Psych 306 Psychology of Gender Spring 2018 Section 001: 270 kmbl on m w from 9: 20 am 11: 50 am Instructor/ta info Instructor Information



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PSYCH 306 - Psychology of Gender

Spring 2018

Section 001: 270 KMBL on M W from 9:20 am - 11:50 am

Instructor/TA Info

Instructor Information

Name: Dawn-Marie Wood

Office Location: 1007 KMBL

Office Phone: 801-422-0374

Office Hours: Mon, Wed 12:00pm-12:50pm
Or By Appointment

Email: dawn-marie.wood@byu.edu

TA Information

Name: Whitney Beech

Office Location: 1053 JFSB

Office Hours: Tue 4:00pm-5:00pm
Or By Appointment

Email: whitneybeech@gmail.com

Course Information

Description

Biological and social contributions to sex role development, sexual self-concept, and complementarity of sex roles.



Prerequisites

PSYCH 307PSYCH 309, and PSYCH 310; or instructor's consent.

Learning Outcomes

1. Gender concepts, theories, and research findings

Students will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of (a) various concepts and theories of sex and gender, including models of how gender roles are developed and maintained, and (b) the major research findings regarding gender.



Measurement: Multiple choice tests, short essays.

2. Research knowledge and skills

Students will develop knowledge and skills within gender research for identifying and formulating research hypotheses and the theories supporting them, understanding threats to research validity, formulating designs to test hypotheses, appreciating the limitations of research findings, and critically analyzing the research literature.



Measurement: Writing assignment and/or conducting research project.

3. Develop skills in gender research

Students will develop knowledge and skills within gender research for identifying and formulating research hypotheses and the theories supporting them, understanding threats to research validity, formulating designs to test hypotheses, appreciating the limitations of research findings, and critically analyzing the research literature.



Measurement: Writing assignment.

4. Critical awareness of cultural effects on gender identity

Students will be aware of, identify with, and analyze the influence of media, institutions and culture on the development of gender identity, gender-related beliefs, and attitudes through class room activities and discussions; and develop an awareness of one's own expectations and biases as they relate to gender.



Measurement: Multiple choice tests, short essays, and/or conducting research project.

5. Influence of media, institutions, and culture

Students will be aware of, identify with, and analyze the influence of media, institutions and culture on the development of gender identity, gender-related beliefs, and attitudes through class room activities and discussions; and develop an awareness of one's own expectations and biases as they relate to gender.



Measurement: Writing assignment.

Materials




Item

Price (new)

Price (used)







PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Required
by HELGESON, V

168.95

126.75

Participation Policy

Course participation (five attendance points) will be earned each class period, beginning Monday, May 7, via circulation of an in-class roll. These points may not be "made up" (you must be physically present to earn them); however, an extra credit opportunity is available (see below).

Attendance: 12 days x 5 points each day = 60 attendance points possible

In addition, the following weekly expectations establish a predictable routine for participation in this course:



Mondays: Online submission of a weekly Reading Response (uploaded to Learning Suite by 9 a.m.) = 20 points each
Wednesdays: In-class completion of a weekly Key Terms Quiz (taken at the beginning of class) = 10 points each
Fridays (NO CLASS): Online submission of a weekly "Do Gender" Research Experience Write-Up (uploaded to Learning Suite by 5 p.m.) = 30 points each

Exams2 exams x 100 points each = 200 points possible

Extra Credit Opportunity15 points possible (due on the last day of class)

Gender Project Literature Review100 points possible (due on the last day of finals)

Grading Policy

To receive full credit, assignments are due on the dates indicated. Failure to submit by the deadlines will result in a lower grade; five points less than the total possible if within three days10 points less than full credit if within five days, and 15 points less than the maximum if more than seven days late (assignments submitted more than two weeks past the original due date will not be accepted). Late submissions of the final Gender Project Literature Review will not be accepted, as it is due at 11:59 p.m. on the last day of finals (Thursday, June 21).



NOTE: Key Terms Quizzes may not be made up, but your lowest quiz score will be dropped.

Final Grade: Please note that an overall percentage of 92.9999% (as you see it in Learning Suite) is still an A- and will not be rounded up. Please do not ask me to arbitrarily round up your grade to the next higher grade. I have included an extra-credit opportunity, which should help you even out a lower-than-anticipated assignment, quiz, or exam score. And, remember that your lowest Key Terms Quiz score will be dropped at the end of the term.

