Scheme of work as sociology (7191/1) and a-level Sociology Year 1 (7192/1) Introduction



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Scheme of work


AS Sociology (7191/1) and A-level Sociology Year 1 (7192/1)

Introduction


The following is a scheme of work for the first year of the A-level and the AS. It has been created on the basis that students choose families and households as their optional topic. It is based on the Autumn and Winter terms comprising 15 weeks and the Summer term comprising 3 – 6 weeks. In addition, the number of teaching hours per week is 4 ½ but for the first week of Autumn term.

The following key words have been used in this scheme of work:

Reference to any new content will be preceded with the keyword NC.

Any links to AS exam technique only will be preceded with AS Exam Technique– all students to complete the same assessments regardless of whether they are sitting the AS or not as these serve to build up exam skills for all learners.

Any links to A-level exam technique only will be preceded with A-level Exam Technique – these will be completed as extension activities for those completing the full A-level.

Any homework set will be preceded with the keyword HMWK.

Reference has also been made to a college “scoopit” and “moodle” on the basis that your centre has this facility. Suggested places where students can be directed to activities using these facilities have been incorporated into this scheme of work.

The specimen exam papers are referred to in this scheme of work. There are two sets of specimen papers. One set is located on the website. The second set of specimen papers are located on eAQA to enable these to be used as mock exams.



Assumed coverage/instructions for key activities


Paper based starters: All lessons will start with a paper based activity that involves re-capping prior learning, going over key concepts or introducing new ideas and terminology. These are created using teacher resources and websites to help produce word searches, cross words, puzzles. There are some examples of paper based starters and other resources that can be used with this scheme of work in the A-level Sociology Resource Bank on our website. Any resources that are in this Resource Bank and which are referred to in this scheme of work will be preceded with RB in this scheme of work.

Powerpoints: Teachers need to create powerpoints using various sources that summarise key theories and ideas. Guidance has been given in this scheme of work as to topics to be covered using this teaching method. Textbooks can be used to help create these powerpoints.

Popcorn: A reading technique used to encourage students to keep on task. One student starts reading and the rules are that they read at least one sentence and that they have to read until the end of the sentence. Once they have finished they say popcorn followed by the name of the person they would like to continue reading. The person that has been selected has to continue reading where they left off.

Concept grids: Students will complete a concept grid for all key topics using a range of strategies to embed knowledge.

Summary grids: Students will complete a summary grid at various times as indicated in the following scheme of work.

Quick quiz tests: A re-cap of key content using a powerpoint presentation. These can be created using 10 key questions for each topic.

YouTube links: References to videos on YouTube are included in this scheme of work but no detailed links are given as these change daily. Key words which you can use to search for relevant videos or other resources are however given to ease your search and are preceded by KW.

Kagan techniques: Some key Kagan techniques are referred to within this scheme of work and these are used to empower learners to ensure they develop a key understanding of the material.

Text books: General references have been made to topic areas that can be researched using text books. There will be a range of new text books created to accommodate the changes to the specification. Therefore you will need to choose the text that is most suitable to your learners.


Scheme of work


AS Sociology (7191/1) and A-level Sociology Year 1 (7192/1)

Week 1


Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Introduction to the course and commitment tasks.

NC: distinctions between AS and A-level course.

Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity; AND social differentiation, power and stratification.

Identify commitment tasks.

Examine the course requirements and expectations.

Develop an understanding of what sociology is and key concepts.


Paper based starter: 'what is sociology?' comprehension activity.

Discuss classroom expectations and the requirements of the course.

Name game: students to remember and recall each other’s names.

Consider assessments, course structure and topics - students to look at Paper 2 of the AS (7191/2) and Paper 2 of the A-level (7192/2) in respect of the families and households questions on both papers. Students to identify the difference between the AS and A-level questions on families and households.

The main difference: AS Paper 2 has section A which involves research methods (20 marks) and families and households is one of the four topics which students must choose in Section B. Families and households has three short answer questions (10 marks in total) and 2 essay questions (30 marks in total). Whereas A-level Paper 2 has two sections and families and households comes in section A and students answer three questions only (40 marks in total). This paper includes one 10 mark question linking to an item whereas the 10 mark question on the AS Paper 2 does not link to an item.

