Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life



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Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life

  • On Course
  • Chapter 6
  • GAINING SELF-AWARENESS

CASE STUDY IN CRITICAL THINKING STRANGE CHOICES

  • Choose the student you think made the strangest choice and speculate why she or he made this choice. In particular, what are the kinds of past experiences that may have made the student behave this way?
  • Recall a course you once took in which you made a choice that your instructor might describe as “strange.” Explain why you made that choice. Dive deep, exploring what really caused your choice.

CRITICAL THINKING: FOCUS QUESTIONS RECOGNIZING WHEN YOU ARE OFF COURSE

  • In which of your life roles are you off course?
  • Do you know how you got there?
  • More important, do you know how to get back on course to your desired outcomes and experiences?

THE MYSTERY OF SELF-SABOTAGE

    • I started a study group.
    • I started a study group, but I have missed two meetings.
    • I did all my homework early.
    • I did all my homework early, but I left it at home.
  • Wise Choice
  • Self-Sabotaging
  • Wise Choice
  • Self-Sabotaging
  • Identify each statement as a self-sabotaging behavior or as a wise choice behavior.

CRITICAL THINKING: FOCUS QUESTIONS IDENTIFYING YOUR SCRIPTS

  • What habit patterns in your life get you off course?
  • How did these habit patterns develop?

“STICKS AND STONES” ACTIVITY

  • Form groups of 7-8.
  • Your task is to build a structure using only the BBQ skewer’s (sticks) and marshmallow’s (stones) provided.

“STICKS AND STONES” ACTIVITY

    • Think about the activity you just completed and write your responses to the following questions:
    • What thoughts did you have while building the structure?
    • What emotions were you feeling while building the structure?
    • What did you do while building the structure?
    • How successful did you think your group would be?
    • If a stranger walked in the room and looked at your model, what do you think he or she would say?
    • (Save your answers so you can refer back to them later.)

ANATOMY OF A SCRIPT

  • Scripts are internal forces composed of habit patterns and core beliefs. Think about your habit patterns: something you often think, feel, or do.
    • List one of your thought patterns, one of your emotional patterns, or one of your behavioral patterns.
    • Does this habit pattern tend to keep you on course or get you off course?
    • Pair up and share the habit patterns you’ve identified. Brainstorm strategies to revise a habit pattern that gets you off course or strengthen a habit pattern that keeps you on course.

HABITUAL PATTERNS

    • I am good in math.
    • I am always late to class.
    • I'm too busy.
    • I often feel anxious.
    • I exercise regularly.
    • I always screw up.
    • I seldom get angry.
    • I never ask for help.
    • My tutor always frustrates me.
  • Thought Pattern
  • Behavioral Pattern
  • Emotional Pattern
  • Decide if the following sentences are thought patterns, emotional patterns or behavioral patterns.

CORE BELIEFS

  • Core beliefs are unconscious judgments that dictate what we consistently think, feel and do. They are an invisible part of a script that contains our view of ourselves, other people and the world.
  • Complete the following sentence stems according to your core beliefs.
    • The world is_________.
    • People are _________.
    • I am ________________.
  • VectorFrenzy

HOW WE WROTE OUR SCRIPTS

  • Think about your answers from the previous slide. What factors have influenced your core beliefs?
    • When you were a child, how did others respond to you?
    • When you were a child, what did significant adults say to you?
    • When you were a child, what behaviors of significant adults did you observe?
    • What other factors may have contributed to your core beliefs?

HOW WE WROTE OUR SCRIPTS

  • Attributions are qualities that tell us “how we are” or “how we should be.” For example, “I’m creative” or “Always be busy.”
    • Write one of your attributions.
    • Injunctions are qualities that tell us “what we are not” or “what we should not be.” For example, “I’m not good in math” or “Don’t stand up for yourself.”
    • Write one of your injunctions.
    • How do you believe you developed your attributions and injunctions?

SCRIPTS

  • Look back at your answers that you wrote for the “stick-n-stones” activity.
  • What thought patterns, emotional patterns or behavioral patterns did your answers reveal?
  • What unconscious beliefs did your answers reveal?
  • What did you learn or relearn about your habit patterns and core beliefs?

SELF-DEFEATING HABIT PATTERNS

  • Look over the list of Self-Defeating Habit Patterns in On Course.
    • Put a check mark next to any of the habits that apply to you.
    • Rewrite the statements that you marked so they are no longer self-defeating habits.
    • Pair up with a classmate
    • Discuss how you will stop a self-defeating habit and/or adopt an empowering new habit.

