Rubric Examples



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3 EFFECTIVE


Structure: The writer focuses and orders the material to convey a generally unified point or effect (either stated or implied).

Coherence: The writer provides movement within and between paragraphs and from beginning to end.


2 ADEQUATE


Structure: The writer provides some focus or order (either stated or implied) to the material, but the structure is somewhat unclear.

Coherence: The writer provides movement within and between paragraphs and from beginning to end, but this movement is at times either unclear or awkward.


1 INEFFECTIVE


Structure: The writer provides little or no focus or order (either stated or implied) to the material.

Coherence: The writer provides little movement within and between the paragraphs and from beginning to end.


Objective D. Student's writing will reflect format appropriate to the writing situation. Students' writing will demonstrate the use of a written or printed format appropriate to the writing situation. Format may include spelling, capitalization, footnoting/bibliography forms, graphics, or any other elements of typography or appearance.

4 OUTSTANDING
The text is clearly legible. The format is both appropriate and attractive. The writer misspells no words (or makes only a rare misspelling in a long or complex text).

3 EFFECTIVE
The text is clearly legible. The format is appropriate. The writer's misspellings are few in proportion to the length and complexity of the text.

2 ADEQUATE
The text is generally legible. The format is acceptable. The writer makes several misspellings in proportion to the length and complexity of the text.

1 INEFFECTIVE
The text is generally illegible. The format is unacceptable. The writers misspellings are frequent enough to be distracting, regardless of the length or complexity of the text.
Objective E. The student's writing will demonstrate the ability to use punctuation to establish and clarify meaning. This criterion considers the writer's use of punctuation marks as means of establishing, clarifying, and reinforcing the meaning of the sentences. All aspects of punctuation are included here, ranging from misuse and omission to more sophisticated uses which exhibit the writer's command of punctuation to convey meaning.

4 OUTSTANDING
The writer's punctuation is clear, appropriate, and purposeful. The writer consistently exhibits a command of punctuation, as indicated by the appropriate use of sophisticated or varied punctuation.

3 EFFECTIVE
The writer's punctuation is clear, appropriate, and purposeful. An occasional misuse or omission does not interfere with meaning.

2 ADEQUATE
The writer's punctuation is generally clear, appropriate, and purposeful, although misuses or omissions occasionally interfere with meaning.

1 INEFFECTIVE
The writer's misuses or omissions of punctuation frequently interfere with meaning.
Objective F. Students' writing will demonstrate the use of sentence structure to establish and clarify meaning. This criterion describes the writer's control of the elements of sentence construction to establish, clarify, and reinforce the meaning of the sentences. Concerns here include the writer's use not only of appropriate conventions of grammar and usage (e.g., subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, verb forms, etc.) but also of sentence patterns to establish relationships among ideas (e.g., coordination, subordination, parallelism).

4 OUTSTANDING


Syntax: The writer's use of clauses to establish sentence patterns consistently reinforces or emphasizes relationships among ideas.

Clarity: All parts of the sentence agree clearly and logically. The writer demonstrates a consistently good grasp of appropriate usage, grammar, and idiom. The sentences contain no misplaced words or phrases. The word order also seems deliberately and appropriately chosen for emphasis or for reinforcing the intended meaning.

Completeness: All sentences are grammatically complete.

3 EFFECTIVE


Syntax: For the most part, the writer's use of clauses to establish sentence pattern generally reinforces or emphasizes relationships among ideas.

Clarity: An isolated grammar or usage error does not obstruct clear and immediate understanding of the intended meaning. An isolated sentence contains a misplaced word or phrase, but such phrasing does not confuse the meaning.

Completeness: All sentences are grammatically complete.

2 ADEQUATE


Syntax: The writer's use of clauses to establish sentence patterns reflects relationships among idea, but connections might sometimes be inappropriate or weak.

Clarity: Grammar or usage errors may appear, but they do not seriously confuse the intended meaning. An occasional sentence contains a misplaced word or phrase, which confuses the meaning.

Completeness: Except for an isolated error, all sentences are grammatically complete.

1 INEFFECTIVE

Syntax: Few, if any, sentence patterns reflect appropriate relationships among ideas.