The similarities include:

both the AS and A-level have one 10 mark ‘Outline and explain two’ question with no item

both the AS and A-level have one 20 mark ‘Applying material from an item, evaluate’ question

Identify course structure and inform students that the content for AS and A-level is the same and that you will prepare them so they can sit either the AS and/or A-level - they will practice both types of exam skills.

Re-iterate that students would only need to decide whether or not to sit AS only in February and they have plenty of time to make this decision.

Familiarise students with key topics.

Urinal game: students to explore key topics and concepts. See RB for details of this game.



Resources:

Paper based starter

Specimen Exam Papers

Urinal game powerpoint - see RB



1 hour

Introduction to the course and commitment tasks

Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification

Distinguish what sociology is.

Analyse notions of nature versus nurture.

Apply a key case study: Oxana Malaya.


Paper based starter – questions about the course structure.

Watch video on Oxana Malaya (YouTube) KW: Oxana Malaya.

Answer questions on nature versus nurture See RB: Introduction to Sociology.

Key concepts: group work, concepts and definitions on dominoes, students of mixed ability working to fit all the dominoes together - students to complete concept grid. RB: concept grid and dominoes activity.



HMWK: commitment tasks (find AQA exam papers, find the sociology section in the library, organise their file, find Sociology Review, look at college moodle and scoopit)

Resources

Paper based starter

YouTube – KW: Oxana Malaya


1 hour 30 minutes

Week 2

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Introduction to theory - functionalism

Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification.

Identify and understand what functionalism is.

Outline the key concepts associated with functionalism.

Evaluate the impact of functionalism.


Paper based starter: re-cap activity – quick check questions from commitment tasks about course structure.

Explore consensus versus conflict debate and structure versus action – link to film KW: The Adjustment Bureau. Play clip of trailer to film (YouTube) and discuss notions of free will and determinism.

Introduce functionalism and key concepts associated with the theory – linking to organic analogy and consensus approach.

Activity: Operation board game. Visual representation of body using board game. Mixed groups to receive an ‘institution card’ with information relating to institution and they have to identify which organ it relates to.

Cloze activity to re-cap functionalism – students to fill in missing gaps.

Resources

Paper based starter

YouTube – KW: Adjustment Bureau trailer

Operation board game

Close activity worksheet


1 hour

Introduction to theory - Marxism

Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification.

Identify and understand what Marxism is.

Consider the key concepts associated with Marxism.

Evaluate the impact of Marxism.


Paper based starter: word search key concepts of Marxism.

StarPower trading game: instructions given and students put into groups. KW: StarPower game to find instructions on how this game operates on the internet.

Reflect on StarPower game.

Discuss key concepts associated with Marxism: ascribed status, alienation, capitalism, means of production, bourgeoisie, proletariat.



Resources

Paper based starter

StarPower game instructions

Coloured card

Stickers

Envelopes



1 hour 30 minutes

Introduction to theory - Feminism

Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification.

Review and re-cap Marxism.

Identify and understand what feminism is.

Examine key concepts associated with feminism.


Paper based starter: cloze activity re-cap of Marxism. Unpick key terminology.

Draw a feminist: whiteboard and pens.

Powerpoint: discussion of what a feminist is and what they believe in.

Class discussion: about four different types of feminism (Marxist, difference, radical and liberal)

Everyday sexism project: link to our twitter site – students to create and take pictures of why they need feminism

Extension: students to read a series of articles about gender inequality in the UK and abroad KW: articles about general inequality. Students also to find and read about the students who tried to set up a feminist society at school (KW: Altrincham Grammar school and feminist society).



Resources

Paper based starter

Whiteboard and pens

Twitter: everyday sexism project

Articles on gender inequality


1 hour

NC: Introduction to the theory - social action.

Students must study the following two core themes socialisation, culture and identity; AND social differentiation, power and stratification.

Review consensus versus conflict debate.

Evaluate the structure versus action debate.

Outline the key components of social action theory.


Paper based starter: students complete an exercise where they match concepts and their definitions.

A3 summary sheet: three key theories overview.

Students to discuss social action perspective based on concepts of free will versus determinism.

Unpick key ideas of labelling, meaning, understanding, small scale, interactions.

Watch KW: Jane Elliott’s Blue Eyes Brown Eyes study and discuss

Identify to students that they will be asked to look at the sociology of personal life within this unit which includes the significance of individual choice in personal relationships and the significance of relationships beyond the traditional family structures.



AS Exam Technique: HMWK: students to read introductory chapter of a textbook that summarises the debate between structure versus action.

