Spanish and Latin American Studies Content Modules 2017/18 Level 4 Modules: Full Module Title: Introducción al mundo hispánico Module Code



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Full Module Title:

Survey of 20th Century Spanish Film

Module Code:

ARIB128S5



Credits/Level:

30 Credits / Level 5



Convenor:

Dr Mari Paz Balibrea



Lecturer:

Dr Mari Paz Balibrea



Entrance Requirements:

Language pre-requisite: Normally Spanish 3 or equivalent, but a strong Spanish 2 level is also acceptable. Classes will be taught in English with some films in Spanish without subtitles.



Day/Time:
Tuesdays 7.40-9.00 pm (Terms 1 and 2)

Module Description:

Through a focus on key authors and works, this course introduces students to central aspects in twentieth century Spanish film placed in their historical and cultural contexts. The module offers a survey of the main trends in the history of 20th C Spanish cinema and will familiarize students with basic technical and theoretical issues in film study such as: editing, sound, framing, camerawork, lighting, mise-en-scène, costume, genre, self-referentiality and intertextuality, the construction of a national (or regional) cinema, censorship and spectatorship.



Syllabus:
TERM 1
Week 1: Introduction, the origins of Spanish film

Weeks 2 and 3: The early years

Case study: Selection of fragments accessible via Youtube

Weeks 4-5: The avant-garde

Case study: Luis Buñuel/Salvador Dalí: Un chien andalou

Weeks 7-8: The Spanish Civil War and the film industry

Case study: André Malraux: Sierra de Teruel

Week 9-10: Francoism: the heroic years

Case study: José Luis Saenz de Heredia: Raza

Week 11: Francoism: The Old Spanish Cinema (1)



TERM 2
Week 1: Francoism: The Old Spanish Cinema (2)

Case study: José Luis Saenz de Heredia: Franco, ese hombre.

Weeks 2-3: Francoism: The New Spanish Cinema

Case study: Carlos Saura: Ana y los lobos

Weeks 4-5: Spanish Transition: New Documentary

Case study: Basilio Martín Patino: Caudillo

Weeks 7-8: Democracy: Spain Redefined

Case study: Pedro Almodóvar: Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios

Weeks 9-10: Beyond National Cinema

Case study: Alejandro Amenábar: Los otros

Week 11: Concluding remarks and essay workshop

Assessment Table:


Assignment

Description

Weighting

Oral presentation + written log of it

10 minutes individual presentation + 1500-word log

(breakdown: 40% presentation

60% log)


30%

Critical Review

1,500 words

30%

Essay

2,500 words

40%



Essential Texts:
Films:
Luis Buñuel/Salvador Dalí: Un chien andalouAndré Malraux: Sierra de Teruel

Carlos Saura: La caza

José Luis Saenz de Heredia: Raza

José Luis Saenz de Heredia: Franco, ese hombre.

Carlos Saura: Ana y los lobos

Basilio Martín Patino: Caudillo

Pedro Almodóvar: Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios

Alejandro Amenábar: Los otros. Available through BoB: (https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/index.php/prog/00509072?bcast=123388127)
Secondary reading:
Jo Labanyi and Tatjana Pavlović (eds). A Companion to Spanish Cinema. London: Blackwell, 2013

Jordan, Barry and Mark Allinson. Spanish Cinema. A Student’s Guide. London: Bloomsbury, 2005


Full Module Title:

Power and Control in Spanish Golden Age Art

Module Code:

ARCL010S5



Credits/Level

30 credits / Level 5



Convenor:

Dr Carmen Fracchia



Lecturer(s):

Dr Carmen Fracchia



Entrance Requirements:

This module will be taught in English. There is no language requirement other than English.



Day/Time:

Thursdays 6.00-7.30 pm (Terms 2 and 3)



Module Description:

The central theme of this course will be the ways in which works of art respond to issues of power and control, including patronage, censorship, class, and gender from the sixteenth to the seventeenth century in Imperial Spain. There will be a greater emphasis on the relations between religion, slavery, race and the visual form. We will explore the effects that a series of crucial events had in the articulations of the visual forms, such as the conquest and imperial expansion in the New World and in Africa; the Christian re-conquest of the Kingdom of Granada; the workings of the Inquisition and the imperial policies of purity of blood; the transatlantic slave trade, and, the Catholic Reformation. The course will also be structured around a series of key places where visual forms of the baroque period were more complex during the Habsburg Empire: Toledo, Madrid and Seville.


Primary texts to be examined will include the works by painters and sculptors such as Sofonisba Anguissola, El Greco, Bartolomé Murillo, José Ribera, La Roldana, Diego Velázquez, and, Francisco de Zurbarán.

