Program Assessment



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Citing Information


Sources are not cited properly.

MLA format is followed although several errors are apparent.

MLA format is followed. Student lists most of the components in correct form.

MLA format is exact. No errors are evident.

Reflecting on Research

Student is disorganized, does not have a research strategy and does not use time effectively.

Student needs considerable teacher help to organize research. Some steps are missing in the plan.

Student works within the time frame and develops a system to organize information. Requires some teacher help.

Time management skills are excellent. Student develops a clear method to organize information and makes revisions in plan when needed.

*Retrieved December 30, 2006 from http://www.csd99.k12.il.us/NORTH/library/PDF/researchRubric.pdf

Greece Central School District English Language Arts Persuasive Writing Rubric


SKILL

AREA

6

Responses at this level:

5

Responses at this level:

4

Responses at this level:

3

Responses at this level:

2

Responses at this level:

1

Responses at this level:

Meaning: the extent to which the writing exhibits sound understanding, analysis, and explanation, of the writing task and text(s)


 convey an accurate and in-depth understanding of the topic, audience, and purpose for the writing task

 offer insightful and thorough analysis and explanation in support of the argument or position



 convey an accurate and complete understanding of the topic, audience, and purpose for the writing task

 offer clear and explicit analysis and explanation in support of the argument or position



 convey an accurate although somewhat basic understanding of the topic, audience, and purpose for the writing task

 offer partial analysis and explanation in support of the argument or position



 convey a partly accurate understanding of the topic, audience, and purpose of the writing task

 offer limited analysis or superficial explanation that only partially support the argument or position



 convey a confused or largely inaccurate understanding of the topic, audience, and purpose for the writing task

 offer unclear analysis or unwarranted explanations that fail to support the argument or position



 provide no evidence of understanding the writing task or topic

 make incoherent explanations that do not support the argument or position



Development: the extent to which ideas are elaborated using specific and relevant details and/or evidence to support the thesis

 support the position clearly and fully with arguments that effectively integrate and elaborate on specific ideas and textual evidence from a variety of sources

 effectively anticipate and convincingly refute opposing view points



 support the position clearly and consistently with arguments that incorporate and explain ideas and specific textual evidence from a variety of sources

 anticipate and somewhat convincingly refute opposing viewpoints



 support the position with arguments that use ideas and relevant textual evidence from a variety of sources

 anticipate and attempt to refute opposing viewpoints at a basic level




 support the position partially, using some ideas and textual evidence but without much elaboration or from limited sources

 partially anticipate and with a limited or confused attempt to refute opposing viewpoints but



 attempt to support the position, but textual ideas and evidence is vague, repetitive, or unjustified

 allude to opposing viewpoints but make no attempt to refute them



 completely lack development and do not include textual evidence

 make no attempt to anticipate or refute opposing viewpoints



Organization: the extent to which the writing establishes a clear thesis and maintains direction, focus, and coherence

 skillfully establish and maintain consistent focus on a clear and compelling thesis

 exhibit logical and coherent structure with claims, evidence and interpretations that convincingly support the thesis

 make skillful use of transition words and phrases


 effectively establish and maintain consistent focus on a clear thesis

 exhibit a logical sequence of claims, evidence, and interpretations to support the thesis

 make effective use of transition words and phrases


 establish and maintain focus on a clear thesis

 exhibit a logical sequence of claims, evidence, and interpretations but ideas within paragraphs may be inconsistently organized

 make some attempt to use basic transition words and phrases


 establish but fail to consistently maintain focus on a basic thesis

 exhibit a basic structure but lack the coherence of consistent claims, evidence, and interpretations

 make an inconsistent attempt to use some basic transition words or phrases


 establish a confused or irrelevant thesis and fail to maintain focus

 exhibit an attempt to organize ideas into a beginning, middle, and end, but lack coherence

 make little attempt to use transition words and phrases


 fail to include a thesis or maintain focus

 complete lack of organization and coherence

 make no attempt to use transition words or phrases


Language: the extent to which the writing reveals an awareness of audience and purpose through word choice and sentence variety

 are stylistically sophisticated, using language that is precise and engaging, with a notable sense of voice and awareness of audience and purpose

 effectively incorporate a range of varied sentence patterns to reveal syntactic fluency



 use language that is fluent and original, with evident awareness of audience and purpose

 incorporate varied sentence patterns that reveal an awareness of different syntactic structures



 use appropriate language, with some awareness of audience and purpose

 make some attempt to include different sentence patterns but with awkward or uneven success



 rely on basic vocabulary, with little awareness of audience or purpose

 reveal a limited awareness of how to vary sentence patterns and rely on a limited range syntactic structures



 use language that is imprecise or unsuitable for the audience or purpose

 reveal a confused understanding of how to write in complete sentences and little or no ability to vary sentence patterns



 use language that is incoherent or inappropriate

 include a preponderance of sentence fragments and run-ons that significantly hinder comprehension