Resources

Paper based starter

A3 paper

Textbook


1 hour

Week 3

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Functionalism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Understand the different family types that exist.

Establish the key aspects of functionalism.

Identify the work of Murdock.


Paper based starter: questions on the family.

Powerpoint on the different family types (including, for example symmetrical family, beanpole, matrifocal, serial monogamy, lone-parent family).

Cards to depict different family types: students to add annotations to the cards.

Discussion: Murdock – what does universal mean?

Students to note down Murdock’s definition of the nuclear family.

Identify four key functions of the family.

Look at case studies to evaluate. For example, KW: the Nayar tribe with matriarchal family relationships.

Discuss notions of family diversity.

Questions on the whiteboard about Murdock.

Resources

Paper based starter

Powerpoint

Cards


Case studies

Questions



1 hour

Functionalism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Identify and evaluate the work of Parsons.

Examine the two functions of the family.

Understand the roles of men and women in the household.


Paper based starter: KW: warm bath theory

Warm bath: bubble bath - discussion ‘how does the family act like a warm bath?’ See TES for an example of this activity.

Powerpoint: two functions of the family and summary of Parsons

Paired task: primary socialisation and stabilisation cards – students to create definitions and compare answers to create ideal definitions.

Mind maps: expressive and instrumental leaders – what they mean and what they do?

Board work: two types of society (pre-industrial to industrial society) draw on the board and discuss what the two societies were like. Discuss industrialisation and link to the family. Students have a worksheet with the two types of society, students to write down notes off the board and draw pictures to represent the family types and the different societies. See RB for this worksheet.

Learning log: three things from the lesson. See the RB for an example of a learning log.

Resources

Paper based starter

Pots of bubble bath

Worksheet: pre-industrial and industrial society



1 hour 30 minutes

Functionalism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Review how industrialisation has changed the role of the family.

Compare and contrast Parsons and Murdock.

Evaluate both perspectives.


Paper based starter: crossword.

Discussion: exploring industrialisation and the process in which society has changed - refer to concepts geographical and social mobility.

Review concept: functional fit.

Concept Grid: complete a grid related to the discussion of whether the family has lost its functions. See the RB for an example of a blank concept grid that can be used.

Quick quiz: questions on Parsons view.

Venn diagram: developing analysis, exploring the similarities and differences between Parsons and Murdock. Hula hoops in the middle of the room, students given different coloured post-it notes.

Develop evaluation linking to Marxism, feminism, family diversity, Wilmott and Young.

Resources

Paper based starter

Questions quick quiz

Hula hoops

Post it notes

Venn diagram sheet



1 hour

Functionalism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Review functionalism.

Evaluate the functionalist theory.

Develop exam technique.


Paper based starter: series of statements provided by the teacher and students identify whether they are strengths or weaknesses of functionalism.

Students to be given information as to what both exam papers look like and how to answer the questions. Read through the assessment objectives (AO1, AO2 and AO3).



AS Exam Technique: discuss skills needed for the short answer questions.

ALL students to complete short answer questions in timed conditions: Define the term nuclear family (2 marks) Define the term expressive role (2 marks) Define the term instrumental role (2 marks).

Using one example, briefly explain how the family performs positive functions (2 marks).

Outline three functions of the family according to the functionalist view (6 marks).

Discuss requirements for the ‘Outline and explain question’ – needed for both AS and A level papers.

HMWK: outline and explain question relating to functionalism (10 marks).

Scoopit quiz available on this topic.



Resources

Paper based starter

Short answer questions

Outline and explain question



1 hour

Week 4

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

New Right

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Examine the New Right.

Discuss the New Right and their views on the family.

Evaluate the New Right.


Paper based starter: information about the New Right - comprehension activity.

Who are the New Right sheet - identifying what the different political perspectives are.

Identify similarities and differences between the New Right and functionalism (both believe the nuclear family is the ideal family type and the roles are biologically natural, the New Right however discuss how the nuclear family is in decline and discuss how the underclass has grown because of this).

Discussion: explore two key social problems (educational failure and high crime rates) and discuss how they are affected by the lack of a nuclear family.

Extension work: discussion on why the New Right recommend: all that parents must be married, mothers should stay at home and families must not receive benefits.

Evaluate New Right.

Complete concept grids of key concepts - paired definition work. See the RB for an example of a blank concept grid that can be used.