Grading Scale

Grades

Percent

A

93%

A-

90%

B+

87%

B

83%

B-

80%

C+

77%

C

73%

C-

70%

D+

67%

D

63%

D-

60%

E

0%

Assignments

Assignment Descriptions

Reading Response: Chapter 1 (pp. 1-32)

May

07

Due: Monday, May 07 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 1

May

09

Due: Wednesday, May 09 at 11:00 am

pp. 31-32

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 1

May

11

Due: Friday, May 11 at 5:00 pm

1.3 "Life as the Other Sex"

See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Reading Response: Chapter 2 (pp. 36-72)

May

14

Due: Monday, May 14 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 2

May

16

Due: Wednesday, May 16 at 11:00 am

p. 72

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 2

May

18

Due: Friday, May 18 at 5:00 pm



Choose one of the following:

2.1 "Comparing Media Reports to Scientific Reports"


2.3 "Gender-Role Strain"

See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Reading Response: Chapter 3 (pp. 76-115)

May

21

Due: Monday, May 21 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 3

May

23

Due: Wednesday, May 23 at 11:00 am

pp. 114-115

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 3

May

25

Due: Friday, May 25 at 5:00 pm

3.5 "Stereotypes Obtained from Media Portrayals of Men and Women"

See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Exam 1 (Chapters 1 - 3)

May

26

Due: Saturday, May 26 at 1:00 pm



Reading Response: Chapter 4 (pp. 121-154)

May

28

Due: Monday, May 28 at 11:59 pm



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 4

May

30

Due: Wednesday, May 30 at 11:00 am

pp. 153-154

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 4

Jun

01

Due: Friday, Jun 01 at 5:00 pm



Choose one of the following:

4.1 "Sex Comparisons in Directions"



See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Reading Response: Chapter 5 (pp. 161-217)

Jun

04

Due: Monday, Jun 04 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 5

Jun

06

Due: Wednesday, Jun 06 at 11:00 am

pp. 216-217

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 5

Jun

08

Due: Friday, Jun 08 at 5:00 pm



Choose one of the following:

5.4 "How Are Females and Males Portrayed in Children's Books?"


5.6 "How Children Determine Gender"

See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Reading Response: Chapter 6 (pp. 226-270)

Jun

11

Due: Monday, Jun 11 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 6

Jun

13

Due: Wednesday, Jun 13 at 11:00 am

pp. 269-270

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 6

Jun

15

Due: Friday, Jun 15 at 5:00 pm



Choose one of the following:

6.2 "Reasons for Switching from Nontraditional to Traditional Majors"


6.3 "Self-Conceptions"

See assignment description and scoring rubric under the Content tab, Assignment Helps.

Reading Response: Chapter 7 (pp. 278-321)

Jun

18

Due: Monday, Jun 18 at 9:00 am



Compose a one-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted "reflective essay" using free-form writing style (first person is acceptable) in response to the assigned reading.

NOTE: Please do NOT include a title page or header of any kind (just one full page of text). A References page is not required (our textbook is the assumed source), but when quoting the textbook directly, please include a page number within an in-text citation, per APA format (i.e., Helgeson, 2017, p. 1).

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the reading] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (Hacker & Sommers, p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 7

Jun

18

Due: Monday, Jun 18 at 11:00 am

pp. 320-321

Attendance Points

Jun

18

Due: Monday, Jun 18 at 11:59 pm



Course participation (attendance points) will be earned each class period, beginning Monday, May 7, via circulation of an in-class roll. These points may not be "made up" (you must be physically present to earn them); however, an extra credit opportunity is available.

12 days x 5 points each day = 60 attendance points possible

"That We May Be One" (Tom Christofferson's Journey)

Jun

18

Due: Monday, Jun 18 at 11:59 pm

Watch the documentary "That We May Be One" (Tom Christofferson's Journey), and submit a two-page, double-spaced reflective essay in APA format via Learning Suite.

Access the documentary here: https://www.ksl.com/?sid=46175330&nid=1016

"A reflective essay is personal writing, usually to explore the ways in which an experience [in this case, your experience with the documentary] shaped your understanding of an issue or a topic in your discipline" (p. 6).

Hacker & Sommers (2016). APA Version: A pocket style manual. New York, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.



Exam 2 (Chapters 4 - 7)

Jun

20

Due: Wednesday, Jun 20 at 10:50 am



Gender Project: Literature Review

Jun

21

Due: Thursday, Jun 21 at 11:59 pm

Please locate a minimum of six references (at least three of which must be peer-reviewed, scientific journal articles) on the gender topic of your choice, and write a five-page, double-spaced, APA-formatted, persuasive literature review supporting the stance taken in your thesis statement (i.e., evidence from the literature should provide the rationale for this paper’s position). A title page (with running head), introduction, section headings, conclusion, and references section should also be included. (NOTE: The title page and references section do not count toward the minimum length requirement, and no abstract is required for this assignment.) Remember that the literature review must adhere to APA format throughout.

