Spring 2007 Course Descriptions, German Department German 101 and German 102: First Year German, 4 cr



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Spring 2007 Course Descriptions, German Department

German 101 and German 102: First Year German, 4 cr.
Course description stays the same.
Required textbooks:

(1) Lovik, Guy, Chavez (1997). Vorsprung. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. (Textbook and Workbook)


Recommended textbooks:

(1) Cecile Zorach and Charlotte Melin. English Grammar for Students of German. Olivia & Hill Press.




  1. A good dictionary. Consult your instructor for specifics.



German 111: Second Semester Dutch, 4 cr.

German 203 and German 204: Second Year German, 4 cr.
Course description stays the same.
Required textbooks:

(1) Moeller, Liedloff, Adolh, Mabee, Berger: Kaleideskop. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Sixth Edition (Textbook and Workbook)


(2) A good dictionary.
Recommended textbook:
(1) Cecile Zorach and Charlotte Melin. English Grammar for Students of German. Olivia & Hill Press.

German 214: Fourth Semester Dutch, 4 cr.

German 221: Introduction to German Literature and Culture I, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 204 or 225, or placement at 5th-semester level and consent of instructor.
Mani, Lec 1, MWF 8:50
This course offers an introduction to 20th century German literature and culture. We will read and discuss a variety of literary and cultural texts, such as short stories, plays, poems, autobiographical writings and essays. Along with the development of reading, speaking and writing skills, the course also provides an introduction to the interpretation and analysis of literary texts. The language of the course is German. The final grade is based on the following four components: class participation, essays, presentations (Referate), and in-class exams.
Required Textbooks:
1. Stimmen eines Jahrhunderts 1888-1990. Andreas Lixl-Purcell (ed). Fort Worth: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1990.

2. Kafka, Brecht, Böll. Erzählungen. Charles Hoffmann et. al (ed). New York: W.W. Norton & Company,  1970.

3. Bertolt Brecht, Die Dreigroschenoper. Bonn: Suhrkamp Taschenbuch Verlag,  1968.

4. Volker Braun. Unvollendete Geschichte. Bonn: Suhrkamp Taschenbuch Verlag,  1977.



Love, Lec 2, MWF 11:00

This course introduces students to the study and interpretation of German literature and cultural topics. Readings will include representative works of twentieth century prose, lyric poetry, and


drama, as well as autobiographical writings and essays; the visual arts and film will be among the cultural topics studied.  Besides daily participation in class discussion, the course work will include informal response papers, two essays, and two exams. The course is conducted in German.

Required textbooks:


    * Bertolt Brecht, Der gute Mensch von Sezuan (Suhrkamp 73) ISBN 3-518-10073-4
    * Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Die Physiker (Diogenes 23047). ISBN 3-_257-23047-8.
    * Eva Kolinsky and Wilfried van der Will, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Modern German Culture (Cambridge University Press, 1998;rpt. 2000). ISBN 0-521-56870-6.
    * A xeroxed course reader.

222: Introduction to German Literature Introduction and Culture II, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 221 or consent of instructor
Mani, Lec 1 MWF 9:55

This course offers an introduction to German literature and culture of the 19th century. We will read and discuss a variety of texts such as short stories, plays, poems, autobiographical writings and philosophical essays. The authors discussed in the course will include Georg Büchner, Theodor Fontane, Heinrich Heine, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Heinrich von Kleist, among others. Along with the development of reading, speaking and writing skills, the course also provides an introduction to the interpretation and analysis of literary texts. The language of the course is German. The final grade is based on the following four components: class participation, essays, presentations, and two in-class exams.


Required Textbooks:

1. Course Reader (available at a local copy shop)

2. Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von. Die Leiden des jungen Werthers. Reclam, 2002. ISBN: 315000067X

3. Hoffman, E.T.A. Der Sandmann. Reclam, 1998. ISBN: 3150002303



225: Composition and Conversation I, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 204 or appropriate score on placement exam
226: Composition and Conversation II, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 225
Love, Lec 1 MWF 9:55
This course, a requirement for all German majors, strengthens and expands the skills practiced in 225, with emphasis on vocabulary building and more complex grammatical structures.  In-class work will include student presentations, discussion of readings, informal conversation, and grammar and vocabulary exercises.  Written work will include frequent short assignments, several longer essays, and three exams.  The course is conducted in German.