2/3/03
Conventions: the extent to which the writing exhibits conventional spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, capitalization, and grammar

 demonstrate control of the conventions with essentially no errors, even with sophisticated language

 demonstrate control of the conventions, exhibiting occasional errors only when using sophisticated language (e.g., punctuation of complex sentences)

 demonstrate partial control, exhibiting occasional errors that do not hinder comprehension (e.g., incorrect use of homonyms)


 demonstrate emerging control, exhibiting frequent errors that somewhat hinder comprehension (e.g., agreement of pronouns and antecedents; spelling of basic words)

 demonstrate lack of control, exhibiting frequent errors that make comprehension difficult (e.g., subject verb agreement; use of slang)

 illegible or unrecognizable as literate English

Retrieved September 25, 2009 from Greece Central School District, http://web000.greece.k12.ny.us/instruction/ela/6-12/Rubrics/persuasive%20writing%20rubric.doc



Rubric for a Research Project                                  Student Name(s)_____________________________Final Grade________

 

Thesis/Problem/

Question

Information Seeking /Selecting and Evaluating

Analysis

Synthesis

Documentation

Product/Process

4

Student(s) posed a thoughtful, creative question that engaged them in challenging or provocative research. The question breaks new ground or contributes to knowledge in a focused, specific area.

Student(s) gathered information from a variety of quality electronic and print sources, including appropriate licensed databases. Sources are relevant, balanced and include critical readings relating to the thesis or problem. Primary sources were included (if appropriate).

Student(s) carefully analyzed the information collected and drew appropriate and inventive conclusions supported by evidence. Voice of the student writer is evident.

Student(s) developed appropriate structure for communicating product, incorporating variety of quality sources. Information is logically and creatively organized with smooth transitions.

Student(s) documented all sources, including visuals, sounds, and animations. Sources are properly cited, both in-text/in-product and on Works-Cited/Works-Consulted pages/slides. Documentation is error-free.

Student(s) effectively and creatively used appropriate communication tools to convey their conclusions and demonstrated thorough, effective research techniques. Product displays creativity and originality.

3

Student(s) posed a focused question involving them in challenging research.

Student(s) gathered information from a variety of relevant sources--print and electronic

Student (s) product shows good effort was made in analyzing the evidence collected

Student(s) logically organized the product and made good connections among ideas

Student(s) documented sources with some care, Sources are cited, both in-text/in-product and on Works-Cited/Works-Consulted pages/slides. Few errors noted.

Student(s) effectively communicated the results of research to the audience.

2

Student(s) constructed a question that lends itself to readily available answers

Student(s) gathered information from a limited range of sources and displayed minimal effort in selecting quality resources

Student(s) conclusions could be supported by stronger evidence. Level of analysis could have been deeper.

Student(s) could have put greater effort into organizing the product

Student(s) need to use greater care in documenting sources. Documentation was poorly constructed or absent.

Student(s) need to work on communicating more effectively

1

Student(s) relied on teacher-generated questions or developed a question requiring little creative thought.

Student(s) gathered information that lacked relevance, quality, depth and balance.

Student(s) conclusions simply involved restating information. Conclusions were not supported by evidence.

Student(s) work is not logically or effectively structured.

Student(s) clearly plagiarized materials.

Student(s) showed little evidence of thoughtful research. Product does not effectively communicate research findings.

Teacher/Librarian Comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retrieved September 26, 2009 from http://www.sdst.org/shs/library/resrub.html

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION VALUE RUBRIC [retrieved September 29, 2009 from http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/index.cfm]
for more information, please contact value@aacu.org
The VALUE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty. The rubrics articulate fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubrics are intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The core expectations articulated in all 15 of the VALUE rubrics can and should be translated into the language of individual campuses, disciplines, and even courses. The utility of the VALUE rubrics is to position learning at all undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can by shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success.
Definition

Written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. Written communication involves learning to work in many genres and styles. It can involve working with many different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Written communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.


