School of Mathematical & Computer Sciences Dept of Computer Science



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Coursework


Each course comprises elements of formative and summative coursework, details of which will be made available through the respective course in VISION.
Feedback on formative coursework, such as exercises, lab work, group discussion, textbook questions, will be provided to you by your Approved Learning Partner.
Summative coursework will be assessed by your ALP and moderated by Heriot-Watt University. All summative coursework should be completed to a satisfactory standard (Grade D) for a student to pass the course but will not form part of your final grade. If you do not complete the summative coursework to a satisfactory standard you will not be awarded credits for the course or receive your exam results until this is completed.
All summative coursework should be submitted both to HWU via VISION and to your local tutor via e-mail. Please follow the submission procedures specified for each assignment on VISION.
The exception will be the Third Year Group Project which will account for 50% of the grade for F29SO Software Engineering and F29PD Professional Development Synoptic pair.

Coursework Resubmission Policy

Students who fail the coursework 3 times may be allowed a 4th opportunity for the coursework if they have mitigating circumstances.  If they have such circumstances, then the 4th attempt will be their final one.

Students who have failed their coursework 3 (or exceptionally4) times must either repeat the course, or choose one of the new courses, Emerging Technologies or Interaction Design and attend and pass that course.

Plagiarism & Cheating


Cheating in examination and plagiarism, which is, the presentation of another person’s ideas or work as one’s own, are very serious offences and are dealt with severely. They carry a range of penalties up to and including expulsion from the University.
Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with University policy on these matters. For more detail, see the sections on Plagiarism and Regulation 9 on the Registry’s website.

Grades & Assessments


Grades for each course are awarded as follows:


Grade A

Excellent

Overall mark of approximately 70% or more

Grade B

Very Good

Overall mark of approximately 60% to 69%

Grade C

Good

Overall mark of approximately 50% to 59%

Grade D

Satisfactory

Overall mark of approximately 40% to 49%

Grade E

Adequate

Minimum required for the award of credits but at least a grade D is needed for progression to subsequent courses

Grade F

Inadequate

Fail

If you do not pass a course at the first attempt, you have one opportunity to resit the course at the next examination diet.


Notification of Special Circumstances


It is very important that you notify your mentor as soon as possible of any special circumstances, such as illness or bereavement, which could adversely affect your assessment performance. In the case of illness, a medical certificate must be supplied. The Examiners will always take such circumstances into account where appropriate, but the later the notification, the less scope there is to do so.
In particular, notification should be before the examination diet concerned, and certainly no later than the Examiners Meeting. Late notification will mean that either no account can be taken, or that formal procedures have to be invoked. In the latter case, final year students will not be permitted to graduate until these procedures have been completed. For further details, see the University Regulations in PART B of this handbook.

BSc Computer Systems Programme Structure


2012/13

Programme Code

F2CD-CSE
Programme Title



Computer Systems
School

Mathematical & Computer Sciences



Type
Awards

BSc (Ord), Diploma of Higher Education, Certificate of Higher Education



Programme Accredited by
UCAS Code
QAA Subject Benchmarking Group(s)

Computing



Date of Production/Revision

June 2012/2013



Stage Composition
Arrangement of Courses: (Themes and Subject Streams)

Awards, Credits & Levels
Mandatory Courses

Optional Courses

Elective Courses
Stage 1

8 courses:


6 mandatory

2 elective


Semester 1
F27SA

Software

Development 1
F27PX

Praxis


F27IS

Interactive Systems



Semester 2
F27SB

Software

Development 2
F27CS

Introduction to Computer Systems


F27WD

Web Design and Databases



Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1
Choose 1 from approved list (See Table 1)

Semester 2
Choose 1 from approved list (See Table 1)

Certificate of Higher Education
Requires 120 SCQF credits at level 7

Stage 2

8 courses:
6 mandatory

2 elective

F28IN

Interaction Design


F28DA

Data Structures & Algorithms


F28IT

Internet & Communications


F28SD


Software Design
F28DM

Database Management Systems


F28PL

Programming Languages

Choose 1 from approved list (See Table 2)
Choose 1 from approved list (See Table 2)

Diploma of Higher Education
Requires 240 SCQF credits incl. 90 at level 8 or higher


BSc Computer Systems Programme Structure

2012/13

Programme Code

F2CD
Programme Title



Computer Systems
School

Mathematical & Computer Sciences



Type
Awards

BSc (Ord), Diploma of Higher Education, Certificate of Higher Education



Programme Accredited by
UCAS Code
QAA Subject Benchmarking Group(s)

Computing



Date of Production/Revision

26 June 2012/201213



Stage Composition
Arrangement of Courses: (Themes and Subject Streams)

Awards, Credits & Levels
Mandatory courses

Optional Courses

Elective Courses
Semester 2

Stage 3

8 courses:


All

mandatory




Semester 1
F29SO

Software Engineering

F29GR

Computer


Graphics
C89OM

Operations Management 1


C89OP

Operations Management 2



Semester 2
F29PD

Professional Development

F29KM

Knowledge Management






Choose 1 of:
F29AI

Artificial Intelligence & Intelligent Agents

F28IN

Interaction Design







Choose 1 of:
F29OC

Operating Systems & Concurrency



F27EM

Emerging Technologies




Semester 1


Semester 2


Ordinary or General Degree
Requires 360 SCQF credits incl 60 at level 9


Elective Courses (Subject to provision by Approved Learning Partner)