Required Textbooks:


   *Turneaure, Brigitte M. Der treffende Ausdruck: Texte, Themen, Übungen. W. W. Norton.

2nd edition.


   * Rankin, Jamie and Larry Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik. Houghton Mifflin.

4th edition



_________________, Lec 2 MWF , 11:00
This course, a requirement for all German majors, continues and strengthens the skills practiced in 225. In-class work will include student presentations, discussion of readings, informal conversation, and grammar and vocabulary exercises. Written work will include frequent grammar and vocabulary exercises and short essays.

Literature in Translation 270, cross-listed with Women’s Studies 270: German Women Writers in Translation, 3 cr.
Open to Freshmen
Kaiser, Lec 1 MW 4:00-5:15 pm
The course is an introduction to aspects of the extensive history of women's writing in German-speaking countries. We begin with a contemporary focus, considering literary responses by women writers in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria to issues of ethnic diversity, racism, citizenship since the restructuring of Europe in 1989/90. Women writers in the united Germany receive particular attention in this section. Once our curiosity has been aroused by considering East-West tensions in Germany, we will trace the development of women's writing historically in the German Democratic Republic (former East Germany) and the Federal Republic of Germany. Issues of gender, sexuality, power are central themes in the socially critical literary
writings by women between 1945 and 1989, as is a strong strand of critical investigation of the Nazi past. The East German writer Christa Wolf and the Austrian writers Ingeborg Bachmann and Elfriede Jelinek (Nobel Prize 2004) will be key authors in our critical investigations.

The transition to a final segment of the course begins with the revived interest during the 1980s in women writers of the Romantic period around 1800. Asking why this renewed historical interest was a provocative challenge to the literary canon in the GDR, we will return to those Romantic writers themselves, contrasting their narrative strategies and choice of genre with more overtly political literary texts by women later in the 19th century.

Course requirements include a mid-term and final, two short interpretive papers, and participation in class discussion.

278 Topic: Nazi Culture, 3 cr.
Hermand and Silberman Lec 1 W 6:00-7:40 pm

Disc 301 M 7:00 – 7:50 pm (Silberman)

Disc 306 W 4:35 – 5:25 pm (Hermand)
Many consider Nazi Germany to be the incarnation of evil in the modern world and its culture to be pure propaganda, produced in a tightly regulated political system with clear objectives and a rigid set of criteria for what was acceptable. Many of these perceptions first arose shortly after World War II, colored by a Cold War tendency to seek commonalities between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, as well as the hasty and highly controversial program of denazification conducted in Germany under Allied occupation. Only during the last 20 years or so have scholars taken a serious look at Nazi culture and revealed a much more complex set of factors at work in all areas of cultural life. This course aims to introduce students to the contradictory conditions that led to cultural shifts when the Nazis came to power and then to examine how new policies influenced cultural life. We will consider propaganda and entertainment films, music and theater, art and architecture, youth education and consumer culture specifically in its appeal to women. The goals of this course will be to identify common misconceptions about culture in Nazi Germany, to gain a deeper understanding of the workings of cultural policy, and to assess whether political ideology was able to form something we can identify as a distinct “Nazi culture.”
Students register both for the lecture and one of the discussion sections. The purpose of the discussion section is to talk about and gain a deeper understanding of the issues raised in the lecture. There will be a few additional short writing assignments as well as additional readings designed to expand upon the topic for the week. In addition, there will be a mid-term and final examination.
Readings will be made available on e-reserves and/or through the course website.
278 Topic: The German Immigration Experience, 3 cr.
Kluge Lec 2 MWF 11:00
This course offers a survey of the immigration experience of Europeans from German-speaking lands. Who were they are why did they come to America? What kind of life and what problems and disappointments did they encounter? Historical, sociological, linguistic, and cultural

aspects will be considered, in order both to gain insight into the greatest movement of peoples in modern times and to view the development of this country from a unique perspective. Open

to freshmen. No German required. Counts as an elective toward the German major.
Lecture, readings, and discussion. Exams, one paper, and a final.

