Style Analysis Essays



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Style Analysis Essays
Style Analysis Essays are six to seven paragraph responses to the author’s style and rhetorical strategies in a short piece of literature – usually nonfiction. In this packet, students will learn to write about tone, diction, detail, point of view, organization and syntax at an advanced level. The Style Analysis Essay is one-third of the AP Language Essay Score. Therefore, every student must have these skills

mastered by the beginning of February.


Student Name
_________________________________
Period
_______




Table of Contents


Lessons

Page number

Check when completed

Literary Terms to Know

3




Style Analysis Outline: The Chart Version

4-6




Tone and Attitude


7




“The Rattler”


8-9




Writing a Thesis


10




Writing an Introduction



11




Writing a Diction Paragraph


12-14




Writing a Detail Paragraph


15-17




Writing a Point of View Paragraph

18-20




Writing an Organization Paragraph

21-23




Writing a Syntax Paragraph


24-26




Writing a Conclusion


27





Literary Terms to Know

Literary terms can be confusing because there are many names that may mean the same thing. This chart will help you understand what the prompt is asking and give you vocabulary to use in your essay




Literary Term – Please define

Words that mean the same or can be used in conjunction with the term.

Style Analysis

Author’s use of style

Author’s use of language

Author’s use of rhetorical strategies


Tone



Mood, Attitude

Diction



Word Choice, Language,

Figurative Language,

Figures of Speech


Detail



Imagery

Point of View



Narrator, Perspective


Organization


Narrative Structure: chronological order, cause and effect, order of importance, flash-forward, flashback, problem-solution

Syntax



Sentence Structure

Please Note: diction, detail, point of view, organization and syntax are all devices that the author uses to make the tone of the story evident to the reader. Your commentary should consistently link your evidence to the tone of the story.




Literary Analysis Outline:

The Chart Version
Paragraph 1: Tone

Sentence 1

Introduces the author and title and names two different but complimentary tones.

Sentences 2-4

Elaborate on the ideas written in your thesis. Include information about the plot, conflict and historical background if possible.



Paragraph 2: Diction

Sentence 1

Topic Sentence: It includes the word diction and links it to the tone words.

Sentence 2

Evidence: This sentence will use 3 words or short phrases from different parts of the beginning of the passage that have strong connotations – they will be good examples to support the tone words in your thesis and topic sentence.

Sentence 3

Explain the significance of one or two of the words you quoted.

Sentence 4

Explain the significance of the other word or words you quoted.

Sentence 5

Evidence: This sentence will use 2 or 3 words or short phrases from different parts of the end of the passage that have strong connotations – they will be good examples to support the tone words in your thesis and topic sentence.

Sentence 6

Explain the significance of one or two of the words you quoted.

Sentence 7

Explain the significance of the other word or words you quoted.

Sentence 8

This concluding sentence ties the ideas together and leads into the detail paragraph.


Paragraph 3: Detail

Sentence 1

Topic Sentence: It includes the word detail or imagery and links it to the tone words.

Sentence 2

Evidence: This sentence will use 2 phrases from early in the passage that describes the sensory details – sight, taste, touch, smell, and sound.

Sentence 3

Explain the significance of one of the phrases you quoted.

Sentence 4

Explain the significance of the other phrase you quoted.

Sentence 5

Evidence: This sentence will use 2 phrases from early in the passage that describes the sensory details – sight, taste, touch, smell, and sound.

Sentence 6

Explain the significance of one of the phrases you quoted.

Sentence 7

Explain the significance of the other phrase you quoted.

Sentence 8

This concluding sentence ties the ideas together and leads into the point of view paragraph.


Paragraph 4: Point of View

Sentence 1

Topic Sentence: It includes the words first person, third person limited, or third person omniscient point of view and links it to the tone words.

Sentence 2

Evidence: This sentence will use 1 or 2 phrases that explain the narrator’s perspective from the beginning of the passage.

Sentence 3

Explain the significance of one of the phrases you quoted.

Sentence 4

Explain the significance of the other phrase you quoted.

Sentence 5

Evidence: This sentence will use 1 or 2 phrases that explain the narrator’s perspective toward the end of the passage.

Sentence 6

Explain the significance of one of the phrases you quoted.

Sentence 7

Explain the significance of the other phrase you quoted.

Sentence 8

This concluding sentence ties the ideas together and explains how the point of view or perspective either remained constant or changed.


Paragraph 5: Organization

Sentence 1

Topic Sentence: The sentence includes the word organization and defines it (chronological, flash-back, flash-forward, cause and effect etc.)

Sentence 2

Evidence: Summarize the beginning of the story/essay.

Sentence 3

Explain why the author began the story here.

Sentence 4

Evidence: Summarize the middle of the story/essay.

Sentence 5

Explain why the author used this as the turning point or climax.

Sentence 6

Evidence: Summarize the end of the story/essay.

Sentence 7

Explain why the author ended with this event/idea.

Sentence 8

This concluding sentence discusses the flow of the entire piece.


Paragraph 6: Syntax

Sentence 1

Topic Sentence: The sentence includes the word syntax and relates it to the tone.

Sentence 2

Evidence: Cite the type of sentences the author is using - simple, complex, commands, fragments, dialogue, repetition, colloquialism, slang, etc.