Framing Language

This writing rubric is designed for use in a wide variety of educational institutions. The most clear finding to emerge from decades of research on writing assessment is that the best writing assessments are locally determined and sensitive to local context and mission. Users of this rubric should, in the end, consider making adaptations and additions that clearly link the language of the rubric to individual campus contexts.


This rubric focuses assessment on how specific written work samples or collections of work respond to specific contexts. The central question guiding the rubric is "How well does writing respond to the needs of audience(s) for the work?" In focusing on this question the rubric does not attend to other aspects of writing that are equally important: issues of writing process, writing strategies, writers' fluency with different modes of textual production or publication, or writer's growing engagement with writing and disciplinarity through the process of writing.
Evaluators using this rubric must have information about the assignments or purposes for writing guiding writers' work. Also recommended is including reflective work samples of collections of work that address such questions as: What decisions did the writer make about audience, purpose, and genre as s/he compiled the work in the portfolio? How are those choices evident in the writing -- in the content, organization and structure, reasoning, evidence, mechanical and surface conventions, and citational systems used in the writing? This will enable evaluators to have a clear sense of how writers understand the assignments and take it into consideration as they evaluate.
The first section of this rubric addresses the context and purpose for writing. A work sample or collections of work can convey the context and purpose for the writing tasks it showcases by including the writing assignments associated with work samples. But writers may also convey the context and purpose for their writing within the texts. It is important for faculty and institutions to include directions for students about how they should represent their writing contexts and purposes.
Faculty interested in the research on writing assessment that has guided our work here can consult the National Council of Teachers of English/Council of Writing Program Administrators' White Paper on Writing Assessment

(2008; http://www.wpacouncil.org/whitepaper) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication's Writing Assessment: A Position Statement (2008; http://www.ncte.org/cccc/resources/positions/123784.htm)


Glossary

The definitions that follow were developed to clarify terms and concepts used in this rubric only.

• Content Development: The ways in which the text explores and represents its topic in relation to its audience and purpose.

• Context of and purpose for writing: The context of writing is the situation surrounding a text: who is reading it? who is writing it? Under what circumstances will the text be shared or circulated? What social or political factors might affect how the text is composed or interpreted? The purpose for writing is the writer's intended effect on an audience. Writers might want to persuade or inform; they might want to report or summarize information; they might want to work through complexity or confusion; they might want to argue with other writers, or connect with other writers; they might want to convey urgency or amuse; they might write for themselves or for an assignment or to remember.

• Disciplinary conventions: Formal and informal rules that constitute what is seen generally as appropriate within different academic fields, e.g. introductory strategies, use of passive voice or first person point of view, expectations for thesis or hypothesis, expectations for kinds of evidence and support that are appropriate to the task at hand, use of primary and secondary sources to provide evidence and support arguments and to document critical perspectives on the topic. Writers will incorporate sources according to disciplinary and genre conventions, according to the writer's purpose for the text. Through increasingly sophisticated use of sources, writers develop an ability to differentiate between their own ideas and the ideas of others, credit and build upon work already accomplished in the field or issue they are addressing, and provide meaningful examples to readers.

• Evidence: Source material that is used to extend, in purposeful ways, writers' ideas in a text.

• Genre conventions: Formal and informal rules for particular kinds of texts and/or media that guide formatting, organization, and stylistic choices, e.g. lab reports, academic papers, poetry, webpages, or personal essays.

• Sources: Texts (written, oral, behavioral, visual, or other) that writers draw on as they work for a variety of purposes -- to extend, argue with, develop, define, or shape their ideas, for example.


WRITTEN COMMUNICATION VALUE RUBRIC for more information, please contact value@aacu.org

Definition Written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. Written communication involves learning to work in many genres and styles. It can involve working with many different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Written communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.
Evaluators are encouraged to assign a zero to any work sample or collection of work that does not meet benchmark (cell one) level performance.




Capstone

4


Milestones

3 2


Benchmark

1


Context of and purpose for writing

Includes considerations of audience, purpose, and the circumstances surrounding the writing task(s).

Demonstrates a thorough understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned task(s) and focuses all elements of the work.

Demonstrates adequate consideration of context, audience, and purpose and a clear focus on the assigned task(s) (e.g., the task aligns with audience, purpose, and context).

Demonstrates awareness of context, audience, purpose, and to the assigned tasks(s) (e.g., begins to show awareness of audience's perceptions and assumptions).

Demonstrates minimal attention to context, audience, purpose, and to the assigned tasks(s) (e.g., expectation of instructor or self as audience).