Syllabus:__TERM_2_Week_1'>Syllabus:
TERM 2
Week 1 Introduction

Week 2 Empire and the production of the visual form

Week 3 The Catholic Reformation/Counter-Reformation and the Habsburgs: Censorship: El Escorial

Week 4 Counter-Reformation: Censorship and transgression: works by El Greco

Week 5 Counter-Reformation: The Christian body and popular devotion: works by Bartolomé Murillo, José Ribera, Francisco Zurbarán

Week 6 Reading Week

Week 7 Counter-Reformation and popular devotion: polychrome sculptures and processional sculptures and works by La

Roldana


Week 8 Counter-Reformation and Catholic Ortodox Husmanism: works by Velázquez and Ribera

Week 9 Empire, Portraiture and Identity

Week 10 Gender: Fashioning the Self: self-portraits by Sofonisba Anguissola

Week 11 Revision
TERM 3
Week 1 Gender: Fashioning the ‘Other’ notions and portraits of women and prostitutes: Works by Murillo and Velázquez

Week 2 Gender: Fashioning the Self: self-portraits by Bartolomé Murillo, Francisco Zurbarán y Diego Velázquez

Week 3 Gender: Fashioning the ‘Other’:’ monstruos’ and ‘dwarfs’: Works by Velázquez and Ribera

Week 4 Empire and Human Diversity: Slavery (1)

Week 5 Empire and Human Diversity: Slavery (2)

Week 6 Reading Week

Week 7 Empire, Visual Culture, and Human Diversity: Slavery

visual form (1): Miracle of the Black Leg



Week 8 Slavery: Fashioning the ‘Other’

Week 9 Slavery in New Spain

Week 10 Slavery in New Spain

Week 11 Revision

Assessment Table:


Assignment

Description

Weighting

Written commentary

1,500 words

30%

Critical book review

1,500 words

30%

Essay

2,500 words

40%



Essential Texts:
Brown, J., The Golden Age of Painting in Spain (1991) OR Painting in Spain 1500-1700 (1998).

Domínguez Ortíz, A., The Golden Age of Spain, 1516 -1659 (1971).

Earle, T. F. and K. J. P. Lowe (eds.), Black Africans in Renaissance Europe (2005), chapters Introduction, 3,10,11, and 15.

Fracchia, C., ‘Constructing the Black Slave in Early Modern Spanish Painting’ in Tom Nichols (ed.), Others and Outcasts in Early Modern Europe: Picturing the Social Margins (2007).

Fracchia, C.,‘The Urban Slave in Spain and New Spain’, in Elizabeth McGrath and Jean Michel Massing (eds.), The Slave in European Art: From Renaissance Trophy to Abolitionist Emblem. The Warburg Colloquia Series, Vol. 20 (2012), pp. 195-216.

Harrison, Charles, Paul Wood and Jason Gaiger (eds.), Art in Theory: 1648-1815: An Anthology of Changing Ideas (Oxford, 2000): see early modern Spanish art theorists (Vicente Carducho, Francisco Pacheco, Antonio Palomino).



Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe (2012), Exhibition catalogue, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore: http://issuu.com/the-walters-art-museum/docs/singlepages3429_african_presence_10/3?e=1251836/5419900

West, S., Portraiture (2003).


Level 6 Modules:

Full Module Title:

Contemporary Latin American Literature and Art

Module Code:

LNLN036S6

Credits/Level:

30 Credits / Level 6

Convenor:

Prof John Kraniauskas

Lecturer(s):

Prof John Kraniauskas

Entrance Requirements:

Language pre-requisite: Spanish 3 or equivalent (all texts to be read in Spanish)


Day/Time:

Mondays 6.00 – 7.30 pm

Module Description:


In this course you will explore the work of three key Latin American writers in terms of their relation to both the literary and social history of the region. Mario Vargas Llosa, winner of the Nobel Prize, is still writing today, but we will look at his work in the light of the 1960s and 1970s; Ricardo Piglia (Argentina) is a writer and critic of the 1980s; and Roberto Bolaño (Chile) of the turn of the century; and each in their own way expresses – paradigmatically – the cultural and political conflicts of their time. Key critical themes explored in this course are the relations between literature and: modernity; history and ideology; dictatorship; the figure of the author/intellectual; technologies of representation and communication; violence and globalization.

Syllabus:


Term 1

Mario Vargas Llosa

Conversación en la catedral

La guerra del fin del mundo

Ricardo Piglia:

Selected short stories from La invasion, Nombre falso and Prisión perpetua

Respiración artificial

Term 2

Ricardo Piglia (cont):

La cuidad ausente

Plata quemada

Blanco nocturno

Roberto Bolaño:

2666


Assessment:

Term 1: Essay (2500 words)

Term 2: Essay (3500 words)




Essential Texts:

All novels mentioned in the syllabus above.


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