Clarity: Grammar or usage errors frequently confuse the intended meaning. More than an occasional sentence contain misplaced words or phrases which confuse the meaning.

Completeness: The writing exhibits more than an isolated failure to recognize the grammatical completeness of the sentence.


Objective G. Students' writing will demonstrate style, personal voice, and coherence as a communicator. Students' writing will demonstrate the writer's personal stance or voice as a communicator, which includes tone, point of view, attitude or personality. It also assesses the originality of the overall presentation, including the writer's ability to control the elements of writing to please, convince, or otherwise affect the reader.

4 OUTSTANDING
The writer's tone or general control of language consistently reflects a confident or authoritative central "voice" or "personality." Word choice is consistently precise, varied, economical or inventive. The writing clearly shows stylistic talent.

3 EFFECTIVE
The writer's tone or control of language generally reflects a confident or authoritative central "voice" or "personality ." Word choice is generally precise, varied, economical, or inventive. The writing exhibits some success at style.

2 ADEQUATE
A central "voice" or "personality" is evident, though inconsistent in minor ways. Word choice is occasionally precise, varied, economical, or inventive. Stylistic awkwardness may be evident, but is not seriously distracting.

1 INEFFECTIVE
The writer's tone or general control of language is so lacking in consistency that little central "voice" or personality" is evident. Word choice generally lacks precision, variety, economy, or inventiveness. Severe stylistic awkwardness is evident.
Objective H. Student's writing will reflect comprehension of other written texts and description, analysis, and synthesis of information and ideas appropriate to the assignment at any level.

4 OUTSTANDING
Identifies the subject very thoroughly; reflects highly developed observational skills; makes appropriate and reasonable inferences from the observations; sees relationships and relates to existing knowledge, skills or larger context.

3 EFFECTIVE
Identifies the subject well; reflects good observational skills; makes inferences which are, for the most part, reasonable and appropriate; sees relationships and relates to existing knowledge.

2 ADEQUATE
Identifies the subject clearly; shows reasonable observational skills; makes several reasonable inferences and relates to existing knowledge.

1 INEFFECTIVE
Identifies the subject somewhat; shows undeveloped observational skills; makes unreasonable or inappropriate inferences; sees most obvious relationship but does not relate to existing knowledge.




University of Arkansas, Fort Smith General Education Rubrics

Analytical Skills

http://www.uafortsmith.edu/Learning/AnalyticalSkills

Definition

Analytical / critical thinking skills include the ability to identify a concept or problem, to dissect or isolate its components, to organize information for decision making, to establish criteria for evaluation, and to draw appropriate conclusions.

Rationale

Analytical / critical thinking skills are vital for successful problem solving.

Overarching Outcome

The student will use analytical / critical thinking skills to draw conclusions and/or solve problems.



Student Behavior One

The student will identify the concept or problem with its various components.

Levels of Behavior One:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Formulate (through writing or illustration) a clear description of the problem or concept and specify its major components to be examined.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Describe (or sketch out) the problem and its components.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • List or recognize a variety of components related to the concept or problem.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Recognize that there is a problem or concept that needs to be solved.



Student Behavior Two

The student will research, organize, and prioritize information.

Levels of Behavior Two:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Select and prioritize information appropriate to solving the problem or concept.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Examine, categorize, and organize research information.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Gather research information.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • List areas to be researched.



Student Behavior Three

The student will establish criteria and propose solutions.

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Construct several proposed solutions consistent with the proposed criteria.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Prioritize the criteria and propose at least one possible solution consistent with the proposed criteria.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Evaluate the criteria and propose a solution.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Develop a criteria list.



Student Behavior Four

The student will implement and evaluate solutions.

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Select and justify the final solution to the problem.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Analyze and evaluate all assessment information.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Gather assessment information about the implemented proposed solution(s).

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Implement at least one proposed solution.



Creativity

http://www.uafortsmith.edu/Learning/Creativity

Definition

Creativity is the ability to identify and analyze creative works and processes and to synthesize ideas and materials to reach creative solutions to problems.

Rationale

The study and application of creativity facilitates learning how humans express ideas and solve problems to enhance life.

Overarching Outcome One



Students will solve real-world problems in a way that demonstrates imagination and invention.

Student Behavior 1.1

The student will define the problem.