Further extension work: ask students to watch Channel 4’s Benefits street/Skint and give a review as if they were the New Right. KW: Benefits street/Skint.



Resources

Paper based starter

Political perspectives sheet

Concept grid

iPlayer/4OD - documentaries


1 hour

Marxism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Understand the Marxist approach to the family.

Explore key Marxist concepts in relation to the family.

Assess the Marxist approach.


Paper based starter: match terms on functionalism.

Quick Quiz re-cap of Marxism - linking to the StarPower game. KW: StarPower game - for details of how this game operates.

Marxism: capitalism smartie task – students to work in smartie factory, linking to means of production. See RB for details of the Capitalism Smartie Task.

Discussion: key concepts of Marxism; capitalism, bourgeoisie, prolateriat, exploitation, communism.

Students to complete lines x 20 (The bourgeoisie exploit the proletariat in a capitalist society) – link to ideology, control.

Link power and control to education and religion.

Discuss and question students about key concepts looked at.

Round the room: one key fact about Marxism.



Resources

Paper based starter

Quick quiz questions

Smarties


Instructions for Capitalism Smartie Task (see RB)

1 hour 30 minutes

Marxism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Identify and explore the work of Engels.

Examine the role of the nuclear family.

Consider the effectiveness of the work of Engels.


Paper based starter: missing gap activity to summarise Marxism.

Discuss notions of inheritance - linking to two case studies John D Rockefeller and the Du Pont Family.

Extension: research a British family that have become wealthy eg Kate Middleton's family.

Powerpoint on the differences between primitive communism and today’s society.

Blankety blank re-cap of Engels: powerpoint with words missing in a sentence – students use whiteboards to fill in the missing word. Timer and music element – students have to complete the sentence before the time runs out.

Evaluation of Engels: too economically deterministic, ignores the oppression of women, ignores family diversity.



Resources

Paper based starter

Powerpoint

Blankety blank powerpoint (See RB for an example of the powerpoint).



1 hour

Marxism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Identify and explore the work of Zaretsky and his theory of the family.

Summarise the key ideas of Zaretsky.

Evaluate the work of Zaretsky.


Paper based starter: grid of different societies and key words for students to complete independently.

Define ideology: linking to earlier activities and discuss hierarchy.

Paired activity: think of as many examples of how parents and family socialise children into accepting hierarchy and authority.

Discuss notions of the private family: behind closed doors, linking to safe haven, comparing with functionalism.

Discuss the unit of consumption function

Activity: create a sales advertisement for a product and aim it at families. Teacher to select groups and to give them a product - eg Ipad, Xbox, “Frozen” dolls. Students to vote for a product (they can’t vote for their own) and the winning team get a prize.

Evaluation: linking to feminism and functionalism, discuss economic determinism, link to family diversity.

Resources

Paper based starter

Toys for students to use to create a sales pitch


1 hour

Week 5

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Marxism

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Review Marxism and their perspectives of the family.

Compare and contrast the work of Engels and Zaretsky.

Determine the key features of Marxism.


Paper based starter: Venn diagram – Marxism versus functionalism.

Extension: why is it a Marxist or functionalist statement?

Discuss the dark side of the family.

Key word bingo: use to fill in concept grid (See RB for example of a concept grid).



AS Exam Technique: short answer question exam technique - Define the term ideology (2 marks). Using one example, briefly explain how the family performs ideological functions (2 marks). Outline three functions the family may perform according to Marxists (6 marks).

Review the skills needed for the ‘Outline and explain’ question - round the room re-cap.

Complete an essay plan that is set for the homework.

Learning log: three things from the lesson - independent learning. See RB for an example of a learning log.



HMWK: Outline and explain question relating to Marxism (10 Marks)

Extension reading: Julie Evans & Joan Chandler (2006) To Buy or Not to Buy: Family Dynamics and Children's Consumption, Sociological Research Online, (11)2.

Scoopit quiz available on this topic

Resources

Paper based starter

Powerpoint - key word bingo

Short answer questions

Essay plan

Further reading



1 hour

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Understand the feminist approach to the family.

Identify key theorists.

Demonstrate an understanding of the different types of feminism.


Paper based starter: guess the years when, for example, laws were introduced to stop discrimination in the work place based on sex, when women got the vote.

Discussion of KW: HeForShe campaign and link to Emma Watson’s talk at the UN (Youtube).