Gender Project_Literature Review (Scoring Rubric).pdf  Download 

University Policies



Respectful Environment

"Sadly, from time to time, we do hear reports of those who are at best insensitive and at worst insulting in their comments to and about others... We hear derogatory and sometimes even defamatory comments about those with different political, athletic, or ethnic views or experiences. Such behavior is completely out of place at BYU, and I enlist the aid of all to monitor carefully and, if necessary, correct any such that might occur here, however inadvertent or unintentional. "I worry particularly about demeaning comments made about the career or major choices of women or men either directly or about members of the BYU community generally. We must remember that personal agency is a fundamental principle and that none of us has the right or option to criticize the lawful choices of another." President Cecil O. Samuelson, Annual University Conference, August 24, 2010 "Occasionally, we ... hear reports that our female faculty feel disrespected, especially by students, for choosing to work at BYU, even though each one has been approved by the BYU Board of Trustees. Brothers and sisters, these things ought not to be. Not here. Not at a university that shares a constitution with the School of the Prophets." Vice President John S. Tanner, Annual University Conference, August 24, 2010



Honor Code

In keeping with the principles of the BYU Honor Code, students are expected to be honest in all of their academic work. Academic honesty means, most fundamentally, that any work you present as your own must in fact be your own work and not that of another. Violations of this principle may result in a failing grade in the course and additional disciplinary action by the university. Students are also expected to adhere to the Dress and Grooming Standards. Adherence demonstrates respect for yourself and others and ensures an effective learning and working environment. It is the university's expectation, and every instructor's expectation in class, that each student will abide by all Honor Code standards. Please call the Honor Code Office at 422-2847 if you have questions about those standards.



Academic Honesty

The first injunction of the Honor Code is the call to "be honest." Students come to the university not only to improve their minds, gain knowledge, and develop skills that will assist them in their life's work, but also to build character. "President David O. McKay taught that character is the highest aim of education" (The Aims of a BYU Education, p.6). It is the purpose of the BYU Academic Honesty Policy to assist in fulfilling that aim. BYU students should seek to be totally honest in their dealings with others. They should complete their own work and be evaluated based upon that work. They should avoid academic dishonesty and misconduct in all its forms, including but not limited to plagiarism, fabrication or falsification, cheating, and other academic misconduct.



Plagiarism

Intentional plagiarism is a form of intellectual theft that violates widely recognized principles of academic integrity as well as the Honor Code. Such plagiarism may subject the student to appropriate disciplinary action administered through the university Honor Code Office, in addition to academic sanctions that may be applied by an instructor. Inadvertent plagiarism, which may not be a violation of the Honor Code, is nevertheless a form of intellectual carelessness that is unacceptable in the academic community. Plagiarism of any kind is completely contrary to the established practices of higher education where all members of the university are expected to acknowledge the original intellectual work of others that is included in their own work. In some cases, plagiarism may also involve violations of copyright law. Intentional Plagiarism-Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words, ideas, or data of another as one's own without providing proper attribution to the author through quotation, reference, or footnote. Inadvertent Plagiarism-Inadvertent plagiarism involves the inappropriate, but non-deliberate, use of another's words, ideas, or data without proper attribution. Inadvertent plagiarism usually results from an ignorant failure to follow established rules for documenting sources or from simply not being sufficiently careful in research and writing. Although not a violation of the Honor Code, inadvertent plagiarism is a form of academic misconduct for which an instructor can impose appropriate academic sanctions. Students who are in doubt as to whether they are providing proper attribution have the responsibility to consult with their instructor and obtain guidance. Examples of plagiarism include: Direct Plagiarism-The verbatim copying of an original source without acknowledging the source. Paraphrased Plagiarism-The paraphrasing, without acknowledgement, of ideas from another that the reader might mistake for the author's own. Plagiarism Mosaic-The borrowing of words, ideas, or data from an original source and blending this original material with one's own without acknowledging the source. Insufficient Acknowledgement-The partial or incomplete attribution of words, ideas, or data from an original source. Plagiarism may occur with respect to unpublished as well as published material. Copying another student's work and submitting it as one's own individual work without proper attribution is a serious form of plagiarism.