305: Literatur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 221 and 222; or 274 or 284 or consent of instructor
Adler, Lec 1 TR 9:30-10:45

In diesem Kurs werden wir uns eine Auswahl der deutschsprachigen Literatur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts ansehen. Das soll Spaß machen, und Sie als Teilnehmer sollen gleichzeitig etwas lernen. Wir werden Erzählungen, Romane, Dramen und Gedichte von wichtigen Autorinnen und Autoren der deutschsprachigen Literatur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts lesen und diskutieren. Gleichzeitig werden wir einige Techniken zum Verstehen und sinnvollen Lesen von Literatur lernen und vertiefen. Unter ‘unseren’ Autorinnen und Autoren sind Franz Kafka, Bert Brecht, Wolfgang Borchert, Ingeborg Bachmann, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Bernhard Schlink, Thomas Brussig (mit Film!) und ein paar andere mehr. Jede Teilnehmerin und jeder Teilnehmer wird einen kurzen mündlichen Vortrag halten und ein paar kurze Papers zu eng begrenzten Themen schreiben. Am Ende des Semester schreiben wir ein final exam. Der Kurs wird in deutscher Sprache gehalten.


Textbooks:

Brecht, Bertolt, Kalendergeschichten. Reinbek: Rowohlt

Borchert, Wolfgang, Draussen vor der Tür. Reinbek: Rowohlt

Kafka, Franz, Das Urteil. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer

Brussig, Thomas, Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer

Dürrenmatt, Friedrich: Der Richter und sein Henker. Reinbek: Rowohlt



Schlink, Bernhard: Der Vorleser. Zürich: Diogenes
312: Second Semester Dutch for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Grad standing and German 111 or 311 or consent of instructor

314: Fourth Semester Dutch for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Grad standing and German 213 or 313 or consent of instructor

325, meets with 625 and Literature in Translation 326: Topics in Dutch Literature: Anne Frank, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: 4th semester Dutch or consent of instructor
Taylor, Lec 1 MWF 9:55
Literature in Translation 326: Topics in Dutch Literature: Anne Frank, 3 cr
Prerequisites: at least one intermediate-level course in literature
337: Advanced Composition and Conversation, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 226 and one of 222, 274, 284, or consent of instructor
Mödersheim, Lec 1 T-R 2:30-3:45
Dieser Kurs setzt fortgeschrittene Kenntnisse voraus. Ziel ist es, das Lesen - Hören - Sprechen - Schreiben in unterschiedlichen Situationen und Kontexten zu trainieren. Dazu dienen Diskussionen über aktuelle Themen, Aufsätze und Übersetzungen sowie gezielte Stilübungen, Wortschatzübungen und Wiederholung ausgewählter Grammatikkapitel. Behandelt werden Erzählung, Bericht, Reportage, Zeitungsartikel, Werbung, Trivialliteratur und kurze literarische Texte, Alltagsgespräche und formelle Gesprächssituationen, Interview, Rede. Wir wiederholen wichtige Grammatikkapitel und beschäftigen uns mit verschiedenen Textsorten und Stilregeln.
 
Regelmässige Teilnahme und Mitarbeit, schriftliche Tests und Hausaufgaben, mehrere kurze Aufsätze und ein mündliches ein Referat sind die Basis für Notenvergabe.
Web site: http://german.lss.wisc.edu/~smoedersheim/gr337/
 
Textbooks:
Required: Anne Leblans: Was ist deutsch? Houghton Mifflin, 2000
Recommended: Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik. Ed. J. Rankin, L. Wells. Houghton Mifflin
 
352: The German Language in America, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 351 or consent of instructor
Louden, Lec 1 TR 1:00-2:15
In this course we will consider structural and sociolinguistic aspects of German-descended languages/dialects spoken in the United States. Approximately half the course will be devoted to Pennsylvania Dutch, as it is/has been spoken among both Old Order sectarians and  nonsectarians, in Pennsylvania and beyond. In the second half of the  course we will examine German dialects in Wisconsin and Texas German.  The focus on vernacular varieties (Pennsylvania Dutch, various  Wisconsin German dialects, and Texas German) will be complemented by  analysis of standard German as it has been used in writing (e.g., in 
newspapers), but also as a spoken medium, especially in Wisconsin.  For a final project, each student will analyze a digitized interview of interest from the Max Kade Institute's North American German  Dialect Archive.
There are no required texts.

