and the Declaration of Independence. 

AP US HISTORY

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will reinforce the lesson and its objectives reminding students of the importance and rationale for writing the Declaration of Independence.

AP US HISTORY

  •  SWAT: After completing a graphic organizer, the students will be able to read a small excerpt and to formulate an introductory paragraph from the thesis based on a historical excerpt by writing and analyzing at least three major factors which need to be taken into account when writing an introductory paragraph with 80% accuracy.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

AP US HISTORY

  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • In what way is it important for an introductory paragraph to be in alignment with the thesis statement?
  •  How is the introductory paragraph an integral part of the essay?

AP US HISTORY

  • HOMEWORK: Students will begin to study for their test on Chapters 4 and 5.

AP US HISTORY

  • DO-NOW:
  • Working in small groups, students will list the factors which need to be taken into account when developing an introductory paragraph.
  •  Student led.

AP US HISTORY

  • REVIEW OF PREVIOUS LEARNED MATERIAL/LESSON CONNECTIONS
  • Review the writing of the thesis statement.
  • Review the You Tube video clip on writing of a thesis statement
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HePQWodWiQ

AP US HISTORY

  • EXPLANATION:
  • Teacher will present a You Tube video clip on how to develop an introductory paragraph. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clPtbFT23Bs
  •  Teacher will present a second You Tube video clip on how to develop an introductory paragraph.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgCujqVW-8E&feature=related

AP US HISTORY

  • GUIDED PRACTICE:
  • Using a graphic organizer, teacher will assist students in listing the major points which need to be considered when developing an introductory paragraph. Smart Board technology will be utilized for this purpose.
  •  Two students will be appointed to lead this part of the lesson. One student will facilitate a class wide discussion in which students share out their ideas listing the major points which need to be considered when developing an introductory paragraph.
  •  A second student will write down the notes and ideas generated by students on a suitable Smart Board graphic organizer.
  •  While the two students are facilitated class, the remaining students will set up a similar graphic organizer in their notebook.
  •  The teacher will walk around the classroom as the students are taking notes. Thus a (Classroom observation) formative assessment will be utilized.

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION;
  • Working individually, students will be given a topic. Next, students will practice writing introductory paragraphs starting with the hook or topic sentence and funneling out to the thesis statement.
  •  Anchor chart to be created.
  •  While the students are practicing writing their introductory paragraphs, the teacher will walk around the classroom and observe the students. Thus a (Classroom observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  • In addition, the teacher will engage students in a one on one conversation to ensure their understanding of the lesson. Thus a (Student Conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.

AP US HISTORY

  • APPLICATION:
  • Utilizing an (exit card) formative assessment, the students will analyze the three major parts to the Introductory paragraph
  • Grab Reader’s attention
  • Narrow reader’s focus
  • Thesis statement
  •  Students will describe how the “funnel” approach enables the writer to address each of the three major parts of the Introductory paragraph.

AP US HISTORY

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will assist students in a further understanding of the important role an introductory paragraph plays to the overall development of an essay.

AP US HISTORY

  • SECOND SWAT:
  • After taking notes on a brief lecture on the global impact of the Declaration of Independence, the students will be able to analyze one of the various declaration of independence produced by U.S. states (eg: Texas and South Carolina) or other countries (e.g.: Venezuela, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and Liberia) by comparing the United States Declaration of Independence to at least one of the various other declarations examined on-line writing and explaining at least three major similarities or differences between the documents with at least 80% accuracy.
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
  • What was the immediate and long term significance of the Declaration of Independence?
  • How did republican and democratic ideals and emerging conceptions of American identity lead to the Declaration of Independence and the development of American political institutions?

AP US HISTORY

  •  APPLICATION:
  • Working individually, and then in small groups, the students will be able to analyze one of the various declaration of independence produced by U.S. states (eg: Texas and South Carolina) or other countries (e.g.: Venezuela, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and Liberia) by comparing the United States Declaration of Independence
  •  While the students are working, the teacher will circulate the classroom. Thus a (Classroom Observation) formative assessment will be utilized.
  •  In addition, the teacher will engage in a one on one discussion to be sure that students understand what they are to do. Thus a (Student Conference) formative assessment will also be utilized.
  •  Utilizing a (One paragraph) formative assessment, students will write and explain at least three major similarities or differences between the document selected and the Declaration of Independence. 

AP US HISTORY

  • SYNTHESIS:
  • The teacher will reinforce the lesson and its objectives reminding students of the importance and rationale for writing the Declaration of Independence.

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