Opinion finder: four different types of feminism - students given a type of feminism and they have to find three different opinions about what that type of feminism is and what they believe.

Review of knowledge.

Radical: discussion of Firestone, Millet and Greer.

Liberal: discussion of laws.

Marxist: discussion of Ansley.

Difference: discussion of key views and use to evaluate the different perspectives.

Which type of feminist: recap, statements on the board - students to identify which type of feminist it is.

Resources

Paper based starter

YouTube – UN campaign (KW: UN HeForShe Campaign)

Opinion finder



1 hour 30 minutes

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Compare and contrast the four types.

Criticise feminism.

Explore gender roles.


Paper based starter: statements provided by teacher and students have to identify which type of feminist the statement refers to.

Question run: questions on all learnt in the last lesson - differentiation. Students have to work through a pile of questions on the teacher's table. They are given one question at a time and have to race to complete the pack of questions.

Review of all material.

Discussion: evaluation of all types of feminism.

Re-cap Parsons views of the conjugal roles - identify the difference between instrumental and expressive roles.

Explore the difference between segregated and joint conjugal roles.



Resources

Paper based starter

Question run questions and instructions


1 hour

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Summarise Parsons instrumental and expressive roles.

Identify the work of Elizabeth Bott.

Establish the changes in the family - symmetrical family.


Paper based starter: hand of knowledge (See RB for this activity).

Discussion: review and recap Parsons and the gender roles.

Discussion about the work of Bott.

Introduce Wilmott and Young – linking to the symmetrical family and the ‘new man’.

Butterfly activity: review of symmetrical family - evaluation on the back (See RB for this Butterfly activity).

Randomiser: powerpoint on speed shuffle which has key words on it – it will randomly select a student, they have to pick a key word and define it (See RB for this activity).



HMWK: Article and comprehension work: articles taken from the Sociology Review and relate directly to the topics of gender roles (archived). Teacher to create questions per article.

Resources

Paper based starter (See RB)

Butterfly sheet (See RB)

Randomiser (See RB)

Sociology Review article (Volume 23, 1st September 2013) Are we in the age of the ‘super-dad’? and the advance of women

Sociology Review article (Volume 20, 1st September 2010) The rise of the female breadwinner



1 hour

Week 6

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Recall the key aspects of the symmetrical family.

Evaluate whether the symmetrical family exists.

Review the work of Oakley and Boulton.


Paper based starter: questions to evaluate Wilmott and Young.

Powerpoint: on the work of Oakley and Boulton.

Graph work: Kagan - drawing graphs to represent Oakley and Boulton, one student in a pair to have a graph (they must not show the graph to the other student they are working with). The student with the graph instructs the student without the graph how to draw it. Student draws it on a piece of graph paper. Both students to annotate the graph to describe the patterns when they have finished.

Quick quiz recap.

Complete a summary grid of the key theories discussed – Parsons, Wilmott and Young, Oakley, Boulton. See RB for blank concept grid.

Resources

Paper based starter

Graphs

Graph paper



Pencils

Ruler


Quick check questions

1 hour

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Examine what the dual burden is.

Apply feminist views to the debate do women suffer from a dual burden.

Outline the impact of paid work on the division of labour.


Paper based starter: matched terms - match key concepts to definitions.

Discussion about dual burden: define what this is.

Discussion: roles more equal - Bott, Wilmott and Young, Gershuny, Silver and Schor.

Discussion: roles not equal (dual burden) - Edgell, Oakley, Boulton, Duncombe and Marsden, Dunne.

Mind map arguments: yes there is a dual burden versus no there isn’t.

Link to Man Yee-Khan (KW: Man Yee-Khan) who discusses how women who have a degree are now in a better position with regards to housework (they don’t have a dual burden), however, if they earn more than their husband/partner they do have a dual burden as their partner's masculinity is threatened.

Link to Arber and Ginn (KW: Arber and Ginn) who discuss how middle class women don’t have a dual burden and working class do.

Quick re-cap.



Resources

Paper based starter

A3 sheet to mind map


1 hour 30 minutes

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Review work on the dual burden.

Discuss feminist views on decision making and financial control.

Investigate the reasons why domestic violence occurs.


Paper based starter: matched theories - who said what from last lesson.

Discussion about the division of economic resources: Pahl and Edgell.

Discussion about same-sex relationships and how there has been a move towards equality of decision making and financial control within same sex couples.