Table 1 (Stage 1) ALP

Notes

Introduction to Accounting 1 (C87AT) and Introduction to Accounting 2 (C87AU)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 7 (30 credits)

Introduction to Economics 1 (C87EN) and Introduction to Economics 2 (C87EO)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 7 (30 credits)

Introduction to Finance 1(C87FI) and Introduction to Banking and Financial Services (C87BF)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 7 (30 credits)

Introduction to Management 1 (C87MT) and Introduction to Management 2 (C87MU)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 7 (30 credits)




Table 2 (Stage 2) ALP

Notes

Finance Theory and Markets 1 (C88FT) and Finance Theory and Markets 2 (C88FU)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 8 (30 credits)

Organisational Behaviour (C88OB) and Human Resource Management (C88HM)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 8 (30 credits)

Financial Accounting (C88FR) and Management Accounting (C88MA)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 8 (30 credits)

Marketing Fundamentals (C88MF) and Marketing Perspectives (C88CM)

Courses synoptically linked for assessment purposes – both SCQF level 8 (30 credits)


Stage Notes
Stage Two:

  • Direct entrants to Stage 2 and internal transfers from other degrees will be expected have an appropriate background in programming and database technology.


Stage Three:

  • Direct entrants to Stage 3 and internal transfers from other degrees will be expected have appropriate programming experience and background knowledge.

  • Candidates shall pursue a group project throughout the year, which shall be synoptically assessed in conjunction with material from the associated courses (F29SO1 and F29PD2)



Educational Aims of the Course
The educational aim is to provide students with a theoretical foundation and applied skills in Computer Science in addition to other professional skills which will enable graduates to communicate clearly, work independently and co-operate effectively. The balance of skills will enable graduates to work effectively and efficiently in industry and commerce and prepare them for postgraduate study.

The Course provides opportunities for learners to achieve the following outcomes:



Subject Mastery


Understanding, Knowledge and Cognitive Skills

  • To develop knowledge and skills in the elicitation and analysis of user requirements, design and evaluation of solutions, and the implementation and quality assurance of the chosen solution.

  • To be able to develop well-structured, efficient, usable and well-documented programs.

  • To know what general classes of problems are amenable to computer solution and be able to select the appropriate tools required for particular problems.

  • To be able to develop an abstract model for a given problem and devise appropriate mechanized techniques to solve the problem.

  • To develop the knowledge and skills required to meet the challenges of emerging technologies and methodologies.


Scholarship, Enquiry and Research

  • To gain an in depth understanding of the theoretical foundations of computation and its relevance to everyday computing.

  • To be able to design, implement, document, verify and validate relatively large heterogeneous software systems.

  • To be able to assess the quality of software systems, both in terms of their functional and non-functional properties.











Personal Abilities

Industrial, Commercial and Professional Practice

  • To maintain and update technical knowledge; to take responsibility for personal and professional development.

  • To appraise the impact of computers on society and the influence of society on the development of the technology and use of computers.

  • To assess aspects of the law related to computer-based information or the role of standards in safety, quality and security, of security issues and of the BCS Codes of Practice and Conduct.


Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others


  • To undertake self-directed work; to assimilate information from multiple sources; to examine results and generate conclusions; to impart ideas effectively in visual, verbal or written form.

  • To work effectively either individually or as part of a team.

  • To apply subject-mastery outcomes to monitor, analyse, model, specify, design, communicate, implement, evaluate, control and plan.

  • To be aware of, and be able to respond to, the social and legal implications and consequences of the use of computers.

  • To be able to analyse problem spaces; develop and work with abstractions; appraise material and ideas; to apply a methodical and innovative approach to problem solving; to integrate theory and practice


Communication, Numeracy and ICT


  • To be able to communicate with peers, more senior colleagues and specialists. In addition, communicate using appropriate methods to a range of audiences, i.e. specialists and non-specialists.

  • To be able to undertake critical evaluation/analysis of a wide range of numerical and graphical data.


Approaches to Teaching and Learning:

Lectures, Tutorials (practicals, laboratories), Coursework, (assignments, individual projects, group projects, essays, reports, presentations, log/journals, dissertation), Self-study are linked to lecture-based, resource-based and problem-based teaching styles, to relate with motivational, assimilative, consolidative and evaluative phases of learning.


Approaches to teaching and learning are continually reviewed and developed with the aim of matching them to the abilities and experiences of students, with regard also for the subject area. Specific details about teaching and learning methods are provided in the appropriate course descriptors.

Assessment Policies:

The following assessment methods are used:


Understanding, knowledge and subject specific skills are assessed through the range of methods reflected by written examinations, coursework assignments, software artifacts, group and individual projects, written reports and oral presentations. Diagnostic, formative, continuous and summative types of assessment aim to correlate with methods of assessment.
Approaches to assessment are continually reviewed. Specific details about methods of assessment are provided in the appropriate course descriptors

BSc Computer Systems



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