Levels of Behavior 1.1:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently defines problem accurately.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually defines problem accurately.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Defines problem with minor omissions or errors.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Defines problem inaccurately and/or incompletely.



Student Behavior 1.2

The student will analyze components of the problem.

Levels of Behavior 1.2:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently analyzes components of the problem accurately.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually analyzes components of the problem accurately.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Analyzes components of the problem with minor omissions or errors.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Analyzes components of the problem inaccurately and/or incompletely.



Student Behavior 1.3

The student will brainstorm ideas and alternatives.

Levels of Behavior 1.3:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently able to brainstorm and identify related and realistic alternatives.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Able to brainstorm; can usually identify related and realistic alternatives.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Able to brainstorm; alternatives identified are unrelated and unrealistic.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Unable to brainstorm ideas and alternatives.



Student Behavior 1.4

The student can formulate possible solution; implement test; analyze results; and synthesize results into a form of creative expression.

Levels of Behavior 1.4:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently able to formulate possible solutions and correctly implement, analyze, and synthesize test/results.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Able to formulate possible solutions; usually able to correctly implement, analyze, and synthesize test/results.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Able to formulate possible solutions; able to implement, analyze, and synthesize test/results with minor omissions or errors.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Able to formulate possible solutions; unable to implement, analyze, and synthesize tests/results.

Overarching Outcome Two



The student will interpret the meaning of creative work(s) and effectively communicate that meaning to an appropriate audience.

Student Behavior 2.1

The student will identify and define creative work(s).

Levels of Behavior 2.1:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently able to identify and define creative work(s).

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually able to identify and define creative work(s).

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Occasionally able to identify and define creative work(s).

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Unable to identify and define creative work(s).



Student Behavior 2.2

The student will analyze component parts and processes.

Levels of Behavior 2.2:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently analyzes component parts and processes.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually analyzes component parts and processes.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Occasionally analyzes component parts and processes.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Inaccurately analyzes component parts and processes.



Student Behavior 2.3

The student will interpret and synthesize the elements of the creative work(s).

Levels of Behavior 2.3:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently able to interpret and thoroughly synthesize elements of the creative work(s).

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Able to interpret and accurately synthesize elements of the creative work(s) with few omissions.

  3. Developing Behavior

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Unable to interpret and synthesize elements of the creative work(s).



Student Behavior 2.4

The student, using a medium, will communicate the interpretation of creative works to an appropriate audience.

Levels of Behavior 2.4:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Consistently and clearly communicates the interpretation of creative works choosing an appropriate medium and audience.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually able to communicate the interpretation of creative works choosing an appropriate medium and audience.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Able to communicate the interpretation of creative works in broad terms; choice of audience and medium may be inappropriate.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Unable to communicate the interpretation of creative works to an appropriate audience without major omissions or errors.



Social Interaction

http://www.uafortsmith.edu/Learning/SocialInteraction



Definition

Social interaction is the ability to work effectively with individuals and groups.

Rationale

Teamwork and social skills are vital to success in school, work, and the community.

Outcome

Students will work effectively with individuals and groups.



Student Behavior One

Student will display personal behavior and interpersonal skills.

Levels of Behavior One:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Almost always displays empathy, self-control, friendliness, generosity, cooperation, helpfulness, and respect.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually displays empathy, self-control, friendliness, generosity, cooperation, helpfulness, and respect.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Sometimes displays empathy, self-control, friendliness, generosity, cooperation, helpfulness, and respect.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Rarely displays self-control, friendliness, cooperation, helpfulness, and respect.



Student Behavior Two

Student will accept and deliver criticism well.

Levels of Behavior Two:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Accepts and delivers criticism with compassion and confidence.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Delivers criticism with confidence, but doesn’t always accept it well.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • May deliver criticism if prompted, but doesn’t always accept it well.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Delivers criticism with sarcasm and doesn’t accept it well.



Student Behavior Three

Student will read others’ body language.

Levels of Behavior Three:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Can read others’ body language.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Can usually read others’ body language.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Can sometimes read others’ body language.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Usually ignores or fails to read others’ body language.



Student Behavior Four

Student will use conflict management techniques.

