Review Guide Semester I exam English 9a terms to know



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Review Guide

Semester I Exam

English 9A
Terms to know (define; *be able to identify example)


thesis statement

idea


example (types)*

explanation

genres

denotation*



connotation*

attributive tag

explanatory phrase

plot


exposition

rising action

falling action

climax


resolution

point of view

narrator (three types)

characterization (4 methods)*

protagonist

antagonist

flat character

round character

static character*

dynamic character*

conflict (five types)*

setting


theme

tone


mood

foreshadowing

flashback

satire*


irony

concrete poem*

alliteration*

onomatopoeia*

assonance*

consonance*

rhyme

rhyme scheme*



stanza

line


enjambment

speaker


sonnet (2 types)

imagery*


metaphor*

simile*


personification*

symbol


allusion


Grammar:


  • Commas, dashes, hyphens, parentheses, colons

  • Underlining vs. quotations

  • Semi-colons/subordinating conjunctions

  • Three levels of transitions

  • Frequently confused words


Texts to know:


“The Flowers”

“The Sniper”

“Love on the Rocks”

“The Most Dangerous Game”

“A Sound of Thunder”

“All Summer in a Day”

“Possibility of Evil”

“Reapers”

“Death of a Naturalist”

“Harlem”


“Metaphor”

“Slam, Dunk and Hook”

“Dulce et Decorum Est”

“One Perfect Rose”



“Fifteen”

To Kill a Mockingbird

Questions for review:


  1. How do the idea, the example, and the explanation fit into the writing of a well-developed paragraph?

  2. What are the six ways in which a poet creates meaning in a poem? Be prepared to explain referring to the poems we studied in class.

  3. Which protagonists are dynamic? Do we have any static protagonists? Give evidence for your choice.

  4. Give examples of each type of narrator from the texts we’ve read.

  5. Be able to identify different types of conflict and give examples from the stories we’ve read.

  6. How does setting play a role in the development of a narrative – novel, poem, or short story?

  7. What are the main themes of To Kill A Mockingbird?

  8. Be prepared to define irony and explain how it functions in: “Most Dangerous Game”; “Sound of Thunder”; “One Perfect Rose”; To Kill a Mockingbird.

  9. Be prepared to perform a close reading of a poem. What do you look at first? How do you annotate a poem? How do you draw all the information together?



Thesis statements for a multi-paragraph impromptu essay: (two will appear on your test; be prepared to answer one)
In To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout/Jem is the protagonist because his/her actions drive the plot and s/he undergoes the most change.
Losing one’s innocence is an inevitable part of life. Is there a common lesson we learn in those “coming of age” moments? Show how this life lesson/theme is developed in any three of the following works: “The Flowers,” “All Summer in a Day”, “Death of A Naturalist,” “Fifteen,” To Kill A Mockingbird
“All that glitters is not gold” – or, in other words, you can’t judge a book by its cover. Explain how this is true in any three of the following works: To Kill a Mockingbird, “Death of a Naturalist”, “Love on the Rocks”, or “Possibility of Evil.”
Contrast the attitudes toward using violence to solve problems in “The Sniper”, “Dulce Et Decorum Est”, and To Kill a Mockingbird.

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