Student Disability

Brigham Young University is committed to providing a working and learning atmosphere that reasonably accommodates qualified persons with disabilities. If you have any disability which may impair your ability to complete this course successfully, please contact the University Accessibility Center (UAC), 2170 WSC or 422-2767. Reasonable academic accommodations are reviewed for all students who have qualified, documented disabilities. The UAC can also assess students for learning, attention, and emotional concerns. Services are coordinated with the student and instructor by the UAC. If you need assistance or if you feel you have been unlawfully discriminated against on the basis of disability, you may seek resolution through established grievance policy and procedures by contacting the Equal Employment Office at 422-5895, D-285 ASB.



Mental Health Concerns

Mental health concerns and stressful life events can affect students’ academic performance and quality of life. BYU Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS, 1500 WSC, 801-422-3035, caps.byu.edu) provides individual, couples, and group counseling, as well as stress management services. These services are confidential and are provided by the university at no cost for full-time students. For general information please visit https://caps.byu.edu; for more immediate concerns please visit http://help.byu.edu.



Sexual Misconduct

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Brigham Young University prohibits unlawful sex discrimination against any participant in its education programs or activities. The university also prohibits sexual harassment-including sexual violence-committed by or against students, university employees, and visitors to campus. As outlined in university policy, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking are considered forms of "Sexual Misconduct" prohibited by the university.

University policy requires all university employees in a teaching, managerial, or supervisory role to report all incidents of Sexual Misconduct that come to their attention in any way, including but not limited to face-to-face conversations, a written class assignment or paper, class discussion, email, text, or social media post. Incidents of Sexual Misconduct should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator at t9coordinator@byu.edu or (801) 422-8692. Reports may also be submitted through EthicsPoint at https://titleix.byu.edu/report or 1-888-238-1062 (24-hours a day).

BYU offers confidential resources for those affected by Sexual Misconduct, including the university's Victim Advocate, as well as a number of non-confidential resources and services that may be helpful. Additional information about Title IX, the university's Sexual Misconduct Policy, reporting requirements, and resources can be found at http://titleix.byu.edu or by contacting the university's Title IX Coordinator.



Schedule

Date

Column 1

Column 2

Week 1

W May 02 Wednesday

Personal Information Sheets

Overview of Course






Week 2

M May 07 Monday

Chapter 1: Introduction

Reading Response: Chapter 1 (pp. 1-32)




W May 09 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 1




F May 11 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 1




Week 3

M May 14 Monday

Reading Response: Chapter 2 (pp. 36-72)

Chapter 2: Methods and History of Gender Research

"Gender Roles and 'The Family: A Proclamation to the World'" Presentation


Guest Presenter:
Julie Haupt, M.S. (BYU School of Family Life Instructor)

W May 16 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 2

"Finding My Place in the Kingdom" Presentation



Guest Presenter:
Ben Schilaty, Ph.D. (BYU Spanish Instructor and MSW Student, Blog Author)

F May 18 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 2




Week 4

M May 21 Monday

Reading Response: Chapter 3 (pp. 76-115)

Chapter 3: Gender-Role Attitudes






W May 23 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 3




Th May 24 Thursday

Exam 1 (Chapters 1 - 3) Opens




F May 25 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 3

Exam #1: Chapters 1-3 (in Testing Center Thursday through Saturday)






Sa May 26 Saturday

Exam #1: Chapters 1-3 (in Testing Center Thursday through Saturday)

Exam 1 (Chapters 1 - 3) Closes




Week 5

M May 28 Monday

Memorial Day

Reading Response: Chapter 4 (pp. 121-154)

Chapter 4: Sex-Related Comparisons (Observations)






W May 30 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 4




F Jun 01 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 4




Week 6

M Jun 04 Monday

Reading Response: Chapter 5 (pp. 161-217)

Chapter 5: Sex-Related Comparisons (Theory)






W Jun 06 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 5




F Jun 08 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 5




Week 7

M Jun 11 Monday

Reading Response: Chapter 6 (pp. 226-270)

Chapter 6: Achievement






W Jun 13 Wednesday

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 6




F Jun 15 Friday

"Do Gender" Research: Chapter 6




Week 8

M Jun 18 Monday

Reading Response: Chapter 7 (pp. 278-321)

Key Terms Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 7: Communication



Attendance Points

"That We May Be One" (Tom Christofferson's Journey)




T Jun 19 Tuesday

Spring Exam Preparation (06/19/2018 - 06/19/2018)




W Jun 20 Wednesday

First Day of Spring Final Exams (06/20/2018 - 06/21/2018)

Exam #2: Chapters 4-7

Final Exam:

270 KMBL


9:00am - 10:50am

Exam 2 (Chapters 4 - 7)




Th Jun 21 Thursday

Gender Project: Literature Review





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