Levels of Behavior Four:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Utilizes conflict management techniques in an individual, group, or professional setting.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually utilizes conflict management techniques in an individual, group, or professional setting.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Sometimes utilizes conflict management techniques in an individual, group, or professional setting.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Rarely uses conflict management techniques in an individual, group, or professional setting.



Student Behavior Five

Student will take on task-maintenance roles.

Levels of Behavior Five:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Willingly takes on task and/or maintenance roles in a group.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Takes on task and/or maintenance roles in a group.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Usually doesn’t take on task and/or maintenance roles in a group.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Rarely participates in group activities.



Student Behavior Six

Student will use humor appropriately.

Levels of Behavior Six:

  1. Exemplary Behavior

    • Almost always uses humor in an appropriate manner.

  2. Accomplished Behavior

    • Usually uses humor in an appropriate manner.

  3. Developing Behavior

    • Sometimes uses humor, but not always in an appropriate manner.

  4. Beginning Behavior

    • Rarely uses humor in an appropriate manner.


Intentional Learning Scoring Rubric*


Learning Outcome

Below Basic

BB

Basic

B

Proficient

P

Advanced

A

Self-Aware and Self-Directed

1. Articulate their reasons for study within the context of a liberal arts education

Does not provide reasons for study or provides irrelevant or inappropriate reasons for study within a context of liberal arts education.

Provides one or more valid reasons that focus on positive impact on one of the following broad areas: the student’s personal, professional, or civic life.

Provides valid reasons that focus on positive impact on at least two of the following broad areas: the student’s personal, professional, and civic life.

Discusses a variety of valid reasons that focus on positive impact on all of the following broad areas: the student’s personal, professional, and civic life.

2. Describe, evaluate, and improve their own learning processes

Does not address all three aspects of this outcome (describe, evaluate, and improve) or focuses only on memorization of isolated facts.

Identifies more than one learning strategy and goes beyond memorization of isolated facts, but concentrates on learning within specific courses and/or provides minimal discussion related to evaluation and improvement.

Identifies a variety of learning strategies and when they are most effective. Describes strategies for improving learning. The response goes beyond specific courses, suggesting awareness that learning is a life-long activity and/or that learning involves making connections across contexts.

Response has all the characteristics indicating proficiency, plus demonstrates sophisticated development of learning skills that are broadly applicable in and out of the classroom and that involve making connections across contexts, such as connecting academic learning to personal or professional experiences.

3. Develop plans for pursuing learning goals

Does not provide a plan to pursue learning goals or describes a plan that focuses on memorization of isolated facts.

Provides a plan that goes beyond memorization of isolated facts, but the plan lacks sufficient detail to make effective learning likely.

Provides a plan that is likely to result in effective learning. The plan addresses at least one major issue, such as:

  • time management

  • use of learning skills refined through personal experience

  • need to monitor learning and possibly adapt the plan

  • need to make connections across contexts

Provides a plan that is likely to result in effective learning, as well as sophisticated discussion of at least two major issues, such as:

  • time management

  • use of learning skills refined through personal experience

  • need to monitor learning and possibly adapt the plan

  • need to make connections across contexts

4. Set, pursue, and reflect upon their learning goals

Does not address all three aspects of this outcome: setting, pursuing, and reflecting on learning goals.


Addresses setting, pursuing, and reflecting on learning goals, but the response suggests need for external support from family members, friends, teachers, or others to initiate and/or complete at least one of these processes.

Addresses setting, pursuing, and reflecting on learning goals in sufficient detail to suggest self-reliant learning.

Addresses setting, pursuing, and reflecting on important learning goals and indicates routine, on-going reflection and flexibility in revising short- and long-term goals and/or learning strategies.

Multiple Perspectives

5. Identify diverse or conflicting concepts, viewpoints, and/or priorities
(revised May 2008)

Does not identify diverse or conflicting concepts, viewpoints, or priorities or identifies conflicts that are irrelevant to the situation being addressed.

Identifies at least two diverse or conflicting concepts, viewpoints, or priorities in the situation being addressed, but does not elaborate in sufficient detail to demonstrate clear understanding and/or does not identify obvious conflicts.

Identifies major diverse or conflicting concepts, viewpoints, or priorities present in the situation being addressed.