392: German for Graduate Reading Knowledge II, 3 cr.
Senior or graduate standing plus German 391 or consent of instructor
Louden, Lec 1 TR 11:00-12:15


401: First Semester German for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: graduate standing
402: Second Semester German for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and German 101 or 401 or equivalent
403: Third Semester German for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and German 102 or 402 or equivalent
404: Fourth Semester German for Graduate Students, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and German 203 or 403 or equivalent
411: Kultur des 20. Jahrhunderts, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 221 and 222; or 274 or 284; or consent of instructor
Steakley, Lec 1 MWF 11:00
Ziel des Kurses ist es, einen Überblick über kulturelle Bewegungen im Deutschland unseres Jahrhunderts zu vermitteln. In diesem Zeitraum hat Deutschland epochale politische Umwälzungen erlebt, von der aristokratisch geprägten wilhelminischen Epoche zur gescheiterten Demokratie der Weimarer Republik, von der Nazi-Diktatur zur „zweiten Diktatur“ der kommunistischen DDR, vom geteilten Deutschland des kalten Krieges bis zur neuen Bundesrepublik seit 1990. Die kulturellen Strömungen werden im Kontext dieser historischen und gesellschaftlichen Bedingungen gesehen und gedeutet. Besondere Aufmerksamkeit verdienen solche Stile und „-Ismen“ wie: der Expressionismus, die neue Sachlichkeit, faschistischer Neuklassizismus und „Blut und Boden“-Kunst, der sozialistische Realismus der DDR und die restaurierte Moderne der BRD. Vor allem sollen Beispiele aus der Malerei und Architektur herangezogen werden, um diese Stilrichtungen zu illustrieren.

Wöchentliche Leseaufgaben, die jeden Freitag diskutiert werden, bieten eine Vielfalt von Perspektiven. Bei unserer theoretischen Auseinandersetzung stehen vor allem, aber keineswegs ausschließlich, marxistische und freudianische Interpretations­ansätze zur Diskussion. Die Montags- und Mittwochssitzungen sind hauptsächlich für Vorlesungen vorgesehen.

Wir werden uns auch zwei Filme ansehen: Metropolis (1925) und Die Ehe der Maria Braun (1979). Zu diesen Filmen schreibt jeder Student/jede Studentin jeweils ein Paper (5 Seiten, 1250 Wörter), und zwar auf deutsch. Darüber hinaus schreibt jeder Student/jede Studentin eine Hausarbeit (12 Seiten, 3000 Wörter, entweder auf englisch oder auf deutsch). Das Thema wird zwischen dem Studenten/der Studentin und Prof. Steakley individuell vereinbart.

611: Survey of German Literature to 1700, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Senior standing or consent of instructor
Calomino, Lec 1 TR 11:00-12:15
This course deals with representative works of literature from the oldest records to the early eighteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on the Carolingian period and early Germanic literature; a courtly aesthetic as developed and reflected in literary genres from the 12th and 13th centuries; late medieval narrative, philosophical and dramatic texts; the Reformation and its implications for German literature and culture throughout the 16th and 17th centuries; preservation of inherited literary modes of expression and the development of new forms during the Baroque and early Enlightenment. Recommended for background reading: F.Heer, The Medieval World: Europe 1100-1350 (Mentor MW 1040) and/or Frenzel, Daten deutscher Dichtung, I (DTV 3003). The objective of the course is to familiarize students with early German literature in addition to its cultural, sociopolitical, and artistic background. The course will concentrate on the development of lyric, epic, and dramatic forms especially through interpretation of major works and writers of the different periods. Lectures based on reading and background materials are in German; classroom discussion and written examinations may be in either German or English. In addition to daily required participation, each student will give an oral presentation on a specific topic. Reading list will include selections from Old High German heroic and religious literature, Das Nibelungenlied, courtly “Minnesang”, Parzival, Der Ackermann aus Böhmen, and texts by Luther, Sachs, and Grimmelshausen.

625: Topics in Dutch Literature: Anne Frank, 3-4 cr.
Prerequisites: 4th semester Dutch or consent of instructor
Taylor, Lec 1 MWF 9:55

Disc 301 T 9:55

644: Theory and Practice of German Drama, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: A 300-level German lit. course with B or better, or consent of instructor
Gross and Roth, Lec 1 M 5:30-8:00 pm

Schwerpunkt-Thema: Das Volksstück

Zielgruppe: fortgeschrittene Undergraduate- sowie Graduate-Studenten.
Dieser Kurs wird alle zwei Jahre im Frühjahr angeboten: er verbindet Theorie und Praxis des Theaters. Er bietet wesentlich mehr als "normale" 3-credit-Kurse, aber verlangt auch viel mehr von den TeilnehmerInnen.