Content Development

Uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to illustrate mastery of the subject, conveying the writer's understanding, and shaping the whole work.

Uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to explore ideas within the context of the discipline and shape the whole work


Uses appropriate and relevant content to develop and explore ideas through most of the work.


Uses appropriate and relevant content to develop simple ideas in some parts of the work.


Genre and disciplinary conventions

Formal and informal rules inherent in the expectations for writing in particular forms and/or academic fields (please see glossary).

Demonstrates detailed attention to and successful execution of a wide range of conventions particular to a specific discipline and/or writing task (s) including organization, content, presentation, formatting, and stylistic choices

Demonstrates consistent use of important conventions particular to a specific discipline and/or writing task(s), including organization, content, presentation, and stylistic choices


Follows expectations appropriate to a specific discipline and/or writing task(s) for basic organization, content, and presentation


Attempts to use a consistent system for basic organization and presentation


Sources and evidence

Demonstrates skillful use of high quality, credible, relevant sources to develop ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre of the writing

Demonstrates consistent use of credible, relevant sources to support ideas that are situated within the discipline and genre of the writing.

Demonstrates an attempt to use credible and/or relevant sources to support ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre of the writing.

Demonstrates an attempt to use sources to support ideas in the writing.


Control of syntax and mechanics

Uses graceful language that skillfully communicates meaning to readers with clarity and fluency, and is virtually error-free.

Uses straightforward language that generally conveys meaning to readers. The language in the portfolio has few errors.

Uses language that generally conveys meaning to readers with clarity, although writing may include some errors.

Uses language that sometimes impedes meaning because of errors in usage


Rubrics for Assessing Information Competence in the California State University



ACRL Standard

Beginning

Proficient

Advanced


1. Determine the Extent of the Information Needed

Student is unable to effectively formulate a research question based on an information need.

Student can formulate a question that is focused and clear. Student identifies concepts related to the topic, and can find a sufficient number of information resources to meet the information need.

Question is focused, clear, and complete. Key concepts and terms are identified. Extensive information sources are identified in numerous potential formats.

2. Access the Needed Information Effectively and Efficiently

Student is unfocused and unclear about search strategy.

Time is not used effectively and efficiently. Information gathered lacks relevance, quality, and balance.



Student executes an appropriate search strategy within a reasonable amount of time. Student can solve problems by finding a variety of relevant information resources, and can evaluate search effectiveness.

Student is aware and able to analyze search results, and evaluate the appropriateness of the variety of (or) multiple relevant sources of information that directly fulfill an information need for the particular discipline,

3. Evaluate Information and its Sources Critically

Student is unaware of criteria that might be used to judge information quality. Little effort is made to examine the information located

Student examines information using criteria such as authority, credibility, relevance, timeliness, and accuracy, and

is able to make judgments about

what to keep and what to discard.


Multiple and diverse sources and viewpoints of information are compared and evaluated according to specific criteria appropriate for the discipline. Student is able to match criteria to a specific information need, and can articulate how identified sources relate to the context of the discipline.

4. Use Information Effectively to Accomplish a Specific Purpose

Student is not

aware of the information necessary to research a topic, and the types of data that would be useful in formulating a convincing argument. Information is incomplete and does not support the intended purpose.



Student uses appropriate information to solve a problem, answer a question, write a paper, or other purposes

Student is aware of the breadth and depth of research on a topic, and is able to reflect on search strategy, synthesize and integrate information from a variety of sources, draw appropriate conclusions, and is able to clearly communicate ideas to others

5. Understand the Economic, Legal, and Social Issues surrounding the Use of Information, and Access and Use Information Ethically and Legally

Student is unclear regarding proper citation format, and/or copies and paraphrases the information and ideas of others without giving credit to authors. Student does not know how to distinguish between information that is objective and biased, and does not know the role that free access to information plays in a democratic society.

Student gives credit for works used by quoting and listing references. Student is an ethical consumer and producer of information, and understands how free access to information, and free expression, contribute to a democratic society.


Student understands and recognizes the concept of intellectual property, can defend him/herself if challenged, and

can properly incorporate the ideas/published works of others into their own work building upon them. Student can articulate the value of information to a free and democratic society, and can use specific criteria to discern objectivity/fact from bias/propaganda.



*Prepared by the CSU Information Competence Initiative, October 2002, based on the 2000 ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards For Higher Education. For more information, see http://www.calstate.edu/LS/1_rubric.doc.


Allen -



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