Identifies major diverse or conflicting concepts, viewpoints, or priorities present in the situation being addressed, as well as subtle nuances and complexities.

6. Articulate the value of considering multiple perspectives

Does not articulate the value of considering multiple perspectives.


Recognizes that others’ opinions and viewpoints have value, but shows lack of discrimination or analysis, as if all perspectives are always equally valid or as if one’s own perspective is always superior.

Demonstrates the value of multiple perspectives and recognizes that one’s own perspective is not always superior and that all perspectives may not be equally valid.

Response has all the characteristics indicating proficiency, plus explores the processes of evaluating conflicting perspectives and/or demonstrates a commitment to seek out dissenting viewpoints.

7. Examine phenomena from multiple viewpoints.
(revised May 2008)

Considers the phenomenon from one perspective or consistently favors a single perspective

Examines at least two perspectives.

Examines multiple perspectives and identifies some relevant commonalities and conflicts.

Examines the phenomenon from multiple viewpoints and explores subtle nuances and complexities among the viewpoints and/or provides sophisticated discussion evaluating their relative merit.

Make Connections

8. See connections in seemingly disparate information

Does not identify connections or focuses on invalid connections.

Identifies valid connections, but tends to focus on the obvious, such as connecting related disciplines.

Identifies valid connections that go beyond the obvious.

Identifies valid connections that are subtle, sophisticated, and/or creative and discusses insights or implications based on these observations.

9. Recognize links among topics and concepts presented in different courses

Does not identify links or identifies invalid links among topics and concepts presented in different courses.

Identifies valid links among topics and concepts in different courses, but tends to focus on the obvious or does not fully explain the nature of the links.

Identifies valid links among topics and concepts presented in different courses, goes beyond the obvious, and explains the nature of the links.

Identifies valid links that are subtle, sophisticated, and/or creative and discusses insights or implications associated with the links.


10. Synthesizes disparate facts, theories, and concepts

Does not synthesize disparate facts, theories, and concepts or provides an invalid synthesis.

Provides a valid synthesis, but does not explicitly address major relevant aspects of the disparate information.

Provides a valid synthesis that explicitly addresses major aspects of the disparate information.

Provides a valid synthesis that explicitly identifies sophisticated or creative connections involving subtle nuances and complexities in the disparate information.

11. Work within a context of diverse and conflicting concepts, viewpoints, and/or priorities (revised May 2008)

Does not propose a strategy, or proposes irrelevant or unreasonable strategy(ies) for this situation.

Proposes simplistic or undeveloped strategy(ies) for working within this situation.

Describes reasonable strategy(ies) for working within this situation.

Describes creative, sophisticated strategy(ies) for working within this situation.

Apply Skills and Knowledge to Different Contexts

12. Adapt what is learned in one situation to problems encountered in another

Does not adapt what is learned in one situation to problems in another situation or describes an invalid adaptation.

Describes a valid adaptation, but the solution relies on concrete similarities between the two contexts.

Describes a valid adaptation that goes beyond concrete similarity between the two contexts.

Describes a creative and/or sophisticated adaptation that has the potential for developing more effective solutions or new insights about the problem being addressed.

13. Connect intellectual study to personal life

Does not connect intellectual study to personal life or describes invalid connections.

Describes valid connections between intellectual study and personal life, but the connections rely on concrete similarities between the two contexts.

Describes valid connections between intellectual study and personal life that go beyond concrete similarity between the two contexts.

Describes creative and/or sophisticated connections between intellectual study and personal life that lead to new insights or behaviors.

14. Draw on a wide range of knowledge to make decisions

Does not present a decision, does not provide the rationale for a decision, or relies on one line of information to make a decision.

Makes a decision based on a narrow range of knowledge, perhaps applying ideas from a single course or discipline or from closely-connected disciplines.

Makes a reasonable decision based on more than a narrow range of knowledge.

Makes a creative or particularly effective decision based on sophisticated integration of ideas from a wide range of knowledge.

*Developed with support from a Teagle Foundation grant. Retrieved January 4, 2008 from Report on First Year at http://www.roanoke.edu/teagle. Updates added in May 2008 during Teagle project meeting.