Sentence 3

Explain why the author uses this style of grammar.

Sentence 4

Discuss the placement of this punctuation and link it to the tone.

Sentence 5

Evidence: Cite the type of punctuation the author is using – dashes, capital letters, question marks, exclamation points, colons, semi-colons.

Sentence 6

Explain why the author uses this type of punctuation.

Sentence 7

Discuss the placement of this punctuation and link it to the tone.

Sentence 8

This concluding sentence discusses the flow of the entire piece.



Paragraph 7: Conclusion

Sentence 1

Connect the tones in the story to the theme or main idea.

Sentences 2-4

Explain why the theme is important to readers.

Tone and Attitude




  1. What does the word “tone” mean? Please define it in your own words.

___________________________________________________

  1. What does the phrase “tone of voice” mean? Please define it in your own words.

___________________________________________________________

  1. List six words that could describe a person’s tone of voice.

__________________ __________________ __________________

__________________ __________________ __________________


Look at the example below, and highlight or underline the words or phrases that tell how Jeff feels.
Jeff clenched his fists tightly and closed eyes. Nevertheless, his face turned red as his enemy strutted by him.
4. Choose one of the words from question three, and write two to three sentences that convey that tone without using the tone word or any synonym of the tone word.

Tone: ___________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Highlight or underline the words that convey the feeling you chose.
Common Tone Words (in adjective form)


sad

angry

humble

cheerful

didactic

depressed

mocking

gentle

enthusiastic

astute

gloomy

out-raged

passive

admiring

diplomatic

melancholy

vindictive

accepting

playful

persuasive

disheartened

frustrated

earnest

joyous

intense

sulking

critical

sincere

whimsical

cautionary

solemn

aggravated

apathetic

benevolent

loving

mournful

aggressive

reflective

surprised

sympathetic



Read the following story and circle the words that suggest tone. You will use this story to write your style analysis essay.

The Rattler

After sunset… I walked out into the desert… Light was thinning; the bushes’ dry savory odors were sweet on the cooler air. In this, the first pleasant moment for a walk after long blazing hot hours at work, I thought I was the only one here.

Abruptly, I stopped short.

The other lay rigid, as he suddenly arrested. His body undulant – moving in a wave-like motion. His head was not drawn back to strike – yet. It was merely turned a little to watch what I would do. It was a rattlesnake – and knew it. I mean when a six foot black snake thick as my wrist, capable of a long range attack, and armed with powerful fangs is in the middle of a path, he did not feel the need to get out of anybody’s way. He held his ground in calm watchfulness; he was not even rattling-yet, much less was he coiled. He was waiting for me to show my intentions.

My first instinct was to let him go his way and I would go mine, and with this he would have been well content. I have never killed an animal that I was not obliged to kill; the sport in taking life is a satisfaction I can’t feel. But I reflected that there were children, dogs, horses at the ranch as well as men and women who were not very strong. My duty, plainly, was to kill the snake. I went back to the ranch house, got a hoe, and returned.

The rattler had not moved; he lay there like a live wire. But he saw the hoe. Now his tail twitched – the little tocsin sounded; he drew his head back as if to attack, so I raised my weapon. Quicker than I could strike, he shot into a dense bush and set up his rattling. He shook and shook his fair but furious signal, quite sportingly warning me that I had made an unprovoked attack, attempted to take his life, and that if I persisted he would have no choice but to take mine if he could. I listened for a minute to his little song of death. It was not ugly though it was ominous. It said that life was dear and would be dearly sold. And I reached into the bush with my hoe and, hacking about, soon dragged him out of it with his back broken.

He struck passionately one more time at the hoe; but a moment later his neck was broken, and he was soon dead. Technically, that is; he was still twitching and when I picked him up by the tail, some consequent jar, some mechanical reflex made his jaw gape and snap once more. There was blood in his mouth and poison dripping from his fangs; it was a nasty sight, pitiful now that it was done.



I did not cut off the rattles for a trophy; I let him drop into the close green guardianship of the bush. Then, for a moment, I could see him as if I had let him go, sinuous and self respecting over the desert sand.
Analyzing The Rattler


  1. How does the man feel about what he does?


  1. What impression does the snake give?


  1. Frequently, students say that they feel sorry for the snake or that the snake seems to be full of power and dignity. Please list six tone words that could be used to describe the feelings in this story.


__________________________ ___________________________

__________________________ ___________________________

__________________________ ___________________________



The Thesis


  1. Do not copy the prompt.

  2. The thesis is the first sentence in your introduction. It will include the title of the piece, the author (if the name is give), and two different but complimentary tones.

Example using tones in adjective form:



In “The Rattler,” the remorseful and duty bound tones reflect the man’s reluctance to kill the snake, but his willingness to protect others.
Fill in the blanks by using two tone words you listed on the previous page, and then finish the sentence.
In “The Rattler”, the __________________ and ___________________ tones reflect the _______________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________


Example using tones in noun form (leave out the word “tone”):

In “The Rattler,” the remorse and responsibility reflect the man’s reluctance to kill the snake, but his willingness to protect others.
Fill in the blanks by using two tone words that are nouns, and then finish the sentence.
In “The Rattler”, the __________________ and ___________________ reflect the _____________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________





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