Während der ersten Phase des Kurses (bis Anfang/Mitte Maerz) werden wir in Seminarsitzungen ausgewählte Texte über das Theater lesen – zunächst Klassiker wie Aristoteles, Lessing und Brecht, weiterhin ausgewählte Texte zum Schwerpunkt Volkstheater. Unsere Aufmerksamkeit wird vor allem der satirischen und sozialkritischen Volkstheatertradition seit Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts gelten, die besonders in der österreichischen Literatur etabliert ist: wir lesen Johann Nestroys Einen Jux will er sich machen, Brechts Herr Puntila und sein Knecht Matti sowie Ödön von Horvaths Glaube Liebe Hoffnung. Außerdem werden wir erste praktische Übungen machen.

Wesentliches Element des Kurses ist unsere eigene Aufführung eines Stücks: Mitte März trifft unser Gastregisseur Manfred Roth aus Deutschland ein und wird mit den TeilnehmerInnen Horvaths Glaube Liebe Hoffnung inszenieren. Das heißt: Mitte März beginnt eine intensive Probenphase mit ca. drei mehrstündigen Proben pro Woche. An diesem praktischen Teil des Kurses kann man nicht nur als SchauspielerIn, sondern auch beispielsweise als BühnenmanagerIn, BeleuchterIn, TechnikerIn, RequisiteurIn, ProgrammgestalterIn oder Pressekontakt teilnehmen. Aufführungen in Madison finden statt am 7., 8. und 9. Mai.

Es ist möglich, an der Aufführung teilzunehmen (auch für Independent Studies credit), ohne den ganzen Kurs zu machen - sprechen Sie mit Sabine Groß (262-0647, 246-9937, sgross@ wisc.edu).


Texte:

- Aristoteles: Poetik. Übersetzt und herausgegeben von Manfred Fuhrmann. Reclam 7828.

- Nestroy, Johann: Einen Jux will er sich machen. Reclam.  ISBN 3-15-003041-2.

- Bertolt Brecht: Herr Puntila und sein Knecht Matti. Suhrkamp BasisBibliothek. ISBN: 3-518-18850-X.

- Ödön von Horvath: Glaube Liebe Hoffnung. Suhrkamp taschenbuch. ISBN: 3-518-39838-5
651: Introduction to Middle High German, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Advanced knowledge of German
Calomino, Lec 1 TR 9:30-10:45
This course will introduce students to Middle High German grammar and vocabulary with the goals of fluency and accuracy in reading medieval texts. Lectures and discussions will cover topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. During the course of the semester students will read Das Nibelungenlied and a representative selection from various genres of Middle High German literature. Class time will be devoted to translation and to discussion of grammatical/lexical topics. Participants will write mid-semester and final examinations.

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of German.


Required Texts
Weinhold/Ehrismann/Moser, Kleine mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik.

Lexer, Mittelhochdeutsches Taschenwörterbuch.

Weddige, Mittelhochdeutsch. Eine Einführung.

Bartsch/De Boor, ed. Das Nibelungenlied.


Recommended
Hennig, Kleines Mittelhochdeutsches Wörterbuch

Paul/Wiehl/Grosse, Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik.

Saran/Nagel, Das Übersetzen aus dem Mittelhochdeutschen.
676: Revolution im deutschen Drama und Film, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 337 and 2 additional advanced German courses or consent of instructor

Silberman, M 3:30-5:30 pm
This seminar will explore the intersection of art and mass politics in Germany. The fact that the “German revolution” was so late in coming possibly explains the imaginative energy invested in representations of revolution and its failure. Again and again German writers and film makers have been inspired by the strife of historical revolutions to work through anxieties and project utopias in their own times. Thus, we will begin by reading German interpretations of the French Revolution from the nineteenth century (Georg Büchner, Arthur Schnitzler) and twentieth century (Peter Weiss, Heiner Müller), followed by cinematic representations produced during the Weimar Republic (Ernst Lubitsch, Dmitri Buchowetzki, Hans Behrendt). Then we will focus on treatments of the German Revolution of 1918 (a 1920s drama by Brecht and Margarethe von Trotta’s much more recent bio-pic about Rosa Luxemburg). Finally we will consider attempts at addressing revolution in the latter part of the twentieth century, the “student revolution” of the late 1960s and the “velvet revolution” of 1989 (a novelle by Peter Schneider as well as films by Werner Herzog and Harun Farocki).
Seminars are group discussions, so preparation and participation are essential. Each student will in addition be expected to guide the discussion of one seminar session, to present a “Referat” about the final project, and to complete a research paper of 18-20 pages on that project. The course will be conducted in German.
Books to purchase:

Georg Büchner, Dantons Tod (Klett Verlag, ISBN 3123512002)

Arthur Schnitzler, Der grüne Kakadu (Reclam Verlag, ISBN 3150083990)

Peter Weiss, Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats (Suhrkamp BasisBibliothek, ISBN 3518188496)

Heiner Müller, Der Auftrag und andere Revolutionsstücke (Reclam Verlag, ISBN 3150084709)

Bertolt Brecht, Trommeln in der Nacht (Edition Suhrkamp 490, ISBN 351810490X)

Peter Schneider, Lenz (Rotbuch Verlag, ISBN 3880220913)
[additional readings will be posted to the course website for downloading and films will be screened outside of the seminar sessions]
711: Imaginationen des Fremden, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing
Moedersheim, Topic: Wiener Moderne Lec 2 MW 1:00-2:15
Wien war um 1900 das kulturelle Zentrum der multi-ethnischen österreichisch-ungarischen K.u.K.- Monarchie, die sich aufgrund nationaler, wirtschaftlicher und gesellschaftlicher Spannungen und Krisen in der Dekadenz befand. Motive und Themen der modernen Strömungen in Dichtung und Kunst der Jahrhundertwende waren die Krise der Sprache und des Bewußtseins, das komplexe Innenleben des Individuums, Zerfall, Dekadenz und Tod. In diesem Seminar beschäftigen wir uns mit literarischen, philosophischen und ästhetischen Fragen, dem Zusammenspiel von Musik und Theater, Kunst und Literatur, Philosophie und Wissenschaft, Kunst und Architektur in der Wiener Moderne.


755: Old High German, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: German 651 or consent of instructor.
Howell, Lec 1 TR 11:00-12:15

758: Morphophonology, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing
Salmons, Lec 1 MWF 11:00
Using historical and contemporary data from German, its dialects and its Germanic relatives, we will focus on the interaction of sound patterns and word forms, especially in language change, mostly over time, but also in the course of first or second-language acquisition. Some issues will include how umlaut has evolved to its present status (along with consideration of just what that status is), the effects of final vowel loss (apocope) on inflection in German, and the overall shapes of words (‘templates’).
Texts: We will read research articles and manuscripts, almost all available on-line.

Prerequisite: Grad status or permission of instructor.


804: Interdisciplinary Western European Area Studies Seminar, 3 cr.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of instructor
Berghahn (German and Jewish Studies), W 3:30-5:30 pm

McDonald (UW-Madison History Dept.)