AS Exam Technique: read text book information on domestic violence - discussion of different elements linking to trends/patterns shown in statistics, problems with official statistics, reasons for trends and different explanations for the trends.

Quick check questions.



Resources

Paper based starter

Text book

Questions



1 hour

Feminism and gender roles

Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society.

Review all concepts.

Develop exam technique.

Identify key skills needed for an assess question.


Paper based starter: AS Exam Technique: short answer questions - Define the term dual burden (2 marks). Using one example, briefly explain how the gender division of labour continues to exist among many couples (2 marks). Outline three reasons why the symmetrical family may have become more common over the last century (6 marks).

Sort cards key concepts: one definition per card, students given a series of cards and have to sort the definition to go with the correct key concept.

Plan the ‘Outline and explain’ question from the specimen paper (AS Sociology Paper 2 – 7191/2) ‘Outline and explain two ways in which changes to gender roles have affected diversity of family structures (10 marks) Specimen Exam Papers.

Assessment book: discuss key requirements for the ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ type of question.

Plan the question that will be set for homework.

HMWK: Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the view that the division of labour and power relationships in couples are equal in modern life (20 marks). (Specimen A-level Sociology Paper 2 (7191/2)) Both A-level and AS students will be required to complete this style question.

Scoopit quiz available on this topic



Resources

Paper based starter

Sort cards

Specimen paper

Assessment book

Essay plan



1 hour

Week 7

Topic

Specification links

Learning objectives

Learning activities

Allocated time

Social policy

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Identify what social policy is.

Recognise how policy impacts family.

Establish an understanding of key policies.


Paper based starter: questions on laws.

Discussion on policy: linking to how it affects the family, define what social policy is and what social problems are.

Examine functionalist views on policy - linking to key policies: compulsory schooling, free healthcare, right to buy and Anti-Social Behaviour Act.

Discussion: evaluate functionalist view.

Examine feminist views on policy: linking to key policies: maternity leave, custody of children, benefits.

Evaluate feminist views: linking to key policies: Equal Pay Act, benefits for lone parents, women only refuges, divorce reform act.

Students to note down key policies.

Post-it note summaries.



Resources

Paper based starter

Information sheets on each of the key perspectives and their views on policy

Post-it notes



1 hour

Social policy

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Discuss what policy is and give examples.

Identify different social policies and sociological perspectives.

Consider the merits of different perspectives.


Paper based starter: summary grid based on last lesson. RB blank concept grid.

Discussion of New Right views on policy: linking to council houses, benefits to lone parent families, benefits to unemployed people.

Evaluate the New Right perspective: differentiation

Discussion: Marxism views and New Labour

A3 summary grid of key perspectives. See RB for a blank summary grid.

Wheel of fortune re-cap: students to create eight key summary questions and write the questions on the wheel (use paper fastener to attach the arrow to the wheel). Students to spin the wheel and ask a question to their partner.

Discussion of Donzelot and the policing of families.

Students to be given a grid of key policies and they have to identify their significance.



Resources

Paper based starter

A3 paper

Wheel of fortunes printed on to card

Paper fasteners

Policy grid



1 hour 30 minutes

Social policy

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Review theory and policy.

Examine the bedroom tax and same sex marriage.

Evaluate key policies.


Paper based starter: statements of different theories.

Discussion circle surrounding key ideas and theories. A series of statements are placed in an envelope and students are sat in a circle. One student picks a statement out of the envelope and states whether they agree or disagree and why. The next student adds their opinion and then it continues round the circle. A student can ask for a new statement at any time. The idea is to be as contentious as possible with the statements

Read Sociology Review Article. Using a mind map students identify at least key points from the article.

Complete concept grid: powerpoint with key definitions on. See RB for an example of a concept grid.

Evaluate the impact of key policies.

Resources

Paper based starter

Discussion circle statements

Sociology Review Article (Volume 20, 1st September 2010)

Families and social policies powerpoint of a concept grid


1 hour

Social policy

The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies.

Review key concepts.

Develop exam technique.

Demonstrate the key requirements of an assess question.


Paper based starter: questions on exam technique for the ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question.

Plan essay for the timed assessment.



TIMED ASSESSMENT: 25 minutes: Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate question relating to social policy (20 marks)

HMWK: students to make revision materials.

Scoopit quiz available on this topic.



Resources

Paper based starter

Essay plan

Specimen Exam Papers



1 hour




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