COAT OF ARMS ACTIVITY

  • A “coat of arms” is a shield with symbols on it to represent certain traits of a person or family.
  • Using the diagram on the next slide, make your own “coat of arms” by following the directives written on the shield.
  • Use only symbols or pictures.
  • Be prepared to share!
  • pio3
  • 3 words which describe you.
  • Something you are good at.
  • Something you are working to improve.
  • Your most prized material possession.
  • Your most prized non-material possession.
  • Your future career.
  • An achievement you are
  • proud of.
  • A contribution you want
  • to make
  • to
  • others.

CRITICAL THINKING: FOCUS QUESTION REWRITING YOUR OUTDATED SCRIPTS

  • How can you revise the self-defeating scripts that keep you from achieving your full potential?
  • Jeff Morin

SELF-AWARENESS AT WORK

  • The Holland Code is a tool that places you in one of six personality types and suggests possible careers that may appeal to you.
  • Review the following career choices. Write down the number next to the career choice that is most appealing to you.
  • Mechanic
  • Chemist
  • Writer
  • Nurse
  • Salesperson
  • Accountant
  • Electrician
  • Detective
  • Musician
  • Counselor
  • Lawyer
  • Secretary
  • Dental technician
  • Doctor
  • Interior decorator
  • Teacher
  • Entrepreneur
  • Financial planner
  • Forester
  • Mathematician
  • Inventor
  • Physical Therapist
  • Travel Agent
  • Computer Operator

SELF-AWARENESS AT WORK

  • Review the following chart. Find the personality type that is most appealing to you and record its number.
  • Personality Type
  • Personality Type Description
  • 1
  • Realistic
  • Prefers activities involving objects, tools and machines.
  • 2
  • Investigative
  • Prefers activities involving abstract problem solving and the exploration of physical, biological, and cultural phenomena for the purpose of understanding and controlling them.
  • 3
  • Artistic
  • Prefers activities involving self-expression, using words, ideas or materials to create art forms or new concepts.
  • 4
  • Social
  • Prefers activities involving interaction with other people to inform, train, develop, help or enlighten them.
  • 5
  • Enterprising
  • Prefers activities involving the persuasion and management of others to attain organizational goals or economic gain.
  • 6
  • Conventional
  • Prefers activities involving the application of data to bring order out of confusion and develop a prescribed plan.

SELF-AWARENESS AT WORK

  • Does the number next to your selected career choice match the number next to your selected personality type description?
    • If so, how could you use this information to benefit you?
    • If not, is there a possible career choice that you have not considered in the past?

CRITICAL THINKING: FOCUS QUESTIONS WRITE YOUR OWN RULES

  • What personal rules do you have that dictate the choices you make daily?
  • Which of these rules help you create high self-esteem?
  • 89studio

THREE SUCCESS RULES

    • Show up: I commit to attending every class from beginning to end.
    • Do their best work: I commit to doing my best work on all assignments, including turning them in on time.
    • Participate actively: I commit to getting involved.
  • What are the three behaviors that successful students consistently do?
  • Lisa F. Young

CHANGING YOUR HABITS

  • Exceptional students follow not only the three basic rules of success; they also create their own rules for college and life.
  • Form groups of four.
  • Discuss additional rules that would help you become more successful in college.
  • Share your rules with the class.

QUICK REVIEW

  • Scripts are internal forces composed of what?
  • Core
  • Beliefs
  • Behavior Patterns
  • Thought Patterns

QUICK REVIEW

  • Decide if the following sentences are thought patterns, emotional patterns, or behavioral patterns.
    • I am such a lousy writer.
    • I always get caught using my cell phone in class.
    • I am always happy.
    • I am typically late for my morning class.
    • I get frustrated in my English class.
    • I will never do well in college.
  • Thought
  • Behavioral
  • Emotional
  • Behavioral
  • Emotional
  • Thought

QUICK REVIEW

  • Prefers activities involving abstract problem solving and the exploration of physical, biological, and cultural phenomena for the purpose of understanding and controlling them.
  • Prefers activities involving self-expression, using words, ideas or materials to create art forms or new concepts.
  • Prefers activities involving interaction with other people to inform, train, develop, help or enlighten them.
  • Prefers activities involving the persuasion and management of others to attain organizational goals or economic gain.
  • Match the following personality type to the correct description.
  • Prefers activities involving objects, tools and machines.
  • Prefers activities involving the application of data to bring order out of confusion and develop a prescribed plan.
  • CONVENTIONAL
  • INVESTIGATIVE
  • ARTISTIC
  • ENTERPRISING
  • SOCIAL
  • REALISTIC

QUICK REVIEW

  • What are the three success rules of successful students?
  • I show
  • up.
  • I participate actively.
  • I do
  • my
  • best work.

Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life

  • On Course
  • Chapter 6

WISE CHOICES IN COLLEGE: TAKING TESTS

  • What are three factors that determine how well you score on a test?
  • Which factor do you believe is the most important and why?
  • How well have you prepared?
  • How well do you take tests?
  • How much have you learned from previous tests?

CHALLENGES WITH TAKING TESTS

  • Make a list of common challenges you have experienced while taking tests in college.
  • Circle the challenge you struggle with the most and look for a strategy in On Course to help you.
  • Report to the group your challenge and the strategy you found to help you.
  • Glen Jones

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS BEFORE TAKING TESTS

  • How could you use the CORE learning system before taking a test?
    • Collect complete and accurate information from all reading assignments and class sessions.
    • Organize many different kinds of effective study materials.
    • Rehearse these study materials with a distributed study schedule.
    • Evaluate to confirm your understanding of all study materials.
  • Collect
  • Organize
  • Rehearse
  • Evaluate

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS BEFORE TAKING TESTS

    • Match the following strategy with its correct description.
      • Repeat statements that revise your beliefs about your ability to do well on tests.
      • Create a mental movie of yourself taking the exam with great success.
      • Avoid stress, get there early, and choose a preferred place to sit.
      • Get a good night’s sleep, eat well, breathe deeply and relax.
  • Prepare yourself physically and emotionally.
  • Arrive early and get comfortable.
  • Visualize success.
  • Create a positive affirmation about taking tests.

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

  • What are some strategies you should implement as soon as you receive a test?
    • Write memory cues on the test.
    • Preview the test.
    • Make a test-smart plan, deciding which questions to answer first and how much time to spend on remaining questions.
  • Christopher Sista

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

    • Part of the answer is false.
    • The question contains unconditional words (e.g., always, never, every, all).
    • The question contains conditional words (e.g., seldom, sometimes, usually, often).
    • You studied hard, but the question contains words you’ve never seen before.
    • You have no idea what the answer is and are reduced to taking a pure guess.
  • FALSE
  • FALSE
  • TRUE
  • FALSE
  • TRUE
  • In the following test situations, identify whether the best guess would be TRUE or FALSE:

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

    • Cross out answers that contain unconditional words.
    • When answers are numbers, cross out highest and lowest.
  • When answers are similar, choose one of them as the correct answer.
  • Form groups of 4 and discuss your lists.
  • Share these strategies with the rest of the class.
  • What strategies can you use when answering multiple choice questions about which you are unsure?

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

    • Always write something in the blank.
    • Make sure the answer fits grammatically into the sentence.
    • Look for answers in other places in the test.
  • Pair up and help each other find strategies in On Course to assist with your challenge.
  • Share your findings with the class.
  • What strategies can you use when answering fill-in-the-blank questions about which you are unsure?

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

  • Which type of recall test question is the greatest challenge for you?
    • Questions that ask for a list
    • Short answer questions
    • Essay questions
    • Definition questions
    • Math problems
  • Pair up and help each other find strategies in On Course to assist with your challenge.
  • Share your findings with the class.

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS WHILE TAKING TESTS

  • What strategies can you use to maximize your point total on any test?
    • If you get stuck, move on; don’t waste time on a question you can’t answer.
    • If you feel anxious, refocus. Close your eyes, breathe deeply, say your affirmation, and try again.
    • Review your answers. Start with the sections that offer the most points.
    • Give an answer for all questions.
    • Proofread before turning in your test.
  • Form groups of 3 and discuss your lists.
  • Share these strategies with the rest of the class.

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS AFTER TAKING TESTS

  • List strategies you could do after your instructor returns a graded test to deepen your learning.
    • Study the instructor’s feedback.
    • Correct wrong answers.
    • Seek help.
    • Seek accommodations if needed.
  • Form groups of 4 and discuss your lists.
  • Share these strategies with the rest of the class.
  • doomu

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE TAKING TESTS ACADEMIC SKILLS PLAN FOR TAKING TESTS

  • Look over the strategies for Taking Tests.
  • Choose three that you will use.
  • Explain to a partner the three that you have chosen and why.
  • End
  • Chapter
  • Six


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