Weitz (History) and Mcormick (German) – University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
War, Peace and the Emergence of the Idea of a United Europe, 1648 – 2003
In Kant’s treatise On Perpetual Peace (1795) one finds the surprising statement that “Nature has chosen war as a means of obtaining peace.” This utterance is even more disturbing because it is part of Kant’s reasoning “On the Guaranties of Perpetual Peace.” After he had already enumerated calculations how to avoid wars in his six Preliminary Articles and laid the legal groundwork for a perpetual peace in his three Definite Articles, he thought it to be necessary to provide moral and legal postulates for peace with a philosophical grounding, which is embedded in his teleological perspective of history. If Nature herself exhibit a purposeful plan in the evolution of the world , there must also be a hidden plan in world history to achieve peace, so Kant reasons by analogy. The state of nature among men, which is war, compels them over centuries to enter into legal relationships, which foster peace. Although Kant himself thinks that this idea is far-fetched in theory, he considers it reasonable, even dogmatic, in practice, since it makes our duty to promote peace.
This dialectic of war seems like a Mephistophelian principle of history that promotes war and accomplishes peace. The palimpsest of this idea are two older concepts of war and peace, namely that of a “just war” to establish peace and of a “last war” to end all wars. The idea of a “just war” was a justification of going to war for centuries, and the apocalyptic logic of a “last war” is an idea of the Enlightenment which fascinated both Saint Pierre, who first developed the idea of a federation of nations to safeguard peace, and Rousseau in his radical criticism of the cabinet wars of the 18th century. We want to test Kant’s hypothesis and the idea of a “just war” by looking at war and peace since the Thirty Years War and how wars contributed to the necessity of a peaceful and united Europe.
When Thomas More dedicated his Utopia (1516) to Erasmus, he responded with his Querela Pacis (1517), and since then, especially since the Enlightenment, the hope for a permanent peace has been articulated in many texts up to the present which all have a utopian tinge. (Saint Pierre, Rousseau, Bentham, Kant, Fr. Schlegel, Hoelderlin, Novalis, Fichte, Berta von Suttner, Nobel, Einstein, Freud, Russell, Anan, and many others). It is this cluster of theoretical and poetic texts, that interest us and it should interest graduate students in the departments of History, Literature, and Political/ Social Sciences.
It is the dialectic of war and the infinite postponement of world peace, the enhanced destructiveness of warfare and the advance of human rights, that structure our seminar:
1. A short introductory section, dealing with the older (pre-Enlightenment) ideas on war and peace.

2. A historical overview of the major theories and justifications of war.

3. A historical survey of strategic military thinking from Clausewitz to Schliefen.

4. A social and political history of warfare in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

5. A discussion of efforts to limit the impact of war through international conventions and of the advance of human rights standards.

6. A historical survey of modern peace proposals since Kant.

7. A discussion of our most recent experiences after September 11, 2001 and the open-ended “War on Terror”.
A Lecture Series with prominent scholar from the United States and abroad will enrich the seminar.
Literature:
Immanuel Kant: Perpetual Peace and Other Essay. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing (n.d.)

Course packet


947: See German 804, above
960: The German Language in America, 3 cr.

Prerequisites: German 939


Louden, Sem 1 TR 1:00-2:15
In this course we will consider structural and sociolinguistic aspects of German-descended languages/dialects spoken in the United States. Approximately half the course will be devoted to Pennsylvania Dutch, as it is/has been spoken among both Old Order sectarians and  nonsectarians, in Pennsylvania and beyond. In the second half of the  course we will examine German dialects in Wisconsin and Texas German.  The focus on vernacular varieties (Pennsylvania Dutch, various  Wisconsin German dialects, and Texas German) will be complemented by  analysis of standard German as it has been used in writing (e.g., in 
newspapers), but also as a spoken medium, especially in Wisconsin.  For a final project, each student will analyze a digitized interview of interest from the Max Kade Institute's North American German  Dialect Archive.
There are no required texts.
970: Resistance and Subversion in Foreign Language Teaching
Prerequisites: Graduate standing
Chavez, Sem 1 MW 8:00-9:15
In this seminar-style class, we will first review concepts pertaining to identity, agency, power, norms, policy, expertness, Activity Theory, and Language (and professional) Socialization and then examine how these help describe and possibly explain, instances of resistance, subversion, or non-participation in the specific (and limited) context of the foreign/second language classroom. Agents of resistant behaviors can be learners as well as teachers. Their behaviors can target the language and/or its associated speech community, the need (or "requirement") to learn the language, language-use and/or social norms of the classroom community, members of the classroom community (including the teacher/learners and peer teachers or learners), professional conventions, carriers of norms and requirements (for example, the course supervisor, the "profession", the university), the curriculum and/or instructional materials, pedagogic objectives and practices, and loss of/change in/threats to identity.
Participants will contribute to class discussions, based on intensive readings in the earlier phase of the course. After assignments aimed at exploring the viability of potential research questions (e.g., interviews, class observations), participants will form collaborative research teams, each undertaking an originally-designed study. Each participant will also draft at least two versions of an abstract of his/her group's research project, which could later be submitted to a professional conference. Readings will be drawn from recent (2000 or later) volumes of various professional journals and be available in the form of a course reader at Bob's Copy Shop (on Johnson Street) just before the beginning of the semester.
The course will be conducted in English. Expertise in second language acquisition is not a pre-requisite.
There will be a packet of xeroxed material for the course readings.
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