Group Participation Rubric
Retrieved February 12, 2008 from Making the Grade: The Role of Assessment in Authentic Learning by Marilyn M. Lombardi, http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI3019.pdf


Criteria

Distinguished

Proficient

Basic

Unacceptable

Workload

Did a full share of the work—or more; knows what needs to be done and does it; volunteers to help others.

Did an equal share of the work; does work when asked; works hard most of the time.

Did almost as much work as others; seldom asks for help.

Did less work than others; doesn’t get caught up after absence; doesn’t ask for help.

Getting Organized

Took the initiative proposing meeting times and getting group organized.

Worked agreeably with partner(s) concerning times and places to meet.

Could be coaxed into meeting with other partner(s).

Did not meet partner(s) at agreed times and places.

Participation in Discussions

Provided many good ideas for the unit development; inspired others; clearly communicated desires, ideas, personal needs, and feelings.

Participated in discussions; shared feelings and thoughts.

Listened mainly; on some occasions, made suggestions.

Seemed bored with conversations about the unit; rarely spoke up, and ideas were off the mark.

Meeting Deadlines

Completed assigned work ahead of time.

Completed assigned work on time.

Needed some reminding; work was late but it didn’t impact grade.

Needed much reminding; work was late and it did impact quality of work or grade.

Showing up for Meetings Score

Showed up for meetings punctually, sometimes ahead of time.

Showed up for meetings on time.

Showed up late, but it wasn’t a big problem for completing work.

No show or extremely late; feeble or no excuse offered.

Providing Feedback Score

Habitually provides dignified, clear, and respectful feedback.

Gave feedback that did not offend.

Provided some feedback; sometimes hurt feelings of others with feedback or made irrelevant comments.

Was openly rude when giving feedback.

Receiving Feedback Score

Graciously accepted feedback.

Accepted feedback.

Reluctantly accepted feedback.

Refused to listen to feedback.




Design Project Assessment Rubric


Course No.:




Date:
















Team/Student:




Reviewer:






Topic

(Weight)

Unacceptable

(0)

Marginal

(1)

Acceptable

(2)

Exceptional

(3)

Points

Design Problem and Boundaries
(1)

Little or no grasp of problem. Incapable of producing a successful solution.

Some understanding of problem. Major deficiencies that will impact the quality of solution.

Overall sound understanding of the problem and constraints. Does not significantly impair solution.

Clear and complete understanding of design goal and constraints.




Alternative Designs
(2)

Only one design presented or clearly infeasible alternative given.

Serious deficiencies in exploring and identifying alternative designs.

Alternative approaches identified to some degree.

Final design achieved after review of reasonable alternatives.




Use of Computer–Aided Tools
(2)

Serious deficiencies in understanding the correct selection and/or use of tools.

Minimal application and use of appropriate tools.

Computer–aided tools used with moderate effectiveness to develop designs.

Computer–aided tools are used effectively to develop and analyze designs.




Application of Engineering Principles
(2)

No or erroneous application of engineering principles yielding unreasonable solution.

Serious deficiencies in proper selection and use of engineering principles.

Effective application of engineering principles resulting in reasonable solution.

Critical selection and application of engineering principles ensuring reasonable results.




Final Design
(3)

Not capable of achieving desired objectives.
No implementation of resource conservation and recycle strategies.

Barely capable of achieving desired objectives.
Minimal utilization of resource conservation and recycle potentials.

Design meets desired objectives.
Moderately effective utilization of resource conservation and recycle potentials.

Design meets or exceeds desired objectives.
Effective implementation of resource conservation and recycle strategies.




Process Economics
(1)

No or totally erroneous cost estimates presented.

Reasonable cost estimates presented, but no profitability analysis included.

Reasonable profitability analysis presented, but no interpretation of the results.

Effective use of profitability analysis leading to improvement recommendations.




Interpretation of Results
(2)

No or erroneous conclusions based on achieved results.

Serious deficiencies in support for stated conclusions.

Sound conclusions reached based on achieved results.

Insightful, supported conclusions and recommendations.




OVERALL

PERFORMANCE

Unacceptable

Marginal

Acceptable

Exceptional

TOTAL

POINTS REQUIRED

0–9

10–19

20–29

30–39



*Rubric shared by Connie M. Schroeder, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee on the POD listserv, April 14, 2008.





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